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Author Topic: Shadowlands and Tellynott  (Read 3446 times)

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #30 on: July 11, 2019, 10:48:14 PM »
Did you notice Dennis - even when John is relaxing in his cabin he is still working on the layout!

That sounds great, John.  I will look forward to a future visit here.  My wife and I have a good friend in Athens, Georgia whom we hope to visit in the not to distant future.  We would also like to catch up with Tampa Jim in Tampa, Florida.  Jim has visited us here twice now.

Cheers, Mark.

DennisBourey

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #31 on: July 11, 2019, 11:16:47 PM »
Mark, Yes he does. He's addicted for some unknown reason............ ;)
Dennis

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #32 on: July 12, 2019, 11:10:31 PM »
Hi guys.

Moving forwards I wanted to clarify some of the overall planning and the changes that have so far come about.  Right from the very beginning of the idea to expand Tellynott and add a mountain scene there has been a problem with height.  The reason for this is that I wanted Tellynott to be viewed from almost eye level, whereas with Shadowlands I wanted to create a large height differential between the highest and lowest tracks.  As Tellynott is set on the water it needs to be at the lowest point of the layout (which it isn't).  As the track pierces the backdrop and enters Shadowlands it should enter at the lowest point of Shadowlands and then start to climb.  Coupled with this was the desire to create the large height differential between lowest and highest tracks but not really having sufficient room (or time in my life!) to obtain this differential without that inevitable 'bowl of spaghetti'!  I had decided on a helix to solve this problem some time ago, but because of space limitations at the old house, the position of the helix has always been set at the top right corner of the plans so far shown.  In this position there were all sorts of problems (including hidden turnouts) that I had never been able to solve to my satisfaction.  Its funny how you can't see the wood for the trees sometimes - but it wasn't until quite recently that it dawned on me that with the space now available to me the helix no longer has to go in this position!

The below plan shows the new design.  As I am a pencil designer - and there are still a lot of decisions to make moving forwards - this is just a 'sketch'.  I will create a much better, more colourful and easier to comprehend version in the near future, but for now, this plan should hopefully clarify the overall design somewhat.  Tellynott is pictured on the bottom and right 2/3rds of the plan.  The rest is Shadowlands.  The helix is now on the other side of the division wall, next to the internal doorway.  The main line leaves Tellynott through the backdrop after the first curved wall after leaving the yard.  It runs along behind the backdrop where, just before the second curved wall, it encounters a double slip.  By going straight through the double slip the track then makes a left turn and enters the helix by the division wall (all of this track work will be hidden, but easily accessible).  The helix makes several revolutions clockwise and trains will exit from a tunnel at the lowest level of Shadowlands.  There will also be a set of points near here whereby trains can pierce the division wall to the hidden sidings and return loop under the Tellynott peninsula (Inglletown).

The other advantage of this new design is that I can now build the layout in three stages.  Stage one will be Tellynott, stage 2 will be the helix and the bench-work from here to the division wall at the top of the plan (including all the area behind the backdrop of Tellynott) and stage three will be the rest.  In this way there will be far less of a rush to build a new two bay barn that will house the station wagon as I can complete stage two while the car still parks in the same space.

I will make an effort to print off the plan below, darken the lines, and add written explanations to help clarify.

More soon, cheers, Mark.

postalkarl

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #33 on: July 13, 2019, 11:17:31 AM »
Hey mark:

Looks like you are moving right along. Beautifully done so far.

Karl

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #34 on: July 13, 2019, 06:01:46 PM »
Hi guys.

Thanks, Karl.  Yep - trying to keep the motivation going.

That's definitely one of the reasons I like to post on a thread like this - it helps keep me motivated.  Its also a great way to meet new friends, and even though I live on the other side of the world from most of you, I have still had the pleasure of meeting some of you, and I'm sure I will meet more in the future.  I also do a lot of my modelling by myself so it is a great way to share one of my great passions with like minded people.  Of course we all learn from each other.  Everyone is an expert in something.  Another important reason is that by having to explain your ideas to others you end up really analyzing what you are doing and this often leads to a greater understanding - often combined with a 'eureka!' moment.

I had quite a bit of fun following those little black lines around with a highlighter, and in the process discovered that it would be very easy to add a continuous run to the river return loop.  I have drawn this in and will consider its uses in the different stages of construction.  I does mean I will be able to run trains while I work on the layout without them getting in the way.  I have named the high and low points Mountain and River to help make things clear.  Even though I decided against looping around the room twice, there is still a lot of pink!  (no bowl of spaghetti here, ah?)

Anyway, attached is a photo of a more colourful plan with some written explanations.  Hopefully it makes a bit more sense.  I have put in four heights for your reference.  The largest height differential is 21".  I'm sure in a mountain scene that will look like miles.

More soon, cheers, Mark.

S&S RR

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #35 on: July 13, 2019, 07:07:45 PM »
Mark


Great looking plan.   As a point of reference - the lowest track on my S&S RR is 42 inches and the highest is 63 inches - 21 inches of difference. I found it interesting. ;) 
John Siekirk
Superior & Seattle Railroad

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #36 on: July 14, 2019, 04:01:17 PM »
Thanks, John.  Yes - interesting that our height variations are the same.  I'm kind of governed by the area to the left of River and Mountain.  If I keep the first three bridges level leaving Mountain then I need a 3% grade to achieve an 18" height differential between River and Mountain.  I can expand this area slightly, but at its present size it seems to fit well aesthetically and be in proportion.  I also start to push the boundaries of what is easily accessible when reaching in to work on the scenery.  Also, the bottom left corner of the room was set aside to house my Fault Lines layout.  The more I think about it the more I think I will leave it as it is - although I will rotate the track-work a little to the left using the center of the top circle of track as the center of rotation in order to increase the isle width when entering Shadowlands.  The other important height governor is the double slip.  This will be somewhere between 58 1/2" and 60 1/2".  I have made decisions regards the different viewing heights of Graves Elevators and my Tap and Die diorama and these are both situated on sidings off the Mountain loop (in yellow).  This will dictate the track height the height of the track as it pierces the backdrop, and thus the double slip.

More soon, cheers, Mark.

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #37 on: July 17, 2019, 03:17:35 AM »
Hi guys.

Well I thought I should update my 'layout at a glance'.  I also realise that some readers will not know about my other/ previous threads, so this should fill in a few blanks.

The layout at a glance.

Name:  Shadowlands and Tellynott (S&T)
Scale:  HO (1:87)
Prototype:  Freelanced - influenced by Jacksons Bay and urban NZ - mainly Lyttelton and Wellington.
Locale:  New Zealand
Period:  1932
Layout style:  Freestanding walk around
Layout height:  39.5" - 60.5"
Benchwork:  L-girder
Roadbed:  Homasote on MDF
Track:  Peco code 100
Length of mainline:  220 feet
Turnout minimum:  No 4
Minimum curve radius:  17 inches
Maximum grade:  3%
Scenery construction:  Plaster on polystyrene
Control:  DCC

Below is some information about Lyttleton - my Tellynott layouts original inspiration.  I'll try to write something up about Wellington as well.

Lyttelton is a steep port town (now a suburb of Christchurch) about 20 minutes drive from the center of the city.  A single track mainline negotiates these hills via a rail tunnel 1.5 miles long.  The tunnel was completed in 1867, and at the time, was one of the longest tunnels in the world, and the first to be driven through the side of an extinct volcano.  A ferry service was introduced from Lyttelton to Wellington in 1895 (connecting the South Island to the North Island) and continued until 1976.  This gave rise to the introduction of the boat train, which soon became a twice daily service.  Passengers were picked up from Lyttelton wharf in the morning after their overnight sailing from Wellington and taken through the tunnel to Christchurch, while in the evening passengers bound for Wellington were dropped off.  A road tunnel was also constructed, but not until 1964.  For years rail was the primary source of transport for goods from the mainland to the port.  Lyttelton became a popular destination for picnics and fishing off the wharf and in its hay day, 23 passenger trains traveled the 6.25-mile journey between Christchurch and Lyttelton daily.

The name Tellynott is an anagram of Lyttleton, and the port of Lyttelton has certainly been a major influence on the design of the Tellynott section of my layout. The steep site and small area demand complex and tight track-work in order to service as many wharves and industries as possible. This has also led to a large variety of industries in a very small space. Likewise, extremely small building sites have led to the structures being squeezed in, and the tendency to spread vertically rather than horizontally. I have exaggerated this vertical element and have looked to other New Zealand towns and cities for appropriate prototype buildings to either kit-bash or scratch-build.

More soon, cheers, Mark.

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #38 on: July 19, 2019, 11:42:04 PM »
Hi guys.

I've been playing around with schematics.  Below is the version that doesn't involve the building of a new barn (yet).  This will be run as a point to point.  Tellynott to River, River to Mountain, Mountain to Tellynott (via the high return cutoff).  On their way to and from River trains can visit the low loop to be replaced.  I'm not convinced that the return cutoff here is necessary.

More soon, cheers, Mark.

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #39 on: July 20, 2019, 05:30:37 PM »
Hi guys.

As Maori legend tells it,  Wellington is the head of the great fish that Maui hooked and hauled from the sea (the North Island representing the fish, while the South Island is the canoe).  She is a city of character and beauty, who grew over the decades, spreading up the Hutt river valley, around the shores of Cook Strait, and along the harbours and bays to the North. 

I first fell in love with photographs of fantastic wharf scenes of the early 1900's - photos bustling with life, with pretty ships and Clydesdale horses and the wondrous shapes of a row of hydraulic cranes.  Smoke and fog intermingled and clouded the sea air, but somehow through all that grime and grit I saw a romantic notion of life.  I visited Christchurch's many libraries and checked out many books on the city and also purchased any good ones I found in second hand book shops, especially when visiting Wellington.  I developed a shortlist of buildings I hoped to build one day, and many on that list were from Wellington.  On one trip a few years ago I found a book entitled 'The Compleat Cityscapes' written David McGill and illustrated by Grant Tilly.  It featured 244 heritage sketches of Wellington structures , many of them residential houses, and many located in some of Wellingtons steepest suburbs.  It was one of those finds that I was so super excited by.  When we moved to our new house with the extra modelling space the idea came to me to build an entire peninsula devoted to residential housing, using The Compleat Cityscapes almost solely as my inspiration.  As the idea developed I decided to keep this area free from any visible railway.

More soon, cheers, Mark.

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #40 on: July 22, 2019, 02:38:54 AM »
Hi guys.

Well, after I had built my peninsula I spent some time playing with google earth and then with polystyrene.  I picked some of my favourite scenes from the book and looked on google earth maps using both terrain and street view to navigate around.  I found many of the houses were still standing, and many in very good condition.  I also found that many of the scenes I wanted to recreate were in close proximity to others.  I scaled up a map to the same scale as my layout plan and printed it off.  I then cut out the parts of the map featuring these scenes and recreated a street design that would fit into and flow with my layout peninsula design.

Photo 1 shows the paper plan after I had moved the cutout streets and found a configuration I thought would work well.  You can see I have referenced many pages from my book of scenes and structures I want to recreate.

I then drew the plan in HO scale on the peninsula and cut polystyrene into wedges.  I cut these into sections about 2" long and used them to create curved roads at grade.  Once this was complete I scanned all the structures from the book I wanted to build and enlarged until they were HO scale.  I then printed all these images, cut them out and attached them to blocks of polystyrene.  I arranged them on the layout until I was fairly happy.  I then went about creating smallish dioramas that would fit together in a kind of jigsaw, and which I could work on at the modelling bench at a later date.  I used expanding foam to fill any gaps.

Photos 2-6 show the process coming together.  You can see in photo 5 one of the finished diorama bases and in photo 6 it is put in position.

More soon, cheers , Mark.
 

cuse

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #41 on: July 22, 2019, 06:12:13 AM »
Wow...that's quite a process. Very impressive!


Zephyrus52246

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #42 on: July 22, 2019, 07:39:24 AM »
Your research and development of this layout concept is quite amazing to me.  Keep going!


Jeff

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #43 on: July 22, 2019, 07:57:06 AM »
Mark


This thread is fantastic! I'm really enjoying the detailed description of the design process.
John Siekirk
Superior & Seattle Railroad

mark dalrymple

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Re: Shadowlands and Tellynott
« Reply #44 on: July 22, 2019, 04:26:44 PM »
Hi guys.

Thanks very much for the comments Cuse, Jeff and John!  I was beginning to wonder if anyone was watching.

Well - here are a few more photos, some of which will fill in a few gaps in the process.

Photo 1 - I did this same process when designing the back wall of Tellynott, only I used a street map of Lyttelton.  This photo shows the cut out street map being manipulated into a position that I thought would work on the layout plan.  You can see I decided to crop the street map.  With the peninsula the process was the same except I had several smaller pieces that I had to manipulate and connect rather like a jigsaw.

Photo 2 - shows the high edge of the peninsula.  I intend to build a folding step here for viewers to stand on.  I want to create views down those curving streets with the rest of Tellynott across the isle in the background.  I'm hoping this will help make the layout appear much larger than it actually is.  You can see the timber along the top of the edge.  This is the top fixing for my facsia of MDF.  Its one of those things that is way easier to do during this process, rather than as an afterthought.

Photo 3 - Here we have the diorama housing my scratch-build based on Graves Elevators.  You can see all the flat head nails in the top and the side of the road sections.  I glue these in place and foam the gaps while the nails are in place and remove them when everything is dry.  I use Selleys quick grab in a caulking gun for gluing.

Photo 4 - this photo shows the Graves diorama in position.  The track here is the only track that will be visible on the whole diorama and it is right up against the far wall.

Photo 5 - Here is another photo showing the dioramas coming together.  I labeled them as I went to help show the process.

Photo 6 - Here is a shot showing all 12 dioramas in position.

More soon, cheers, Mark.