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Author Topic: The dreaded nailhole topic, but...  (Read 265 times)

JimF

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The dreaded nailhole topic, but...
« on: June 21, 2019, 01:29:29 PM »
Not one about whether to do them or not, so you don't have to duck and run LOL

Would the nail holes all be in one line the whole height of the wall? Would all of the boards have been the same length?

Just curious, before I try doing some.

Thanks.

Jim F

deemery

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Re: The dreaded nailhole topic, but...
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2019, 01:52:08 PM »
I -believe- that siding should be nailed into each stud, so the short answer to your question would be "yes". 


dave
Modeling the Northeast in the 1890s - because the little voices told me to

mark dalrymple

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Re: The dreaded nailhole topic, but...
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2019, 03:52:29 PM »
Hi Jim.

The nail holes are set out to the studs.
Every opening (window or door) has an opening stud each side.
Building corners and windows and doors have facings which generally cover nail holes - making less work (as less nail holes have to be filled) and helping keeping water ingress out.  Therefore you usually wont see nail holes at the very corner of your structures, and only above and below the openings on the opening studs.
Studs are generally 24" apart, although I believe earlier they may have been 18"?.
As the studs are set up for the internal dimensions of the rooms, there are not always consistent distances between every stud (each room needs a stud at all corners for internal lining fixing).  Likewise the nail holes in multi story buildings do not always line up from one floor to the next.

Weatherboards are cut to lengths at the sawmill.  These come in standard sizes but I have never seen them longer than 6 metres (20').

Builders generally start at the bottom of the building and put on a full length.  When they get to a corner they cut a board to suit, and the offcut starts the next row.  Every join needs a nail hole both sides about an inch up from the bottom, and nice and close so it would fix to the 2" stud.  I run all my nail holes first, and then use a blade to add board joins at appropriate places (cutting through the actual nail hole) and then go back and add the extra holes each side.
A building face of shorter width than the standard weatherboard length will generally have no joins in it.
Generally weatherboards only have one nail per stud per board - however, each nail goes through the bottom of one board and the top of the one below, so in actual fact they have two.

Lastly - try to make them subtle.

Cheers, Mark.

JimF

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Re: The dreaded nailhole topic, but...
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2019, 04:06:30 PM »
Thanks Dave and Mark.

Your short answer was what I thought, Dave, and Mark, you filled it all the details. I had thought the use of the off cuts was that way, thanks for confirming.

And yes, subtle is what I am trying for (I've never been a big advocate of nail holes on models, just my preference), as I wanted to give it a go with this kit. Not using the ponce wheel, don't like the appearance, so doing it one hole at a time with small needle in pin vise.

Thanks again.

Jim

S&S RR

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Re: The dreaded nailhole topic, but...
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2019, 04:30:30 PM »
Jim


I'm looking forward to some pictures.  There are some fine tooth properly spaced pounce wheels on the market. I have made nail heads with a pin before and I hope you are working on a very small building. ;) 
John Siekirk
Superior & Seattle Railroad