The Modeler's Forum

Station Stop => Layout Tours => Topic started by: Judge on January 05, 2019, 03:59:09 PM

Title: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 05, 2019, 03:59:09 PM
  There is no formal Saturday Report today because the A&S has been shut down due to "the Babe's" monthly hair appointment in Mount Dora.  No one knows how Mount Dora got its name.  The highest spot in the city can't be more than a foot above sea level.  Never-the-less, Mount Dora natives drive cars with bumper stickers that say "I climbed Mount Dora."

    Since there has been some enthusiasm for my Saturday Reports from Forum members, I have decided to occasionally provide information about the Atlantic and Southern Railroad to those who care to learn about it. 
    I have to admit that many of my stories had their origin in a book my father gave me years ago entitled "A Treasury of Railroad Folklore."  I have tried to change the stories to fit the particular circumstances of the A&S, but some of the information necessarily contains direct quotations.  I am also limited by the format limitations of the Forum.  It would be much easier if it were Word compatible. 
    I understand this first tale has some truth in it involving the purchase of the Hudson River Railroad by Commodore Vanderbilt in the late 1800's.

                                                                        HOW THE ATLANTIC & SOUTHERN WAS ACQUIRED

     The previous owners of the Atlantic & Southern were all members of the Bixbie family.  The patriarch of that family, Alphonse (Big Al) Bixby, found smoking to be offensive and prohibited it on any of his trains.
     One day, Commodore Vanderbilt happened to be riding on the A&S in order to connect with the ACL on his southern jaunt to Palm Beach.  (Flagler's FEC was enduring one of its many labor strikes at the time.)  The Commodore decided to take a trip from his stateroom to the baggage car and smoke one of his famous black Cuban cigars. 
     The A&S conductor happened into the baggage car just as the Commodore was lighting up.  The conductor tapped him on the shoulder and said, "There is no smoking allowed on this train."  "That is what I understand," the Commodore replied, and continued to smoke.  The conductor became more forceful and threatened to remove the Commodore from the train if he didn't put out his cigar.  The Commodore stated, "Do you know who I am?"  The conductor replied, "I don't care who you are, I am here to enforce the rules of this here railroad."  The Commodore replied, "You know, I like you.  You know how to enforce the rules.  I think I may just buy this railroad."  And, wouldn't you know it, the Commodore bought the railroad.  Shortly afterwards, he realized he didn't really want a railroad that wandered mainly through a Florida swamp and sold it at a loss to the present owners, who have relaxed the rule prohibiting the use of tobacco by providing spittoons in every passenger car.  Oh, by the way, a condition of the sale required the A&S to keep the Conductor on his post.   :)


                                                                                               

Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on January 05, 2019, 04:13:37 PM

Judge,


I, for one, greatly appreciate your information regarding the Atlantic & Southern.  Because this is a G rated forum, let me just say that I have to wonder if Mount Dora could possibly have been named after a lady that was overly generous with her personal favors.  After all, that might explain any deeper meaning behind those somewhat politically incorrect bumper stickers. 


Further, I find it interesting that the A&S allows tobacco on their passenger cars since I believe the road's current president abstains from any type of alcoholic beverage. 




I am not certain what you refer to when you say the forum is not "word compatible".  I often type some of my longer posts for construction threads as a word document, do a final edit,  and then simply copy and paste them into the reply box. 
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on January 05, 2019, 07:17:52 PM
I'm enjoying your reports Judge. Great addition to the forum.
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on January 05, 2019, 07:27:15 PM
Interesting story Judge.
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on January 05, 2019, 10:17:20 PM
Now the truth shall come out and be known to all who enter here (this is not a quote).

Jim
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on January 06, 2019, 07:57:14 AM
I'll certainly be following along on the history/folk lore of the A&S! 
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 06, 2019, 08:08:39 AM
Jerry, et al.  I appreciate your analysis of the origin of the name of the Town of Mt. Dora.  I will make inquiry of the mayor and endeavor to get his take on the subject. 

As for the use of tobacco and booze on the A&S . . . .  it is 1950-51 on the A&S and smoking is the norm in all public places.  I'm sure you recall reading about the millions of people who died each week from second hand smoke in 1950, as well as the thousands of children who perished for not being strapped into child safety seats, facing backwards towards the plastic seat covers.  It is a wonder any of us survived.  All of our parents would have been arrested for "child neglect" if it were today.  But that is progress.

As for "Word" limitations, I have not tried to copy and paste a document with footnotes into the forum page, but I have noticed the limitation on centering titles.  I am not complaining.  The forum was not created for essays from authors who have advanced technology training and are skilled in mimicking the prose of Lucius Bebee.  It is more for those who tweet and twitter.  But I shall use the tools available and press on with spinning my tales of the adventures of the Atlantic and Southern. 

Anyway, I am pleased that some of you are enjoying my whimsical look at the Railroad.     :) 
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on January 06, 2019, 08:18:01 AM
Thanks Judge, I will throw my hat in the ring as well saying that I look forward to and enjoy your tales and insights of the A&S RR.
Thanks again and all the best,
--Paul
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 06, 2019, 08:58:51 AM
Love the tales you are weaving Bill.....wasn't it wonderful that those Southern boys got such a great deal on the A&S from that fella from the cold north.....kinda of makes ya wonder.  ;D
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 06, 2019, 09:19:45 AM
As the new owner and President of the Atlantic and Southern RR, I must set the record straight. The Judge was very conservative and polite when telling the story of our Mt. Dora. I, on the other hand, just says what gots to be said.

Mt. Dora got the name from an early 1800's homesteader named, Ms. Dora Ann Drawdy. She was an independent cuse. Now we don't really know much about Ms. Dora except she befriended many of the federal surveyors in the area. She was also known for her warm hospitality and the surveyors named the lake after her rather "friendly" moments with them.

She homesteaded on what is now called Lake Dora in Mt. Dora. Now Dora was a big lady. She weighed almost 225 pounds, smoked a corncob pipe and chewed tobackie. She crushed Lantana flowers under her armpits for deodorant.

Due to her size and friendliness, one surveyor came up with the laogan, "I climbed Mount Dora."
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 06, 2019, 09:27:07 AM
As the new owner and President of the Atlantic and Southern RR, I must set the record straight. The Judge was very conservative and polite when telling the story of our Mt. Dora. I, on the other hand, just says what gots to be said.

Mt. Dora got the name from an early 1800's homesteader named, Ms. Dora Ann Drawdy. She was an independent cuse. Now we don't really know much about Ms. Dora except she befriended many of the federal surveyors in the area. She was also known for her warm hospitality and the surveyors named the lake after her rather "friendly" moments with them.

She homesteaded on what is now called Lake Dora in Mt. Dora. Now Dora was a big lady. She weighed almost 225 pounds, smoked a corncob pipe and chewed tobackie. She crushed Lantana flowers under her armpits for deodorant.

Due to her size and friendliness, one surveyor came up with the laogan, "I climbed Mount Dora."


.....and that's the rest of the story..... ;)
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 06, 2019, 09:37:40 AM
Commodore Vanderbilt dang near ruined the A&S RR. To him it was just another tax write off. Prior to him selling the railroad to the present owner, he nearly scrapped all the rolling stock. There are no A&S passenger cars remaining on the roster.

At one time, the current owners discussed renaming the railroad the Atlantic Southern System. That decision was dropped after someone said it would then be known as the ASS railroad.


A few locomotives did survive along with two hoppers, three boxcars and one caboose.

The two hoppers are still in revenue service as well as the caboose. The boxcars are in the car shop getting upgraded for revenue service. The locos are also being upgraded.

It has taken several years to get the A&S RR back earning revenue. At one point the resident Ticket Agent was going to have the Judge apply for a federal grant so new equipment could be purchased. After a very short board meeting, the decision was also made to not apply for the federal grant as the government has no business interfering in our business.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/24-060119090120.jpeg)

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/24-060119092908.jpeg)
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on January 06, 2019, 10:30:52 AM
Add me to the list of dedicated followers of the Saturday Report.   :D  I love it!   :D :D
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on January 06, 2019, 10:59:59 AM
I'm sure there'll be a discussion of the legal history of the A&S at some point from Hizzoner the Judge.  Many railroads had really wild legal history, so this story should be a doozey.  (And to my great surprise, some of what I learned about things like proxy fights from reading railroad history turned out to be useful in 1-1 scale, when the company I worked for was involved in a lawsuit for control.  The two parties each owned about 48% of the stock, so the actual control was in the hands of the dozen or so employees who held the remaining 4%.  Lots of stories from that experience!  At one point, i had a stack of legal filings and exhibits about 6" tall.)


dave
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 06, 2019, 11:30:21 AM
I know we are serious about building models and layouts, but the back stories that are made up for these empires can provide some entertaining reading.....remember Gnatshop, Captn. Mike and LongHornCaddy.


This is shaping up to be a ton of fun.....thanks guys.  8)
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 12, 2019, 08:41:06 AM
We have a busy day planned.
Title: Re: Saturday Report
Post by: Jim Donovan on January 12, 2019, 09:28:32 AM
Hummm

I am still getting my head wrapped around the writing being mimicked after Lucius Bebee.  Seems more like that of Samuel Clemens. However I suspect Samual will make a guest appearance at some point on this far reaching story of epic proportions.

With all twists and turns in the plot Congress may (or more likely not) require seat belts with shoulder harness on trains. I am buckled up and waiting on the next installment.

Jim D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 12, 2019, 02:43:23 PM
Saturday Report January 12, 2019

The A&S CEO and the Ticket Agent met and huddled in conference for a time this morning to discuss the progress on installation of marker lights on many of the cabeese (more than one caboose) on A&S property.  Progress is good, although some parts are still on order and causing delays.  One caboose belonging to the SAL was ready for service and it proudly followed up a local freight powered by an SAL Q3 Mike.  The freight made its rounds of the entire system, picking up and setting off boxcars in Tahope but the trip "came up short," forcing a shut down until the trouble could be discovered.

Trespassers were discovered on Railroad property and were identified by RR police as Greg DeMayo, Bob Butts, and Jim Miller.  Demayo entertained us with an engine that wouldn't run and Butts brought a beautifully assembled kit that he declined to donate to the A&S.  Miller, as usual, brought nothing.  The A&S crew and the trespassers turned in pie cards at Smokey Bones for lunch.  All-in-all, another great day in Central Florida where the sky is almost cloudless and the temperature approaches 80 degrees.  For all of you "up Nawth," sorry about that.

There was an incident reported between a passenger and the Sanlando ticket agent.  The incident was investigated and it was determined the complaint was unfounded.  A verbatim report of the incident is as follows:
                                                                                      TRAVELING BY PULLMAN ON THE CITY OF MIAMI

   Now everybody knows the crack passenger train from Miami to Chicago is the City of Miami.  The "City" is sometimes rerouted through Sanlando on the A&S because of labor trouble on the FEC.  On this particular day, a passenger approached the Sanlando ticket agent, who didn't seem at all concerned whether the passenger took the train or stayed home.  The passenger requested a berth on the "City"for the overnight trip to Chicago.
   "For a single passenger," the agent finally asked without enthusiasm?
   "No," the passenger replied.  "I am married, but I am not taking anybody with me.  A single berth will do fine." 
   "Upper or lower," asked the agent?
   "What's the difference, asked the passenger?
    "A difference of 50 cents,"came the answer.  Our prices to Chicago are $2.50 and $3.00.  You understand of course, explained the agent, the lower is higher than the upper.  The higher price is for the lower berth.  If you want a lower, you'll have to go higher.  We sell the upper lower than the lower.  It didn't used to be so, but we found out everybody wanted the lower.  In other words, the higher the fewer. 
   "Why do they all prefer the lower, the passenger asked?
   "On account of its convenience.  Most persons don't like the upper, although it's lower, on account of it being higher and because when you occupy an upper you have to get up to go to bed and then get down when you get up.  I would advise you to take the lower, although it's higher than the upper, for the reason I have stated - that the upper is lower than the lower because it is higher.  You can have the lower if you pay higher, but if you are willing to go higher, it will be lower."
   "What if I want a single compartment," asked the passenger?
   The agent ignored the question and handed the passenger a ticket for a lower.  "Have a nice trip," he said. 

 


                                                             
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 12, 2019, 03:00:29 PM
Yep, it occurred just as described.

The A&S shut down was caused by some upper level electrical issue. The lower level was still up and had higher electrical volts than the higher level which in reality had a lower level of electrical power.

Ya just can't make this stuff up.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on January 12, 2019, 03:18:49 PM


Ya just can't make this stuff up.

Tom  ;D



I've heard that truth is stranger than fiction, but I have my doubts about this one... :o :o :o
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 12, 2019, 03:38:35 PM


Ya just can't make this stuff up.

Tom  ;D



I've heard that truth is stranger than fiction, but I have my doubts about this one... :o :o :o


Jerry,

Well, maybe "Ya" can't make this stuff up but "We" certainly can.  :P :P

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on January 12, 2019, 03:55:39 PM
Great report Judge.  I'm sure glad the A&S has you to cut through all the BS and report the facts. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 12, 2019, 04:07:51 PM
Hey Bill....."Who's On First?.  ::)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on January 12, 2019, 04:11:29 PM


Ya just can't make this stuff up.

Tom  ;D



I've heard that truth is stranger than fiction, but I have my doubts about this one... :o :o :o


Jerry,

Well, maybe "Ya" can't make this stuff up but "We" certainly can.  :P :P

Tom  ;D

And "We" did.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on January 13, 2019, 10:50:33 AM
Trespassers were discovered on Railroad property and were identified by RR police as Greg DeMayo, Bob Butts, and Jim Miller.


Lucky for us the RR police decided to let us off with just a warning about the dangers of getting too close to the tracks.  He scolded Greg about littering on railroad property.  Must have been related to some prior encounter they had.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 13, 2019, 12:28:36 PM
Couldn't have been me.....I wasn't there yesterday..... ::)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report 1-19-19
Post by: Judge on January 20, 2019, 03:34:30 PM
  Sorry about the delay of publishing this week's Saturday Report.  I decided to include a couple of photographs with this week's A&S story and it was quite a learning curve for me.
   The A&S management had a long pow-wow to discuss the track plan off of the ovalix on the third level.  The curve the passenger trains will use to back into Union Station will be a radius of about 54" that ought to make backing passenger cars easy.
   The ACL Champion made a run and had a wreck, as is described below.  Fortunately there was no damage to the engine and the Champ made it into Sanlando on time.  An SAL local freight was the source of the problem that caused the wreck but the mainline was clear shortly after the investigation was complete.
    Curt Webb, of Pennsy fame, stopped by and ran a Pensy freight before we all checked out for lunch at Smokey Bones. 
After lunch activities mainly included Tom trying to teach your author how to import photographs into the Forum.  No luck there.  The process is not intuitive.
The following tale is true and I'm sticking to it. 




                                                                                        THE WRECK OF ACL 92


It was a rainy, spring night when SAL local freight 48 ran out of steam south of the Bascule bridge, with the caboose blocking the sidetrack into the Piney Woods Station.


(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-190119170608.jpeg)

The fireman, George (Crack-a-Diamond) Musselwhite, set to shoveling to bring up steam.  The conductor instructed the colored brakeman to walk about a mile back from the caboose and flag any oncoming traffic, including ACL's Champion, Number 92, which was due within 20 minutes.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-190119171822.jpeg)

The shack did as he was told but the Champ flew by him and collided with the stalled freight train's caboose, causing serious damage to property and personal injury to several passengers.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-200119151516.jpeg)

Naturally, several law suits were filed and the case was set for trial in the local federal court.
During pretrial maneuvers, the President of the A&S asked the conductor to explain what had happened.  The conductor requested a written explanation from the fireman and submitted the fireman's report to the railroad's President.  The report explained the situation poetically:

The wind was high, the steam was low,
The train was heavy and hard to tow,
The coal was wet from rain and dew,
 And that's why we blocked Number 92.

   The Plaintiff's lawyer, Larry Lickem, who represented the injured passengers, called Bud Millstone, the head brakeman, to give testimony about the status of the train crew just before the wreck.  Millstone, who had been a railroader for over 40 years, testified as follows:
   The con was flippin' tissue in the crummy's crow's nest, the hind shack was freezing a hot hub, tallow pot was crackin' diamonds in the tank, Eagle Eye was down greasing the pig, and I was bending the rail when 92 hit us."
   Under lengthy cross examination, this testimony was translated to mean, "The conductor was examining the way bills in the cupola of the caboose, the rear brakeman was cooling off a hot journal, the fireman was shoveling coal, the engineer was oiling the running gear on the locomotive, and the head brakeman was throwing a switch when the collision occurred."
   An eye witness to the wreck was standing near the freight station located near where the collision occurred.  Lawyer Lickem asked the witness, "What did you think after you saw the diesel run into the caboose?"  The witness answered, "This is one hell of a way to run a railroad."
   The ACL's lawyer, William Barett Richman, was concerned about the flagman's role in the wreck.  He called the flagman, Willie Jackson, who testified that he followed the conductor's orders to the letter by walking about a mile down the track and swinging his red lantern with all his might when Number 92 approached, but it passed him by without applying brakes.
   The jury found the ACL at fault for the wreck because Number 92 had warning of the obstruction in plenty of time to avoid the tragedy.  After the jury was dismissed, the SAL's lawyer spoke to Jackson outside the courtroom and congratulated him on his clear and convincing testimony.  Jackson replied, "I answered Mr. Richman's questions as truthfully as I could.  But I was really worried he'd ask me if that lantern was lit."
         








Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Janbouli on January 20, 2019, 04:25:39 PM
Great story , you are a wonderful narrator  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: rslaserkits on January 20, 2019, 04:50:24 PM

great story, love the last line
rich
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on January 20, 2019, 05:22:37 PM
Priceless! 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on January 20, 2019, 05:32:48 PM
Another wonderful 'Saturday Report' from the Judge ....   Priceless;   and what color these reports add to an already beautiful railroad.
Keep up the great work boys !!!
--Paul
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: madharry on January 20, 2019, 05:36:53 PM
Did the lights on the caboose help in anyway?
Mike :-\
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on January 20, 2019, 07:45:15 PM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 20, 2019, 08:40:33 PM
Love it Bill.....  It's a good thing I wasn't at the throttle during that episode.....Tom would not have been amused. ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on January 20, 2019, 08:56:02 PM
Another Great report and story.  Keep them coming!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 21, 2019, 06:57:37 AM
Good morning everyone!  And thanks for following my stories on the Saturday Report. 

And now, as Paul Harvey used to say, for the rest of the story.   The marker lights on the SAL  caboose did indeed contribute to the accident.  The ICC investigation report indicated that after 92 passed Jackson,the hind shack, the engineer saw the markers in the distance and put the brakes into emergency.  This action caused most of the injuries to the passengers, who were just getting down from their uppers and up from their lowers and heading to the rest rooms.  However, as you can see from the photos, 92 was almost at a complete stop when it collided with the caboose because the damage was minimal and when 92 backed away, the caboose righted itself on the mainline.

Stay tuned for a new adventure next week.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on January 21, 2019, 09:02:29 AM
Great story and the pictures were worth the effort you made. Thanks Judge Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on January 21, 2019, 09:19:34 AM
Great story and the pictures were worth the effort you made. Thanks Judge Jim

What he said!   :)

I'm glad the layout is set in the 50's.  If it was modern day I can just imagine the commercials we'd be hearing..."Involved in a car, motorcycle or train accident?  Call Attorney...."   ::)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on January 21, 2019, 09:25:02 AM

Judge,


The courtroom drama seems all too real, maybe drawn from personal experience?
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on January 21, 2019, 09:38:23 AM
Greg, if you would of been running the passenger train when you hit the caboose it would of exploded just like in the movies...oh the humanity! :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on January 21, 2019, 11:58:43 AM
Greg, if you would of been running the passenger train when you hit the caboose it would of exploded just like in the movies...oh the humanity! :)

Greg was not worried about any accident on the A&S as he is represented by the law firm of Dewey, Cheatem and Howe, who were recently trying to find cheap office space in Tahope.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 21, 2019, 02:50:33 PM
Miller - There is only one lawyer in Tahope and he is the in-house counsel for the A&S, whose name is Marvin Bello.  A second lawyer is not welcome because they would sue each other. 

I tried to send the comment below out earlier this morning but it disappeared.  I guess I am still a novice at using the Forum's platform.  Perhaps my earlier missive is out there somewhere, so if you run across it, delete it.

There has been some inquiry as to why a perfectly good SAL Q3 Mike would run out of steam on flat terrain while pulling #48 and cause the Champion to collide with its caboose.  The answer was found in my newly acquired book entitled "Hogger," that I purchased from AMAZON. 

When local freight #48 left the yard, the green fireman had the pop-offs popping, but by the time the train got to Eaton's curve, the pressure was dropping faster than a barometer just before a hurricane (we have those in Florida).  The Mike made it to the Piney Woods Station and just ran out of steam.  The engineer opened the fire door and was surprised to see the fire completely out.  The green fireman had forgotten to turn on the blower and had kept shoveling coal.  The wet coal covered the fire and snuffed it out.  It was quite a show of skill to get the fire hot again by the time the ICC inspectors had finished their work.  The fireman would have been given his papers except for the fact that he was the superintendent's nephew.  Whew!

It's sunny and 60 degrees here in beautiful Central Florida.  Sorry about that.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 21, 2019, 02:58:33 PM
Greg, if you would of been running the passenger train when you hit the caboose it would of exploded just like in the movies...oh the humanity! :)

Greg was not worried about any accident on the A&S as he is represented by the law firm of Dewey, Cheatem and Howe, who were recently trying to find cheap office space in Tahope.

Jim
Hi guys.....I know nothing.....I see nothing.....I hear nothing.....I wasn't there, whenever there was.  ::)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 26, 2019, 04:52:39 PM
Saturday Report January 25, 2019.
The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours to discuss progress on the area known as "Summit," which is located where the track on the Ovalix achieves its highest point leading to the third level of the Atlantic & Southern.  And there was much progress, including  track laying and turnout locating.  The road is now operable from "the bottoms" (the lowest level) to the Summit.  There was a celebration trip.  An SAL GP7 (with boiler) was coupled to three passenger cars and ran from Summit to the bottoms.  The trip, at speed step 25, took a few seconds over 11 minutes.  Interestingly, the WOW sound decoder apparently automatically slowed the engine as it made its decent.  We timed the reverse trip at the same speed from the bottoms to Summit and it only took 9 minutes, 45 seconds - and we added one more car.  The additional car was a solarium by Pullman that provided an excursion for the mayor and city council of the City of Tahope.  The sounds of happy politicians enjoying the freebees attendant to such a trip was a joy to hear and did not influence them in any way to be in favor of the Atlantic & Southern's future projects.

Additionally, five passenger cars of the IC persuasion were delivered from the Sanford Car Shops and are now ready for the electrician to finish the interior lighting.

Oh, yes, before we broke for lunch President Langford  made a video of ACL's 1516 (A USRA Pacific that was purchased in 1965 - so it has lasted much longer than the prototype of the same number).  1516 pulled four passenger cars up the 1 percent grade of the Ovalix without difficulty.  Unfortunately, due to a low hanging coupler, the train broke in two just before it reached Summit.

We surrendered out pie cards at Smokey Bones and feasted on the blue plate special.

After lunch we did a little switching and viewed the video.  Then we called it a day - but not before The Babe gave your writer an ice cold peanut butter pie to take back to Sanford.  No worry, it is all low-cal.

Today's story involves the telling of tall tales in the roundhouse.  Reminds me of bull sessions in college and in the army.  Here goes:

                                                                                     THE PRESIDENT'S DAUGHTER

   The good ole boys were sitting around the round house one evening waiting for Number 835 to come in for a quick turnaround.  The question of who had traveled fastest over the rails came up.
   Ethan Douglas, one of the A&S engineers, said, "You boys want to know something about speed?  I can tell you one that will curl your hair.  One day back when I was a hogger for the A&LM, we were pulling a freight with 40 cars down a steep grade off a mountain in Arkansas.  I had checked the air before we left the yard and it was working.  As we picked up speed on the downgrade, I went to hold her back and I got nothin'.  I whistled for brakes but the skipper and the hind shack must have been sleeping because they paid me no mind and we went faster and faster.  We went so fast you might not believe it if I told you." 
   "I'd believe about anything tonight,"said a nut splitter named Anderson. 
   "We wus goin' so fast," declared Douglas, "that the train crew didn't hear the whistles because the crummy went past the noise before they could hear it."
   "Wait a minute," said the conductor, I've got some figuring to do." 
   "Don't stop him," said the hostler, "he's pert near got 'em strung out."
   "Yes," Douglas continued, "we wus in quite a fix. I called the fireman over to my side and said "Jim, his name was Jim." "Jim," we're in a hell of a pickle and we are the only ones who can get us out of it. So, do you know what we did?"
   "Didya Drop an anchor,"asked the conductor?
   "We didn't have no anchor, but I'll tell you what we did do.  Me and Jim, we both grabbed the reverse lever and, pulling with all our might, we set her in the back corner."
   "Then what happened,"said the hostler, cautiously?
   "Well, that old ten-wheeler ran backwards so fast that it caught up with the whistle noise and woke up the hind shack, who set the brakes, stopping us within ten feet of the worst wash-out in the history of the road.  Did I mention the president's daughter? 
   "You forgot that part," someone said.
   "Well the president's daughter was on board that train and she was so grateful to Jim and me she wanted to marry one of us.  But I was too old and Jim was too young so she married the brakeman."
   "Well," remarked the conductor, "that may not be the best lie I've ever heard but it is the biggest.  Whoever heard of a brakeman getting married?"
   "It's the God's truth, said Douglas. 
   

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 26, 2019, 05:00:56 PM
Great one Bill..... ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 26, 2019, 05:01:38 PM
Oh my, what a story. Imagine telling us the brakeman got married. What a whopper lie that was.

Here's the proof of old #1516.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Nq5kGVpoT8
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on January 26, 2019, 05:55:10 PM
Great story...er, I mean history Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on January 26, 2019, 09:26:12 PM
Another fine report - great to hear about the good times on The Atlantic & Southern.  Tom I know where you left your watch.  Check the video.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 27, 2019, 08:16:57 AM
John,

Funny, if only I could find stuff by looking at the video, life would surely be easier, especially in the train room.  :P :P :P


Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on January 27, 2019, 12:22:59 PM

Inquiring minds want to know,
why was the engineer of 1516 blowing for grade crossings in the ovalix? There's gotta' be a back story there, somewhere.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 27, 2019, 01:12:42 PM

Gentle readers:
1516 blew her whistle for crossings in the Ovalix in order to (1) show off, and (2) because she could.  It also proved she had enough steam to make it all the way from the bottoms to the summit while blowing the whistle.  Thanks for asking.  Things happen for a reason on the A&S.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on January 27, 2019, 01:57:12 PM
Love the story Bill and I can see that it took a lot of steam to blow that whistle that long.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 27, 2019, 03:35:34 PM
Miller - The steam was no problem.  There was an abundance of hot air in the shed Saturday.  More than enough for the whistle.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on January 27, 2019, 04:34:07 PM
 ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on January 27, 2019, 10:26:17 PM
 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 28, 2019, 04:00:43 PM
I forgot to show the SAL Geep at Summit.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/24-280119155752.jpeg)

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/24-280119155807.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: tct855 on February 01, 2019, 01:02:28 AM
Nice work T~.  The only layout in American with an actual mile of modeled track in a 1500' room. grin.  Keep up the great work brother!  KP-out...
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 01, 2019, 07:28:34 AM
Nice work T~.  The only layout in American with an actual mile of modeled track in a 1500' room. grin.  Keep up the great work brother!  KP-out...


KP1,

Thanks brother much appreciated. There is a lot packed into this small space.

KPII  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: vinceg on February 01, 2019, 08:45:58 AM
That really is a spectacular piece of engineering, Tom. I have never seen anything like it. Amazing.

You gotta track cleaning car, right?  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 01, 2019, 02:29:09 PM
Vince - The A&S does own a track cleaning car, but I am here to tell you we haven't used it on the ovalix for over two years.  Between DCC and WOW Sound's Keep Alive feature, we have very few stalls, even on turn-outs while running 0-6-0's. 

You do have a point.  I'll get a maintenance order off to the head of the A&S's MW Department, Will Fixer, and get him onto track maintenance right away.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on February 01, 2019, 03:25:54 PM
Vince - The A&S does own a track cleaning car, but I am here to tell you we haven't used it on the ovalix for over two years.  Between DCC and WOW Sound's Keep Alive feature, we have very few stalls, even on turn-outs while running 0-6-0's. 

You do have a point.  I'll get a maintenance order off to the head of the A&S's MW Department, Will Fixer, and get him onto track maintenance right away.

Assign Greg "Fireball" DeMayo as the engineer on the MOW train and the entire layout will be clean in 5, 10 minutes tops. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 01, 2019, 03:45:49 PM
I like "Fireball" Bob, it made me chuckle.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 01, 2019, 04:25:49 PM
it certainly has more appeal than "Crumbs"..... ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on February 01, 2019, 07:15:00 PM
Hey Tom:

Wow!!!!! That’s some track work.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 02, 2019, 01:51:14 PM
Hey Tom:

Wow!!!!! That’s some track work.

Karl


Karl,

Thanks my friend.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 02, 2019, 04:02:45 PM
Saturday, February 2,2019

Well, the track inspectors gathered at 0830 hours for the purpose of testing the new trackwork in the Summit area.  All possible moves through the reversing loop/wye were made without a hitch, although your reporter was advised that the success was achieved with care and a little trial and error in the wiring department.  Anyway, it is a thing of beauty, with each inch of track carefully laid without kinks or rough spots.  The 52" curve in place is a track to nowhere now, but it will eventually be the passenger car lead to the Union Station.  Tests were made.  An ACL Pacific with six passenger cars traveled from the Bottoms to Summit at speed step 35 in 17 minutes and 30 seconds.  An ACL freight of 19 cars and a caboose, powered by an A-B-A lash-up of F3's bettered the steamers performance, but those diesels are only a passing gimmick so not to worry.

Bob "Reading Bob" Butts paid the A&S a visit in time to make a run up and down the ovalix and got some experience throwing switches electronically.  Lunch break was at Smokey Bones.  The management accepts A&S pie cards.

 Some of the stories related on this weekly post will deal with special citizens who live and work, or don't work, in the Tahope County Area.  Today's post examines the owner of the dinner located on the south end of the road in the Midlands.  It also has passing reference to her two employees.
 
                                                                                                   SWEATY BETTY'S DINER

   Sweaty Betty's Diner is the only restaurant catering exclusively to railroad men and their families near the Sanlando Classification Yard.  Her customers mostly live and work in or near the yard, or are members of train crews passing through.  One was married to a brakeman.
   Betty is of late 40's vintage, with high mileage and the shape of a ripe Florida grapefruit.  She positions herself by the cash register in the dinner and spews insults at her customers when they complain about the food or the service.  Betty bathes infrequently and her aroma blends nicely with the restaurant's smell of stale coffee, fried food and day-old beer.
   The menu at Betty's Diner is simple. It reads,

   Breakfast   $1.50
   Lunch        $2.00
   Supper    $3.00

   You get what you get at Betty's.  Food here would shock anyone with a preference for gourmet fare.  Breakfast usually includes fried eggs, bacon, grits, and toast.  Coffee is so hot it will sear your throat.  It's as thick as #40 motor oil, and as bitter as a two-timed girl-friend. Lunch can be burgers and fries or the "Blue Plate Special," on Fridays which includes Betty's meat loaf, which would convert a cattle rancher into a vegetarian.  Steak and potatoes are optional at supper, but most customers go for the fried catfish, grits, and lima beans.  It saves wear and tear on the teeth.  Everything on the menu is fried except the iced tea.
   The cook is s greasy, tall, skinny drink of water, named "Bo," who wears baggy overalls and a soiled undershirt.  He greats customers by lifting his nose and nodding in the customer's direction rather than uttering a verbal welcome.
   The waitress is an elderly soul, affectionately known as Ptomaine Tessie.  She is friendly enough, but forgetful and sometimes sloppy when serving the food. 
   Sweaty Betty's was quite busy during the war years, but the customer base has slacked off as the troops and troop trains have disappeared.  Sometimes even the rats fail to show up. 
   Betty is designated by the A&S to accept "pie cards" from railroad employees in lieu of cash payment.  The amounts are deducted from the employee's next payroll check.
   Betty has a working relationship with the Tahope County Restaurant Board and the inspectors tend to overlook minor infractions in return for a slice of Betty's lemon pie.
        Betty is accepting reservations for the upcoming Valentine's Day celebration.  Call early.  Last year's celebration resulted in six arrests and the brakeman's divorce.  Witnesses said, after a few beers the brakeman pulled out his wallet to pay Betty, turned to his wife, and said, "Hey, you wanna see a picture of my girlfriend?"  She was arrested for assault and battery.  He was hospitalized.  A good time was had by all. And everyone arrested made bond.   










Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 02, 2019, 04:10:56 PM
I heard it said that the cuisine at Betty's will stick to your ribs.....although it has been known to be responsible for some disastrous bowel distress.....great story Bill.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 02, 2019, 09:13:32 PM
Another great tale Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 03, 2019, 06:39:53 AM
I want to thank my friends for pointing out my misspellings and grammatical errors in this week's report - especially my wife, who noticed I spelled "diner" "dinner."  I guess I need an editor - I have made a number of corrections to this week's story. 

The Atlantic & Southern is set in the early 1950's.  The characters who live in Tahope are mostly happy swamp dwellers who hunt and fish in lieu of working at a full-time job, much as their forefathers did before them prior to the coming of the railroad.  These types were in greater abundance back in the early 50's than they are today.  Now they have compensation from the government and have blue tooth in their pickup trucks, so they are much more sophisticated.  Betty's Diner closed forever in 1960.  The city fathers had tried to close her up for years without success.  What finally got her was lack of revenue, forcing the bank to foreclose the mortgage.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 03, 2019, 08:33:13 AM
I'm kind of disappointed.  I thought any errors in grammar and spelling were to add some 50's local atmosphere to the A&S.  Um, localspeak, so to speak.   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 03, 2019, 10:33:58 AM
That really is a spectacular piece of engineering, Tom. I have never seen anything like it. Amazing.



Vince,

Thank you, it sure was fun to build and it did take a few months. Greg DeMayo designed it for the A&S RR, so the credit goes to Greg.

Also, it's fun to watch the trains going up and down.

Tom  ;D



Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on February 03, 2019, 11:46:30 AM
Great Story Bill, I hope you never run out of Topics.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 09, 2019, 10:12:18 AM
Saturday, February 9, 2019.
There is no Saturday Report on the progress and adventures of the Atlantic & Southern today because it is the day for the Babe to travel to Mt. Dora for a hair appointment and Tom travels with her for protection. 

I do have a story, albeit a short one, that has to do with one of the A&S engineers.  This guy really lives and breathes his calling to the high iron.  Here goes:

One of the most senior engineers on the A&S is Reginald "Fatso"Johnson.  He's been a railroader for nearly fifty years and riding on the right side of the engine for over thirty.  Railroading is in his blood.  He always "talks engine" about his own anatomy, clothes, food, and drink.
 
He refers to his hat as his 'dome casing;' his brotherhood pin is his 'number plate;' His coat is "the jacket;" his legs are the "drivers;" his hands are the "pins;" his arms are "side rods;" his stomach is the "firebox;" and his mouth the "pop."  He refers to a missing suspender button as a "broken spring hanger;" his limp is a "flat wheel;" he "fires up" when eating; he "takes water" when thirsty, and he "oils around" when tasting whisky.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 10, 2019, 05:09:56 PM
Bill,

Thanks for mentioning Fatso. He is one salty cuss with his 50 years on the job, including the 30 years on the right. All the engineers lean towards the right on the Atlantic and Southern RR.

It might be time to pension him off.  8)

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 16, 2019, 05:05:31 PM
Sorry, faithful followers of the Saturday Report.  The Report is delayed until tomorrow (2-17-19) due to the amount of material available and time restraints due to out of town company.  Try tomorrow after noon.

The Judge
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Bruce Oberleitner on February 16, 2019, 05:44:13 PM
the AMOUNT of material available.  Sounds likes it's going to be another barn burner of a report.

 ;D ;D :o

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 17, 2019, 08:08:25 AM
THE SATURDAY REPORT - FEBRUARY 16, 2019
   The Saturday session of the management of the A&S Railroad started at 8:15 a.m.  A newly delivered SAL Citrus Scheme E4 B unit was examined.  It was manufactured by Baldwin Locomotive Industries (BLI) and will receive an upgrade to a decoder from TCS WOW Sound before entering actual revenue service. 
   The gandy dancers and the civil engineers have been very busy this past week.  Considerable track has been laid at the Summit level (the three levels of the railroad will be referred to in this report as "the Bottoms," "the Midlands," and "Summit.")  A complete description of each will be the subject of later reports.  Additionally, seven, count 'em, seven switch machines have been installed, all but one of which functions off of the controllers.  The lone hold-out is unfortunately located over a wooden brace and cannot be activated by a Tortoise machine without serious modification of the structure.  Fortunately, it is located at the aisle edge of the railroad so it can easily be worked by the "five finger method."  By-the-way, that method is used exclusively on the midlands Tahope Branch because all of the switches are within easy reach.  A similar system is in the planning stage for the yard at Summit.
   The CEO decided that it was time to run major trains from the Bottoms to the Summit so we pulled the Pennsy's Broadway Limited out from its storage area in the Bottoms and ran it up the Ovalix to the Summit.  The trip was smooth as silk and the passenger cars negotiated the Summit wye without difficulty.  Backing into what will eventually be the passenger lead to Union Station was a breeze, as it should be, with a lead radius of over 50 inches.
   Next, we decided to make the same test with SAL's Orange Blossom Special and achieved the same results.  We backed in, pulled in and tested every possible move in the Summit area and were completely satisfied.  The trackwork is as close to perfect as 1950's engineering can devise and this area of the railroad will eventually be a spot people will really admire.
   We sent the Blossom down to the Bottoms and decided to run a steamer up the Ovalix.  ACL P5A Pacific 1559 was selected to do the job pulling a head end car and seven heavy weights.  The smooth and steady 1% grade up the Ovalix proved to be too much for the steamer so a helper was recruited to assist in the form of the A&S’s newly upgraded B&O E-27 2-8-0.  This little fella provided just the right amount of power and pushed the train slowly up the Ovalix.  The trip to the Summit was interrupted by the arrival of Greg (Fireball) DeMayo.  Since 1559's rate of climb did not suit Greg, it exited the Ovalix at the Midlands and was spotted at Sanlando Station awaiting further orders.
   Gregg wanted to run a passenger train up the Ovalix and C&O's George Washington was selected.  This crack passenger varnish is powered by an A-B-A set of F3's and sported 11 cars.  Normally, A&S management limits the speed on the Ovalix to speed step 25, but Greg insisted on making a fast run and set the speed at speed step 50.  Happily, the train tracked perfectly and the passengers survived without injury.
   By the time the George Washington was returned to its spot in the Bottoms, it was nearly 11:00 a.m. and, after a little switching in the service area of Tahope, the crew headed for lunch at Smokey Bones.  We were disappointed to learn that our favorite server, who is very efficient and not without physical charm, had taken the day off.  But the food was good and the B.S. was about normal.
   After lunch, we decided to try sending a freight train from the Midlands to the Summit and selected a brace of ACL F3's in royal purple and silver for the trip.  The trip was without incident and should probably not deserve mention except to remark that the track leading off the Ovalix at the Summit is long enough to hold a long freight train, at least a train as long as is reasonable on the A&S.  A mark of the serious progress that has taken place in the past week.   

   Well, the hurricane season will soon be upon us again and this week's story involves one of those events of nature that occasionally visits Central Florida.  Most of us would rather ride out a hurricane than put up with the ice and snow our Yankee friends are experiencing this winter.  The tragedy known as The Tahope River Flood will be retold for generations to come.  Here it is in abbreviated form:

                                                                                                      THE TAHOPE RIVER FLOOD

   The A&S Superintendent of Maintenance, Will Fixer, hired Princeton Penman to keep an eye on the track gangs and report on both progress and irregularities involving work assigned to them.  Penman was better educated than most A&S employees and he excelled at preparing written reports.  These reports tended to be very detailed, and included the most insignificant information.  (Penman later went to work for Microsoft.) The Super called Penman on the carpet on several occasions to complain about the length of his reports.  The Super wanted reports that briefly stated the necessary facts without including unnecessary verbiage.
   That summer, Hurricane Annie swept through Central Florida and, with winds of over 70 miles per hour and eight inches of rain, causing the St. Johns River to rise and overflow its banks, flooding the nearby swampy areas, including some of the A&S right of way.  The Super needed a report to submit to management surveying the extent of the flooding in order to justify estimated repairs.  Naturally, the Super selected Penman to do the job. 
   Now Penman was one who took his job seriously and he was determined to accurately report the extent of the flooding caused by the hurricane with the brevity demanded by the Superintendent.  After a thorough investigation, and after gathering a significant amount of information, he finally submitted his comprehensive report.
   The Superintendent was impressed with the completeness of the report as well as its brevity.  The Board of Directors awarded Penman the A&S Outstanding Employee Pin for his report, which read in its entirety as follows:

   To:   Superintendent Will Fixer
   From:   Princeton Penman
      Sir:   Where the railroad was, the river is.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 17, 2019, 08:51:25 AM
Fireball here.....the ole' C&O named passenger train "The George Washington" used a powerful ABA combo of diesels to take the grade in grand fashion yesterday and kept the speed up to maintain the tight passenger schedule.

All aboard the crack train agreed that the ride was silky smooth and approved the timely arrival at their destination. A report of a higher than usual rate of alcohol consumption in the club car will be investigated.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 17, 2019, 09:01:03 AM
I just watched the whole adventure. No brag, just fact.

T  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 17, 2019, 09:45:14 AM
Another great adventure Judge. At least "Fireball" didn't mess anything up! ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on February 17, 2019, 12:21:53 PM
Have we created a "Fireball Express" on the Ovalix  8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on February 17, 2019, 01:09:37 PM
As a point of historical insignificance, I had the pleasure of riding the real C&O George Washington home from college several times.
One section departed Louisville, KY where I boarded while section 2 departed from Cincinnati, OH with the trains club car.. The eastbound train was then joined at Ashland, KY.
The trips home at Christmas were particularly enjoyable as we were accompanied by large numbers of recently discharged troops from Fort Knox (Louisville) who celebrated their newly returned freedoms. The real George Washington race took place between Ashland, KY and the West Virginia border. Due to tax and archaic blue laws, the alcohol in the club car was turned off at the border. Celebrating ex-GI's had lots of cash but little time to party. Made for some interesting trips.
Back to you, judge.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 17, 2019, 02:21:03 PM
Those of you who have actually ridden on the C&0's George Washington know it terminated in Washington, D.C. and not in a Central Florida swamp.  However, few people know that the 1970's merger of the numerous  roads, including the ACL, SAL, L&N, and C&O, was anticipated by the Atlantic & Southern.  Accordingly, it frequently happened that the George Washington would come south to A&S tracks during the busy winter season in the early 1950's, leaving northern Washington politicians stranded.  The C&O hoped that rerouting the George Washington would teach them a lesson and make them treat railroads with the same generosity as the trucking industry, but we all know how that turned out.

Good to hear from an actual GW rider.  The only thing worse that a bunch of hemmed up drunk G.I.'s is a bunch of hemmed up sober G. I.'s who wish they were drunk. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on February 18, 2019, 05:35:16 AM
Great report on the A&S Judge!  Sounds like the Ovalix is working as the engineers had designed & built it.  The flood report was spot on...Mr. Penman sure has a way with words.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 23, 2019, 05:35:26 PM
The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report for February 23, 2019, will be delayed until February 24.  This edition has photos and your reporter is having difficulty (again) figuring out how to post them.  Seems like this could be much easier.  But I am going to master this process! 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 23, 2019, 05:46:45 PM
The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report for February 23, 2019, will be delayed until February 24.  This edition has photos and your reporter is having difficulty (again) figuring out how to post them.  Seems like this could be much easier.  But I am going to master this process!


Oh no, not again!

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 24, 2019, 08:57:11 AM
The Saturday Report - February 24, 2019

The Saturday Session of the A&S Railroad started right on time at 0830 hours.  After some BS and a review of the excellent progress addding three turnout motors and signals, it was determined that the Florida Special, composed of nine heavy weights and a brace of three F2 ACL diesels, should climb the ovalix from The Bottoms to the Summit and so it began its climb at speed step 25.  As the trail approached The Summit, the "B" unit started making an unusual, loud electrical kind of noise as if the decoder was dying.  The unit was removed and replaced in position a few minutes later.  Apparently, it repaired itself. 

Another heavy weight passenger train, the Southland, joined the parade at the Sanlando Station.  it was a 10-car consist powered by ACL 1559, a Class P5A Pacific.  The weight was just too much for 1559, so the consists were switched and 1559 was coupled onto the Florida Special.  All went well after that.

"Reading Bob" Butts showed up in time for lunch so we adjourned to Smokey Bones for our noon repast. 

Grimlins attacked when we returned to railroading.  A mysterious short caused the railroad to shut down.  After much investigation, the cause was discovered.  An intermittent short was caused by some defect in the newly acquired A&LM ten wheeler.  This engine was sent to the shops at Ucita Yard  for repair. 

After the short problem was solved, the CEO made a second effort to train your reporter on how to attach photographs to these reports.  This time he was successful to some extent. 

The story this week introduces you to two of the characters that live at their fish camp located on the Tahope River in The Bottoms.  Clovis and Boone are big, strong men, who gained their muscles working lumber in Piney Woods.  They also obtain "corn squeezins" from the idle folk who live in the woods and have a still.  Anyway, these two guys are not dangerous, but they can be persuaded to get involved in questionable behavior.

 
                                                                                                          THE CONTEST

One day toward the end of summer, 1950, passenger service picked up on the A&S, mainly because of rerouting due to labor troubles on the FEC.  This caused considerable confusion requiring baggage to be transferred to a different baggage car in Sanlando..  Naturally, the Sanlando Baggage Master needed help to complete this task so the he hired two muscular guys, Clovis and Boone, as part-time baggage handlers.

Rumor got around that these two bozos were going to have a contest to see who could load the most baggage the fastest.  Clovis had a reputation of being able to chuck a Saratoga trunk into a baggage car with more force and greater damage than any other baggage smasher in Tahope County.  But some of the interested observers thought Boone could "fire more baggage into a car in five minutes than Clovis could in half an hour." 

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240219081952.jpeg)

Bets were placed and, sure enough, the first passenger train to arrive was Number 92, the East Coast Champion, powered by two FEC "E" units.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240219082208.jpeg)
 
Our heroes unloaded the baggage car on the Champion and piled it in two immense piles by the baggage car scheduled to make the trip to New York.  Many types of baggage were in the piles, including canvas covered trunks, fine leather two-suiters, and "Georgia traveler" held together with twine.  There were even some wooden crates and barrels from Key West, filled with salt water trout and grouper, destined for fast delivery to New York's finest restaurants.  The crowd gathered ‘round the baggage car and at exactly 3:26 p.m., the New York bound section of the Champion pulled into the station and the doors on its baggage car were thrown open.  The sound of gunfire started the contest.

Clovis pounced on a good-sized, old-fashioned valise, bound together with clothesline and, after spinning it over his head two or three times, hurled it into the car, causing it great damage, much to the delight of his admiring public.
 
Boone had not been idle.  He humped himself over a large trunk, and bending his back into the work, sent it to the rear of the car.  It was admirably done, and it would take at least an hour to collect the contents scattered in one brief moment.
This spurred Clovis to greater efforts.  He lifted a Singer Sewing Machine to his shoulder, winked confidently to his admirers, and let her go.  Pieces of cast iron went everywhere.

Then Boone snatched four ladies' valises and with no apparent effort heaved them into the car.  The dresses and fancy under garments looked right in place with the other debris.
 
Most of the bets were in favor of Clovis by that time but Boone was not to be denied.  Before the 30-minute shot was fired, he had turned four small wooden trunks into kindling, leaving one corner of the car completely filled with wearing apparel, broken umbrellas, and cooking utensils. He also rolled a barrel full of fresh fish with sufficient force to splinter it, scattering trout and grouper all over the floor of the car.
 
As a final demonstration of prowess and dexterity, Clovis thought he cinched the contest by handling two large trunks as though they were paper weights, scattering bonnets, panties, and feminine dry goods, all through the car.
 
When the final shot was fired, both the men gleefully grabbed up an ancient valise, owned by some rural citizen, and "let ‘er go."  The dry goods, shoes, tinware, and groceries burst their bonds, to the delight of the multitude there assembled.

The contest was declared a draw and both contestants were rewarded with cold beer and the title of National Baggage Smashers before they caught an outgoing freight and headed back to their fish camp for some turtle Stew.
 
Some months later, Clovis and Boone were hired by Herndon Airport in Orlando as baggage handlers.  Some of their grandchildren work at Orlando International today, but now-a days their specialty is loading baggage on the wrong flight instead of damaging it.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 24, 2019, 09:17:31 AM
Hey, Clovis and Boone aren't still hanging around in the baggage car are they?

No, they're off drinking "corn squeezins" at the fish camp.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/24-230219135313.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 24, 2019, 09:31:18 AM
Sounds like the insurance and lawyer guys are going to be busy with the aftermath of this episode.....great yarn Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on February 24, 2019, 10:02:16 AM
Several years ago I flew into and back out of the Orlando airport.  I often wondered why I had baggage issues there and at no other airports.  I understand why now that I know the "rest of the story".
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 24, 2019, 10:11:14 AM
Another great story Judge.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on February 24, 2019, 10:50:17 AM
Another wonderful story! 

I must admit, I'm beginning to get a little concerned that those electrical gremlins seem to only appear when I visit.  I didn't touch anything!  I swear!   :o
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 24, 2019, 12:30:18 PM
Bob, Curt, Greg, Jerry, and Tom - Thanks for the kind remarks.

As far as the rest of the story goes - I suspect some of our friends "up Nawth" will have questions like why would FEC "E" units be pulling the ACL Champion into Sanlando Station.  And why would there be a need to change baggage cars in the first place? 

The answers are not obvious, but have a lot to do with Florida railroading, which, like other Flori-duh things, needs explanation.  The ACL's Champion is the railroad's premier deluxe passenger train.  One section of the Champ (East Coast Champion)  originates in Miami and the other (West Coast Champion) originates in St. Petersburg.  The two sections meet in Jacksonville, where they are combined for the remainder of the trip to New York and Boston.  The East Coast Champion normally takes FEC trackage to Jacksonville, and, through a pool agreement, motive power is sometimes ACL and other times FEC.  This arrangement allows the train to service Florida's Gold Coast from Miami through Ft. Lauderdale, Palm Beach, Cocoa, Daytona, Palatka, and St. Augustine, up to Jacksonville.  It also allows the ACL to service St. Petersburg, Tampa, Lakeland, Orlando, Winter Park, Deland, and points north into Jacksonville.  ACL power takes over in Jacksonville and carries the train through to Richmond.  At that point, the Pennsy takes over into New York.  Normally, in 1950, the Champ's motive power is an A-B-A E6 lash-up, but from 1938 until recently, a single ACL R-1 4-8-4 could handle the 20-car consist all the way to Richmond without stopping to get water or coal.  Those were the days and maybe they will be depicted here in a future report.  For now, here is a shot of 1809.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240219122658.jpeg)

As for the change of baggage cars . . . . Your reporter contacted the FEC dispatcher in Miami (the FEC Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers is on strike) and he stated that the East Coast Champion was being crewed by scab labor on the day in question and, being somewhat inexperienced, failed to notice a hot box on the lead truck of the regular baggage car.  By the time it was discovered, the car needed to be replaced and sent to the repair shop.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on February 24, 2019, 12:57:31 PM
Great story Bill.  I hope you never run  out of topics.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 24, 2019, 01:27:36 PM
Thanks, Jim.  I have a lot of stories in the bag and more come to me every day.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: RWL on February 24, 2019, 03:28:07 PM

Bill,


Another great tale that you have expounded, you have a very creative mind.


To the explanation of southern traveling. I traveled on the West Coast Champion to St. Pete to visit my grandparents back in the 50s, I truly enjoyed the French Toast in the diner. I was also amazed by street running down 4th, I never saw that back in New York, I couldn't get over seeing cars pass us as I was looking down on them.


One comment about your story, I don't think the RF&P Brotherhood of Engineers will appreciate your disregard for their efforts in Richmond. None the less a great explanation on Florida railroading and the trials and tribulations of the rails.


Bob
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 24, 2019, 05:00:05 PM
Another wonderful story! 

I must admit, I'm beginning to get a little concerned that those electrical gremlins seem to only appear when I visit.  I didn't touch anything!  I swear!   :o


Not to worry Bob.....I'll probably get blamed in absentia (didn't think I knew that one did ya Bill).  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 24, 2019, 05:04:24 PM
Greg - People shouldn't be blamed for what they can't help.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on February 24, 2019, 06:03:07 PM
Judge - Your stories are the highlight of my Saturday. You have a great talent. Thanks for efforts. Do you compose after going to lunch and having barbecue and suds?! Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Bruce Oberleitner on February 24, 2019, 07:05:20 PM
Btw, I think some of Clovis and Boones grand children also work at Ohara airport in Chicago.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 25, 2019, 06:58:29 AM
Jim and Bruce - I'm glad you enjoy reading the Saturday Report.  Amazing that I haven't insulted anyone - at least not yet!

I get some of my ideas from a book my father gave me years ago entitled "Railroad Folklore."  I take a story and work it into a 1950 setting involving the A&S.  My grandfather was a conductor on the ACL back before WWI.  He was also the mayor of Lakeland, Florida, which was a division point in those days and he served a term in the Florida Senate.  My dad loved trains and used to take me to the Orlando station on Sundays to watch the the trains come through.

Not to worry - I have plenty of stories in the pipeline and won't run out of them anytime soon.  I will be concentrating on the people who live in and around Tahope for the next few weeks.  Clovis and Boone are only the beginning.



 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on February 25, 2019, 07:07:00 AM
Another interesting and entertaining back story Bill, really brings Tom's A&S alive for us all.


And like others, I very much look forward to your Saturday report.
Thanks and be well,
--Paul
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 25, 2019, 08:39:42 AM
Greg - People shouldn't be blamed for what they can't help.


I like the wisdom in your words.....but I don't think that defense would work in court.  :'(
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on February 25, 2019, 09:38:37 AM
Greg - People shouldn't be blamed for what they can't help.


I like the wisdom in your words.....but I don't think that defense would work in court.  :'(

Ignorance of the Laws...……..

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on February 26, 2019, 07:08:48 AM
Another excellent Saturday Report!  You really do a great job spinning those tales based on the stories in the Railroad Folklore book into tales of the 1950s.  Great pics as well!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 26, 2019, 09:12:14 AM
Greg - People shouldn't be blamed for what they can't help.


I like the wisdom in your words.....but I don't think that defense would work in court.  :'(

Ignorance of the Laws...……..

Jim


After 200+ years of bureaucrats and lawyers, at the local, state and federal levels, pumping out rules and regulations, I can't see that old notion working Jim.  ???
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 02, 2019, 04:58:43 PM
Atlantic &Southern Saturday Report March 4, 2019  (Partial report)

     The management & staff of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad met briefly at 8:30 a.m. this morning.  The discussion centered on the design of the main freight yard that will be constructed at the Summit.  (For new readers, the A&S has three levels which are referred to as the Bottoms, the Midlands, and the Summit.  These levels are reached by travel up and down on an "ovalix" that makes ten revolutions of twenty-six feet each and rising a consistent grade of one degree.)
    There was also a discussion about signaling at the Summit level.  A semaphore will be installed near the throat of the passenger car lead to Union Station.  The CEO demonstrated the new double target signal recently installed on the west side. 
    The initial effort to power the railroad came up short.  A pesky intermittent problem seemed to resolve itself, but bears further investigation.
     A Seaboard GP7 pushed a cut of freight cars around the 50+ inch radius curve leading to Union Station.  Then it traveled down the ovalix to the Bottoms where it was spotted in the staging yard.  It is a pleasure to watch such smooth, graceful operation.   
    Curt Webb arrived about 10:00 a.m. and sat on the right side of the cab of a long coal drag as it worked its way slowly all the way from the Bottoms to the Summit.
Then we all went to lunch at Smokey Bones and called it a day.

       There is more to this report.  However, there is something wrong with the Forum program and I cannot attach photos.  I checked with Tom (ACL1504) and we fiddled with the problem for about 30 minutes with no results.  I have notified the administrator.  I'll try again tomorrow morning and if the photos can't be attached, I'll go without them.  Try back around 11:00 a.m.

       Sorry about that!

       The Judge

   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on March 02, 2019, 05:15:41 PM
Great report Judge! You guys sure seem to be having fun. I'm looking forward to your pictures.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: EricQuebec on March 02, 2019, 05:26:50 PM
Objection your honor. It appears that this report is falsified because backdated 2 days. How can we relate facts that have not yet occurred? :) :)
Eric


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on March 02, 2019, 06:13:16 PM
Good evening Bill (Judge),
Your 'Saturday Report' is now somewhat akin to a weekly radio show.  Something to look forward to all week, very entertaining and not to be missed as we hear more about the comings and goings of the cast of characters that made up the A&S during a bygone era.
I (like many others here) look so forward to your weekly missives.
Just wanted you to know and please keep at it,
All the best to you, Tom and the entire A&S Crew,
Sincerely,
--Paul
newly of Marshfield, MA
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 03, 2019, 07:18:25 AM
Eric - Picky, picky, picky. We don't worry about little things like accuracy on the A&S.  Ignoring it makes the whimsy more whimsical.   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 03, 2019, 08:07:19 AM
The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report for March 2, 2019 (continued)

I have added the pics. 

Recently, your reporter began to introduce the readers to some of the inhabitants of Tahope County who live in the Midlands.  Sweaty Betty and her diner were described in detail.  Introductions will continue over the next few weeks, and perhaps a tale or two will be told about the characters you have previously met.  Today we meander down the mainline from Sweaty Betty's, passing Sanlando Station, to Eaton's Curve.

                                                                                                The Inhabitants of Eaton's Curve

Perhaps you have heard the name "Florida Cracker." The name comes from the 1880's when Florida's version of cowpokes lived in the Central Florida area.  The sound their whips made when they herded cattle was a "crack;" hence the name.  Many of their ancestors live in Tahope.  They drive pick-up trucks with rifle racks in the back window and hunt alligators, deer and ducks.    They have Confederate Flag license plates on the front of their trucks.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-030319214830.jpeg)

There are two "cracker shacks"on Eaton's curve.  These shacks have been in place for many years and are in need of indoor plumbing and general maintenance.  There is a small cornfield located adjacent to the lot on which the shacks are located.  A good bit of the corn finds its way to Piney Woods where "idle folk" have a still and make mighty good corn squeezins. The residents of Eaton's Curve have "tied in" to electric power provided by the Tahope Power Co.  The power company does not charge them for electrical usage because they are not listed as customers.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-030319213358.jpeg) 

Most "working folks" in Tahope County are related to each other some way or another.  Their family trees have very few branches.  Sweaty Betty has a sister named Tallula who lives with her common law husband, Luke, in one of the Cracker Shacks located on Eaton's Curve.  Luke, makes a living harvesting blue crabs from his crab traps on the St. Johns River.  The crab traps sit on the river bottom with a "float" attached to mark their location.  The traps are baited with chicken necks Luke gets from Farmer Perkins in exchange for a share of the crabs.  Florida is the only state in the union that makes it a felony to "molest a crab trap," so Luke guards his traps with a shotgun from a flat-bottomed boat to ward off would-be crab molesters.
 
Tallula spends her days mostly cleaning their shack and doing laundry, which she takes in from neighbors to supplement the family income.  Her washing machine is on the front porch and the clothes line is located behind the house.  Coal dust from passing steam locomotives give her "whites" a distinctive grey color.
Luke and Tallula have a son named Newton Ray Lee, but his friends call him Newt.

Newt is tall, strong, and surprisingly verbal.  He tried to join the navy during the War, but was turned down when he flunked the psychological test.  (He has a pathological fear of accomplishment.)  He is pushing 30 years of age and has never had a job that lasted more than a week or two.

Vergil Turner and his wife, Daisey, live in the other shack on Eaton's curve.  (Daisey's kin tend to name all their wimmin young'uns after flowers or plants.)  Vergil is Luke's half-brother.  They have a son named Donny, but his friends call him Short Stack.  Short Stack is a few years younger than his cousin, Newt.  When Daisey, who is blond, thought she might be pregnant with Short Stack, she went to the Tahope family practitioner, Dr. Minnie Staysic, to find out.  After Dr. Staysic confirmed Daisey's condition, she asked her if she had any questions.  Her only question was "Is it mine?" Short Stack inherited his mother's intelligence.

Short Stack helps Luke harvest crabs sometimes and other times he rides in the truck with Vergil down to the Sanlando Depot to help him clean the place up.  Short Stack gets $.87 an hour for his labor, which he likes to spend at the pool hall in Tahope.

Recently, Newt and Short Stack "went to railroading."  They bummed around Florida looking for odd jobs in railroad yards and accumulating minor criminal charges.
 
Disappointed in their career advancement, they have abandoned all full-time employment and have "taken up as homeless vagabonds" in the Bottoms of the A& S Railroad, where they subsist on odd jobs, petty thefts and the fish and other critters they can catch.  They sleep in a lean-to covered with Palmetto fronds.  They keep a fire going in front of the lean-to, with a pot of hot Mulligan stew simmering from dawn until late in the evening.

The vittles are shared with other vagabonds, hobos, and bums who pass through the Bottoms, hoping to nail a ride on a "Pullman Box Car" to parts elsewhere.  The Mulligan stew is "help yourself," provided each hungry traveler contributes something to the pot or shares a bottle of shine from Piney Woods to take the edge off.

Short Stack is in charge of "obtaining" the ingredients for the Mulligan stew when other drifters are not about.  He gets fish, crabs, and turtles from the Tahope and St. Johns Rivers and traps small gators.  The turtles and gator tails dress nicely for the stew and the fish are fried over the fire. (Gator tails taste "just like chickin.")  The crabs are boiled in river water.  Short Stack's Aunt Betty occasionally gives him one of her pies to take back with him for after dinner.

All-in-all, life is good for Newt and Short Stack, at least for now.  More later on their adventures.



Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on March 03, 2019, 08:37:41 AM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 03, 2019, 09:23:31 AM
Another good one Bill..... ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on March 03, 2019, 12:12:38 PM
Love the story Bill.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 03, 2019, 02:34:16 PM
Paul, Jim, Curt, Greg, et al.  - Thanks for the kind remarks.  I enjoy doing the Saturday Report.  It is a challenge to find material, but so far no problem.  When I run out of ideas I will consult the Trains app on my computer.  It has many years of Trains magazines and I'm sure I will find stories in them that apply to the A&S.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Oldguy on March 03, 2019, 05:08:16 PM
All good stories.  They even sound plausible.  Gnat and I can relate to most of them as both of us live in Hillbilly country.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 03, 2019, 09:52:27 PM
GOOD NEWS!  THE REPAIRS(?) HAVE BEEN MADE AND THE PICS HAVE BEEN INSERTED INTO THE SATURDAY REPORT.  THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE!

The Judge

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 09, 2019, 05:10:13 PM
The Saturday Session of the A&S started promptly at 0820 with a discussion about the plans for the main freight yard, which will be located on the east side of the Summit.  The trick is to keep it simple and yet keep it functional.  Plans are not settled but concepts are formulating.
    The first move was to return the Sharks and their coal drag from the Summit to the Bottoms.  This occurred without a hitch due to the excellent design of the Ovalix and the meticulous track-work laid out by the A&S gandy-dancers. 
     Next a POL train composed of tank cars was brought from the Bottoms to the Summit.  It was powered by two ACL GP7's and made the trip without incident. 
      An express reefer freight was scheduled after the POL train, powered by an A-B-A brace of SAL F3's.  Lack of maintenance was the apparent cause of the trailing A unit to fail to respond to the throttle.  We have experienced decoder failure with some of our older TCS WOW decoders and the decoder in this unit was one of our older ones.  It seems they fail while they are in storage for a time.  This unit had not been run in several months.  The good news it that TCS replaces the defective decoders without charge and usually includes an upgrade.  We have not had any problems with replacement decoders.
    The remaining working F3A unit (the B unit is a dummy) powered the reefer consist without difficulty but couldn't make it up the 1% grade on the Ovalix without help, which was provided by an SAL GP7.
   Lunch was at Smokey Bones, as usual.
    After lunch we scheduled a steam powered passenger train, composed of heavy weights and powered by an ACL P5A Pacific.
   No meeting scheduled for next Saturday.

   Today's story has a smatter of truth to it in that it vaguely resembles one of the many murder cases I tried while I was on the bench.  Barlow's Bar-B- Que is a hotspot in Tahope and provides full Saturday night service with food, drink, dancing, pool, and pin ball.  Sometimes the locals get a little rowdy and this story takes place on a Saturday night after our heroes have had a hard week cutting timber in Piney Woods.                                                                               

                                                                                     THE BARLOW'S BAR-B-Q SHOOT-OUT

March is sometimes quite balmy in Central Florida and so it was in 1950.  The oak leaves were still falling, but it was not yet Spring, so it was too early for pollen.  With the humidity over 90% in the evening, it was not unusual for local Tahope residents to take to Barlow's Bar-B-Q for a few "cool ones" and some of Bob Butt's famous ribs. The Super Saber sauce is so hot it makes your forehead sweat and your ears turn red.
    On this particular evening, Bruce Bonebreaker and Sam Savage, both of whom worked timber in Piney Woods, commenced to drinking about dusk and decided to try a game of pinball for a quarter a game.  The more they played, the more they drank and the more they drank the louder they got, until a crowd gathered, causing quite a disturbance. 
   Bruce allowed that Sam had cheated by lifting the pinball machine off of the floor to his advantage, and Sam called Bruce a "no good, lying so and so," or maybe something worse. The argument escalated until one or the other of them threw the first beer bottle.  The fight was on and some of the supporters for each belligerent joined the fracas. 
   The owner calmly suggested the fight should be moved outside by displaying his 12-gage shot gun, so the crowd spilled out into the parking lot. 
   There the fisticuffs turned into a brawl.  Bruce grabbed a 2x4 and swung it towards Sam.  Sam pulled his deer skinnin' knife and commenced to carve on Bruce's mid-section.  At that point, Bruce pulled out his pistol and fired it point blank at Sam.  The bullet made a loud crack as it hit its target between the eyes.  Sam fell to the dirt with a thud.
   About the time the fatal shot was fired, the Tahope Police arrived on the scene.  Upon being advised of the situation and upon viewing the corpse, Officer Poovey decided to arrest the survivor for the Murder of Sam Savage.
         
         The top photo shows the overall crime scene. (Please note that the yellow coupe, driven by one of our subjects, ran through the parking lot fence.) The bottom photo is a close-up of Officer Poovey's arrest of Bruce for Sam's murder. 

           (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-090319170836.jpeg)

           (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-090319170005.jpeg)


                 
   Now Bruce did not intend to take this incident laying down, so he hired the only criminal defense lawyer in the City of Tahope, Marvin Bello, who immediately mounted an argument for self-defense. 
   The trial was scheduled a few weeks after the arrest and the events described above were placed before the all-male jury.  The coroner testified that Sam died as a result of a gunshot wound to his brain, which he said was somewhat smaller than the average.  The presiding Circuit Judge, Honorable Elvin P. Thomas, had been on the bench since 1918 and it was not his first murder trial.  At the judge's direction, Brass spittoons were strategically placed in the jury box and at the bench.  Judge Thomas always had a chaw of tobacco and he could make a spittoon ring with every shot. 
   When the time came, Judge Thomas instructed the jury as follows:

   "Now, gentlemen, afore y'all convict the defendant of this here murder, you first have to decide if the decedent deserved to be kilt." 

A Not Guilty verdict was soon returned, to the loud approval of the citizens present.
   The crowd adjourned and accompanied Bruce and Marvin Bello to the bar located in downtown Tahope, where they celebrated the victory without further incident.  And Judge Thomas took the A&S local mixed train back home to Sanlando, while sipping bourbon and playing poker with the mayor and other local politicians on the way.
   


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on March 09, 2019, 06:12:27 PM
Ahhh,
Southern justice.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Jim Donovan on March 09, 2019, 10:19:12 PM
But the question remains, did Sam actually lift the pinball machine as accused or was he simply a man who brought a knife to a gun fight?

Given the poorly maintained condition of Barlow’s facility it is just as likely the floor sagged at the right moment, due to the large group of people jumping up and down watching the match and thus tilting the machine to Sam’s advantage. What happened next is well documented, much to Sam’s demise.

I expect we might hear more on this subject due to the widow Savage and her 13 children having lost husband and pappy. He might have been a poor excuse of a man, a drunkerd, womanizer and mean but he was their source of income, such as it was, and widow Savage expects Barlow’s to do her right.

Just saying...
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on March 09, 2019, 10:28:13 PM
Love the story Bill.  Sounds like some personnel experience might be part of the History between Bruce and Sam.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 10, 2019, 08:57:39 AM
The rest of the story. 

Jim Donovan is right!  The tragic death of Sam Savage had a devastating effect upon his widow and 13 children.  She hired attorney Larry Lickem, who successfully sued the ACL several weeks ago in that unfortunate accident involving the caboose that fouled the track at the Piney Woods Station.  Lawyer Lickem proceeded to sue Barlow's, Bruce Bonebreaker, and Regressive Insurance Co., whose motto is "You Pay and We Don't."  Sam only made minimum wage, less than a dollar an hour in 1950, and he had no pain and suffering due to his instant demise, so the damages in his case depended upon the widow's "loss of services."  With 13 kids, it was obvious that Sam provided better than average services and the jury, angry at the insurance defense lawyer, made sure she was more than adequately compensated.  However, the court of appeals substantially reduced the award, leaving the widow with only several million dollars.  She subsequently married SAL fireman George "Crack a Diamond" Musselwhite (Remember George?) and provided him with six more head of young 'uns.

However, Jim is wrong in his analysis about whether or not Sam actually lifted the pinball machine to his advantage.  In self-defense cases, truth is a matter of perception.  It matters not if the pinball machine was lifted.  The only question was whether Sam "deserved to be kilt."  The jury found he did deserve his fate and the community was better off without the shiftless, no-count SOB. 

Oh, yes, I almost forgot, Bruce Bonebreaker "drug up" and moved to the Florida panhandle where he went to work cutting timber for the St. Joe Paper Company, whose trustee was also the trustee for the FEC.  So Tahope got rid of both of these characters and it was a better place for it.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on March 10, 2019, 09:24:48 AM

Judge,


I would like you to show more sensitivity when referring to the locomotives in service on the A&S.  You referred to a specific B unit as a "dummy".  It would be better, at least in my opinion, to refer to it as "unpowered" since there is no proof that this particular B unit is any less intelligent than an A unit.  Now, if you would want to share the standardized test scores of both the A and B units involved, I might have to retract my objection. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on March 10, 2019, 10:01:34 AM
"The rest of the story" reminded me of my time on a jury.  In Virginia, the plaintiff isn't allowed to ask for specific amounts.  Well, the defendant hit the plaintiff (with her car.)  It was clear she didn't want to be in court, she was only there because her insurance company made the case go to jury trial.  The plaintiff laid down his medical expenses and lost wages, and we went into the jury room.  Our deliberations included making sure the plaintiff got all his expenses covered, and then we threw in another $20k because the insurance company would pay, and they were real a-holes! 


Afterwards, the plaintiff's attorney called to get feedback on what worked and didn't work.  I was really impressed with him, I made sure I got his phone number, in case I had to sue someone.


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on March 10, 2019, 10:37:32 AM
Another great story. I love the staging of the crime scene.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 10, 2019, 11:16:29 AM
They keep getting better and better Bill..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 10, 2019, 01:15:24 PM
Jerry - I guess the age of political correctness has even touched model railroading.  I hope an inanimate object like an unpowered plastic model diesel is not offended by my use of the term "dummy."  Perhaps "Locomotively challenged" or "unmotorized placeholder unit" or "non-functional-but-pleasing-consist-enhancer" would be a more appropriate.  For this defalcation, I humbly apologize.  However, I may retain Lawyer Lickem and sue for defecation of my character.     
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on March 10, 2019, 03:59:45 PM
"motive-challenged power"?


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 11, 2019, 08:59:30 AM
Jerry - I guess the age of political correctness has even touched model railroading.  I hope an inanimate object like an unpowered plastic model diesel is not offended by my use of the term "dummy."  Perhaps "Locomotively challenged" or "unmotorized placeholder unit" or "non-functional-but-pleasing-consist-enhancer" would be a more appropriate.  For this defalcation, I humbly apologize.  However, I may retain Lawyer Lickem and sue for defecation of my character.   


Oh boy..... ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on March 11, 2019, 02:52:58 PM
These stories just keep getting better and better, as do the comments.  ;D

Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on March 11, 2019, 03:21:56 PM
I have one of those lazy locomotives on my railroad.  Just will not pull its own weight.  Great report!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on March 12, 2019, 08:35:53 AM
Jerry - I guess the age of political correctness has even touched model railroading.  I hope an inanimate object like an unpowered plastic model diesel is not offended by my use of the term "dummy."  Perhaps "Locomotively challenged" or "unmotorized placeholder unit" or "non-functional-but-pleasing-consist-enhancer" would be a more appropriate.  For this defalcation, I humbly apologize.  However, I may retain Lawyer Lickem and sue for defecation of my character.   



Your honor,
I place myself at the mercy of the court.  While I felt it my personal responsibility to address the mis-characterization of the B unit as a "dummy", in no way did I intend to imply that the court was less than objective in its ruling.   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on March 12, 2019, 10:16:48 AM
Hey Judge:

Love the BBQ kit. You did a great job with it.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 12, 2019, 03:57:33 PM
Karl - No, no, no, no!  I take no credit for the Bar-B-Que joint!  That is the creation of Robert "Redding Bob" Butts, Grand Poo-Bah, Master Model Builder and all 'round good guy.  Bob is also the whimsical owner of Barlow's.  Its motto is "We have the best butts in Tahope County."  That is true in more ways than one on most Saturday nights.

Alas, my model building ability is amateurish to say the least.  Perhaps I will delve into kit building after I retire again.  Meanwhile, I am quite happy being allowed to discuss construction plans for the A&S and doing goffer work like populating passenger cars.  Also, get a great deal of pleasure from running trains. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 16, 2019, 04:05:08 PM
There is no Saturday Report for today because the wife of the Atlantic and Southern's CEO had her monthly appointments in Mount Dora.  Your reporter spent most of the morning watching U-tube train videos and adding another tale to my list of future publications.  This week's story is a detour from my description of folks who live in the Midlands of the A&S and requires a journey to that dark and somewhat dirty place called "The Bottoms." 

For those readers who are new to this report, a quick explanation is needed about A&S terminology.  The A&S Railroad exists in three levels -  The upper level is known as the Summit and is under construction.  It will eventually be an urban scene with a major freight yard, a passenger station, and a diesel service facility.  The middle level is known as "the Midlands" and is a rural scene with a number of places of interest, including a passenger station, a small freight yard, a freight station, a wooded area, and a farm.  The City of Tahope and a major steam service facility are located on the branch line.  The lower level is a staging yard with nine tracks on the east and west sides of the railroad.  It is known as the Bottoms and is the subject of this week's story.  It is suggested that newbie readers consult with a previous edition entitled Inhabitants of Eaton's Curve (Page eight) for background information.

Let the story begin!

                                                                                                      LIFE IN "THE BOTTOMS"

Life is hard in The Bottoms.  Daylight never shines in the place and it is only partially illuminated.  It was not designed for human habitation.  It is a staging yard that runs under the entire length of the Atlantic & Southern and holds trains awaiting call.
 
Trains are stored there for days or weeks until called when needed.  There are no hostlers to tend to the fires in the Bottoms, so the steamers are cold and so are the diesels.
 
Though the environment is hostile and facilities are scarce, a variety of transitory types inhabit the Bottoms on a more-or-less regular basis.  Most of these individuals are hobos, but some are tramps and some are bums.  These characters tend to look alike to the casual observer but there are differences.  A hobo works and wanders, a tramp dreams and wanders, and a bum drinks and wanders.  Most of them carry their "possibles" in a bindle composed of a sack or handkerchief tied to a stick for carry on the shoulder.  All of them share the same mode of transportation, that is hopping a freight or an occasional passenger train to "get wherever its going." Some have more success than others when hitching a ride.  A famous hobo named "A No. 1," who thrived in the decade before WWI, claimed he traveled 500,000 miles for $7.61.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-160319155618.jpeg)

Here you see the camp in the Bottoms.  Short Shack is on the far left.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-170319062449.jpeg)🤷‍♂️
Hobo with a bindle

Hobos pick up odd jobs and know where to find a place to sleep out of the weather at night because other migrants have left messages identifying friendly spots on freight station walls, water tanks, or sign posts.  Before WWI, every experienced wanderer had a "little red card" with him identifying him as a member of a railroad brotherhood.  Even at this late date, 1950, this identification sometimes convinces railroad personnel to allow the presenter of the card to have free passage. 
Hobos used to call obtaining free passage on an outgoing freight train "nailing a drag." When steam was in its heyday, heavy freight trains accelerated slowly out of the yard, so talented transients could obtain passage on a "Pullman boxcar" with relative ease.  The art was in determining just when the "drag" was at a speed that was too dangerous to chance.  "Missing a drag" usually resulted in scrapes and bruises from falling into the track ballast or, not infrequently, more serious injury. 
By 1950, the population of migrant boomers and homeless transients had significantly dwindled.  The post-war economy was better and it was more difficult to "hitch a ride" on the faster diesel-powered freights.
 

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-160319154610.jpeg)
Nailing a drag
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-160319154828.jpeg)
Missed the drag and ended up on the ballast
 
 
There are a few places left that cater to "Kings of the Road" and one of them is the Bottoms of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad.  Usually, on summer evenings, a number of "Bos" can be found huddled around a fire over which is simmering a pot of Mulligan Stew. The proprietors of this camp are its semi-permanent residents, Newt and Short Stack.  Others tend to drift in and out as their travels dictate.  All of the campers go under assumed names or monikers because a number of them are running from something.  So, names like Chicago Dan or St. Louis Slim are common.  Identification by a place of origin gives one a sense of well-being.
Mulligan Stew is a staple dish in the Bottoms.  It is composed of water and almost anything else available that is edible. 

On this particular day, Newt was able to buy a couple of chickens from farmer Perkins with the day-labor wage he received yesterday, for sweeping up at the A&S round house.  Short Stack was able to capture one of the turtles that are plentiful in the rivers of Florida.  Others managed to beg or steal local fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, corn, celery, beans, and onions, all of which were added to the pot.  Somebody managed to procure a quart size Mason Jar of "corn squeezins" from the still in Piney Woods, so the atmosphere was relaxed and friendly.  Everybody was welcome, provided each person contributed something to the stew.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-160319160043.jpeg)
Short Stack dressing a turtle for the Mulligan Stew


After dinner, long about 7:00 p.m., the Bo's heard the disinctive sound of EMD 567 diesel engines "cranking up."  Sure enough, a freight drag was leaving for the Midlands.  Although the Tahope County topography is essentially flat and is only a few feet above sea level, the trip up the ovalix to the Midlands requires multiple diesel units, or helpers for the steamers.  This drag was powered by an A-B-A lash-up of F3's.  It eased off about 100 yards from the yard throat and accelerated rapidly. 
The Bos wanting a ride had to "nail" it before it got to moving too fast.  Fishmouth Ferguson, an experienced Bo, spotted an open box car door and made a dive for it just as the drag passed him.  Tampa Turkey, who was not so experienced or observant, grabbed for a ladder on a box car and slipped into the cinders.  He suffered lots of scrapes and cuts, but nothing was broken.
 
As the drag approached the yard throat switch, it slowed to a crawl.  The other Bos saw their chance and climbed aboard, some in box cars, some in gondolas, some up on the tops.  Unfortunately, the reason for the slow approach to the yard throat became apparent when six "Railroad Dicks" watched the Bos get aboard.  The drag came to a complete stop at the yard throat and most of the Bos scampered off the train.
 
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-160319155428.jpeg)
Thrown off the train by the Railroad Dicks

 "All in a day's work," said Fishmouth, who managed to purloin a couple of bottles of California wine from his box car before he disembarked.

   The Bos returned to their camp, caught a little shut-eye and waited for another drag. Newt and Short Stack waited until everyone was snoring and proceeded to rifle through Fishmouth's bindle and scored a bottle of wine.

   Life is what you make of it in the Bottoms.


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on March 16, 2019, 04:22:11 PM
Great story your Honor!   :D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on March 16, 2019, 04:25:09 PM
There is no Saturday Report for today because the wife of the Atlantic and Southern's CEO had her monthly appointments in Mount Dora.  Your reporter spent most of the morning watching U-tube train videos and adding another tale to my list of future publications.  ...

Ah, what my wife calls "Choo-Choo Porn."  (And we know what Justice Potter Stewart said about porn. :-) )

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 16, 2019, 05:02:20 PM
Civilians need to be careful if they wander into the Bottoms.....some really strange people down there.  :o
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on March 16, 2019, 05:19:52 PM
Great story Bill. You are really talented telling tall tales.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on March 16, 2019, 09:10:49 PM
Great Story Judge! I'm really enjoying your thread.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on March 16, 2019, 09:28:39 PM
Thanks Bill,
Another wonderful story presented vividly and cleverly.
--Paul
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 16, 2019, 10:21:41 PM
Bob, Greg, Curt, John, and Paul - Thank you for your kind comments.

Dave - I didn't intend the tale to be "Choo-choo porn."  But I guess writing about dirty bottoms and railroad dicks could be taken the wrong way.  I withhold my opinion about Justice Potter Stewart in deference to the dead.  But thanks for taking the time to reply.  Famous authors wallow in encouragement from loyal fans.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on March 17, 2019, 06:50:10 AM
Another great story Bill.  I really enjoy following along on the journeys that you weave here.  The pictures really add to the whole scene.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on March 17, 2019, 07:47:33 AM

Sorry I missed all the fun. I spent the day riding on the Pennsy.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on March 17, 2019, 10:21:53 AM
Another great tale, especially with the period photos.


Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on March 17, 2019, 11:24:42 AM
Bob, Greg, Curt, John, and Paul - Thank you for your kind comments.

Dave - I didn't intend the tale to be "Choo-choo porn."  But I guess writing about dirty bottoms and railroad dicks could be taken the wrong way.  I withhold my opinion about Justice Potter Stewart in deference to the dead.  But thanks for taking the time to reply.  Famous authors wallow in encouragement from loyal fans.


I was referring to watching train videos and reading train books, not the subsequent story.   So I move for dismissal of the charges, Your Honor!


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 18, 2019, 03:34:09 PM
Dave - Case dismissed without costs, sine die!  Sorry, I "tuck it the wrong way"  Keep following - we venture back into the Midlands next Saturday.   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 23, 2019, 03:45:51 PM
   The Saturday Session on the Atlantic & Southern was busy and exciting today.  Your reporter arrived at 0820 hours ready to inspect the completed mainline on the Summit level of the railroad.  The track was in place with nary a rough spot or a kink.  The basics of Ucita Yard were in place and it appears that the yard tracks will be six in number and stretch about 16' in length.  There will be a yard lead, caboose track, and a stub for switchers.  The yard will extend to the South end of the property where a major diesel repair facility will be located.  Your reporter ran an SAL GP7 with 16 cars and a caboose without difficulty and the CEO called out a long freight powered by ACL Purple and Silver F3's. 

The A&S was borrowing a NYC Hudson for testing.  It ran well enough, but its TCS WOW Sound decoder needed volume adjustments.  That is not a problem with WOW Sound.  The decoder's program gives voice instructions and the master volume was increased to an appropriate level in no time.   Greg "Fireball" Demayo arrived on the property about 1030 hours and had a go at running the Hudson around the Midlands.  Then the crew high-tailed it to Smokey Bones for lunch. 

After lunch, the management agreed to allow "Fireball" to run his Hudson up the Ovalix from the Midlands to the Summit at speed step 99.  He said he wanted to see if it would stay on the track.  Your reporter envisioned centrifugal force causing the Hudson to fly into the blue yonder but she tracked exceedingly well.  However, this will be the last time such an experiment is allowed on the A&S..

This week's story is of young people in love.  The young man in the story appears to be driving his father's 1950 Buick Roadmaster. My recollection of the favorite car was the 1957 Chevrolet.  Anyway, I don't remember any kids in my era being as law abiding as these kids.

                                                                                                  LAW ABIDING CITIZENS

The mainline of the Atlantic & Southern passes Barlow's Bar-B-Que and crosses Mosquito Lagoon over a bascule bridge.  It passes Delwin's Fish Camp and approaches the Piney Woods Freight/Passenger station.  It is a whistle stop for passengers and usually the only train that stops there is the Sanlando Local Mixed Train. 

Piney Woods was a New Deal project.  The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) planted numerous pine trees in neat rows during 1934, and they have matured into full grown trees.  No one actually lives in Piney Woods, but some "idle folk" have built a still in the woods where they produce "mighty good 180 proof corn squeezins," aged in pine barrels for up to two weeks before being distributed in pint size Mason jars.
   
Late one evening, Officer Eldridge  Poovey, of the Tahope Police Department, was on routine patrol in the vicinity of the Piney Woods freight station.  There had been reports of suspicious activity in the area.  He noticed there was a car parked back up in the woods.  It was well off the road and the interior light was on.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-230319154110.jpeg)
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-230319153845.jpeg)
       
Officer Poovey approached the vehicle out of concern for its occupant's' safety and well-being and noticed there was a young man in the driver's seat reading a Mechanic's Illustrated magazine and a young woman sitting in the back seat filing her fingernails. 

Officer Poovey tapped on the passenger side window.  The driver reached over, rolled down the window, and said, "Yes, Officer, is there something the matter?"  "No," said Poovey, "I was just checking to make sure you were alright.  Do you mind if I ask, what are you doing?" "Well," said the young man, "I am reading this Mechanic's Illustrated magazine. "And the girl?" "Oh, she's filing her nails." 

With this information, Officer Poovey believed further inquiry was in order.  He said to the driver, "Young man, how old are you?" The driver answered, I'm 22."  "And the girl, how old is she?" "Oh," said the young man, looking at his watch, "she'll be 18 in 12 minutes."

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 23, 2019, 04:24:06 PM
The last time......maybe, but the official speed run from the Bottoms to the Summit is still in the offing..... ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on March 23, 2019, 06:57:02 PM
Another fine report. I'm enjoying your stories Judge.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on March 23, 2019, 07:01:14 PM
Sounds like a grand time and "Speedball" must have been ecstatic  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on March 23, 2019, 07:57:49 PM
I gotta believe that was the longest 12 minutes of that young man's life.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 24, 2019, 01:38:12 PM
                                                                                                      THE REST OF THE STORY

The young man's name is Terrell (Tater) Cartwright and the girl's name is Peaches.  Peaches is a niece of Luke and Daisey Turner, who live on Eaton's Curve..  (All the "wimmin" young'uns in that family are named after flowers or plants.)  Tater is a promising young man who is employed by the A&S Railroad as a roundhouse mechanic's helper. Peaches, who is slightly cross-eyed, is a cheerleader at Tahope County High School.

Here is a picture of "Tater" working in the A&S Roundhouse.  "Tater" is on his haunches by the low pressure cylinder on the 2-6-6-2, which is A&S Number 7.
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240319132639.jpeg) 

This, of course, is Peaches.
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240319134305.jpeg)



Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on March 24, 2019, 05:51:17 PM
Judge you continue to provide great stories. Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on March 25, 2019, 07:09:02 AM
I love the latest tale from the A&S!  Keep 'em coming!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 30, 2019, 10:43:10 AM
  The Atlantic & Southern's CEO and the Babe are off property today visiting Tom's older sister in South Carolina.  It's a trip that allows you to enjoy both I-4 and I-95.
There will be a regular session of the A&S management and crew next Saturday.  A&S's 2-6-6-2 will be out of the shop by then and will probably make a revenue run with pulpwood (There's a lot of pulp wood in Florida - its where paper comes from.)
  However, in spite of Tom's absence from the railroad, your reporter has not been idle.
 
FYI, the A&S is proud to have TCS WOW sound in all steam and diesel locomotives that are in regular service - and that is a bunch of them.  We have been in contact with TCS for the past couple of years, whining about the fact that sound for Baldwin diesels is not available on their products.  NO MORE!  Soon our Sharks and Centipedes will be powered with real Baldwin sound!                                                                                                       

                                                                                                              Happy Days! 
                                                                             TCS WOW Sound now has Baldwin sound on their decoders.

I just learned that Train Control Systems now has decoders that have four different Baldwin prime movers and some Baldwin horns.  I heard the sounds briefly yesterday and I was impressed.  Unfortunately, I am not familiar with the nomenclature of Baldwin prime movers so I don't know which of them are available for, say Sharks, Centipedes, S-12's or V-1000's.  However, I have ordered two decoders (along with two of TCS's new super speakers) for intstallation in my BF-16 Sharks.Below is a web site that has a chart showing the various Baldwin diesels and the types of prime movers they used.  I understand that all of them were maintenance nightmares.  The Sharks, particularly, leaked oil.  Leak or not, they could lug coal hoppers better than the steamers they replaced.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Baldwin_diesel_locomotives

I also found some web sites that have Baldwin diesels, complete with sound. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdSSx6tNtpc (I think this one may have computer enhancement)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpuEPoEIB9I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNhcjDGg2zo

This week's story is one of the triumph of the weak over the strong - Little A&S takes on the big Jacksonville Steamship Company.

                                                                                             THE BRIDGE OVER THE TAHOPE RIVER

   The Tahope River is fed from the mighty St. Johns, which flows north from Florida's Gold Coast to Jacksonville.  The Tahope River branches off of the St. Johns and meanders west into Sanlando.  The earliest railroad bridge across the Tahope River was constructed in 1903.  It was a wooden structure containing many thousands of feet of creosote treated timber and many tons of iron.  Over the years, it became rickety and would not hold the weight of A&S locomotive traffic. Finally, in 1948, the old bridge was replaced with another wooden bridge.
   The citizens of Tahope were happy with their new bridge, but the happiness was not universal.  The bridge passed over the Tahope River at such a height as to preclude the passage of most river traffic in route to Sanlando.  And there was considerable traffic diverted from the St. Johns to the Tahope River in those days.  The traffic included not only steam boats carrying passengers up and down the river from Jacksonville, but also included freighters transporting agricultural products "up Nawth."  Thus, shippers were precluded from using the Tahope River to transfer their products to Jacksonville, and were forced to ship them by rail, using the Atlantic & Southern Railroad.
   Enter the Jacksonville Steamship Company, whose board of directors insisted the Trustees of the Florida Intrastate River Commission abate the bridge as an obstruction to navigation.  The A&S immediately filed a lawsuit in Circuit Court through its attorney, Marvin Bello, seeking to enjoin further interference. 
   While the suit was pending, one of the Steamship Company's ships attempted to pass under the bridge and, not surprisingly, collided with it.  By accident, the ship caught fire and the flames ignited the underside of the wooden bridge.  The bridge was destroyed before the City of Tahope's 1923 firetruck could arrive on the scene and extinguish the blaze.
   The railroad and the steamship company reached a settlement whereby the steamship company would pay for a new steel bridge that would not be a fire hazard, and the A&S agreed to dredge six feet from the river bottom under the bridge, to allow clearance for the company's vessels.  The settlement resulted in the completion of the present bridge in 1950.  The outcome of the case was publicized far and wide, and has been used to this day as a model for Congress to successfully compromise partisan differences. 
    And Marvin Bello became the first citizen in Tahope County to own a Cadillac automobile.

                                         
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-300319104208.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on March 30, 2019, 06:14:50 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: tct855 on March 31, 2019, 03:39:07 PM
Your Honor,
               With an imagination like yours, who needs to hear the facts! (grin)  When it comes to hearing fake news or fake stories, I like your stories because the facts sound so believable and the tone and demeanor are very fiduciary.

That's it, I'm giving up reading my novels and sticking to this thread here on out!  keep your hand on the whistle and pull hard on the throttle Judge.  Thanx Thom...
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 01, 2019, 08:45:39 AM
Ole Marvin is quite the scamp..... ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Jim Donovan on April 01, 2019, 09:36:28 AM
Once again a great story that highlights the progressive and flexible nature of Florida jurisprudence. I wonder if by chance the ship involved was, shall we say, ‘dated’ but fully insured for this type of untimely end? I suspect that might have been the case though my own dealings with insurance companies is they are even better at getting out of paying then they are at selling the policy to begin with.

Jim D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 01, 2019, 10:00:16 PM
                                                                                                 The Rest of the Story

While I seldom include a personal note on any of my Saturday missives, I need to celebrate this particular April Fool's Day.  For it was on April Fool's Day, 1969, (fifty years ago) while I was assigned as a staff officer in the Special Forces Headquarters at Ft. Bragg, N.C., that I received a telephone call from the Pentagon in Washington, D. C. , notifying me that I had come down on officer's levy for MACV (Military Advisory Command, Vietnam) and would be proceeding there in October.  Fortunately, my boss, who was the staff Adjutant General, knew the MACV Adjutant General and he arranged for me to be assigned to the General Staff in Saigon.  My year in Vietnam was more interesting than dangerous and, happily, I never had to fire a shot.  Funny, it seems like only yesterday.  But April Fool's Day every year means something special to me and that is why I am telling you.  It is also why, on my current Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report, a lawyer named Marvin Bello managed to get a Steamship Company to settle a dispute by having the City of Tahope dredge six feet of river bottom under a new bridge so the steamships would gain clearance.  Happy April Fool's Day!

And thank all of you who have taken the time to reply to my Saturday Report entries.  I appreciate your comments.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on April 02, 2019, 09:21:11 AM
I'm just waiting for the story that starts, "This is no s**t!"  :-)


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 02, 2019, 09:26:00 AM
Dave you must of been a sailor at some point.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on April 02, 2019, 02:19:35 PM
Dave you must of been a sailor at some point.
Nope, Army.  But the difference between a fairy tail and a war/sea story is a joint concept - it applies to all Branches of the Service.

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 06, 2019, 05:24:34 PM
The Board of Directors of the Atlantic & Southern met promptly at 0815 hours this morning and discussed a number of matters of interest.  Two new Baldwin prime mover decoders have been received by the A&S and will be installed in the railroad's leased Pensy Sharks.  The new SAL Citrus Scheme E units were received after being refitted with WOW Sound.  They run like a watch.  A&S #7, the 2-6-6-2,  was returned from Ucita Yard after out-shopping and she looks like new.  She hauled a pulpwood train from Sanlando up the Ovalix to the Summit without difficulty, although due to her low drivers, it took a full eighteen minutes to make the trip.  Greg would not like to run this locomotive.  Sufficient speed could not be attained, even at speed step 99, to suit Greg.  Lunch was at Smokey Bones, as usual.  After lunch, an ACL freight powered by an A-B-A set of F3's made the trip from Sanlando yard to the Summit via Piney Woods.  Those ACL diesels are really something else.

Number 7 looks brand new after shopping.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-070419160531.jpeg)

The lead ACL F3

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-060419171829.jpeg)

ACL freight through Piney Woods

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-060419172100.jpeg)

  This week's story is one that proves Murphy's law is alive and well.
                                                                                                            All in a Day's Work

   The workers on the maintenance crew at the A&S Roundhouse are a busy bunch on most days, and the day in question was no exception. 
   The single action air pump on number 1516 needed repair.  The headlight on number 431 needed a new bulb.  The valve gear on number 7 was out of wack and required the front low-pressure cylinder on the engineer's side to be disassembled.  And the airbrake line on number71 needed replacement.  All of this work needed to be completed by noon because the crew was scheduled to work on diesels at the "diesel lubritorium" located south of Bedford Forrest after lunch. 
   Will Fixer, the A&S Railroad's Head of Maintenance, was fit to be tied.  Two of his mechanics had called in sick this morning and he was short on hostlers.  Fortunately, "Tater" Cartwright was present for duty. (Many of the residents of the City of Tahope work for the A&S and most have last names describing medieval occupations.)  "Tater" never missed a day of work and was an up and comer on the maintenance crew. Fixer put him to work disassembling the cylinder on the 2-6-6-2, while the only hostler on duty banked the fires on the other engines spotted in the roundhouse. (See the previous photo of Tater on page 11 working on Number 7.)
   Occasionally, the roundhouse floor becomes so littered with dirt, grease, grime, and metal shavings that someone has to take the time to "sweep up."  So it was today, and Fixer, being short of help, decided to give a day's wages to Short Stack if he would lend a hand.  Short Stack, who was still a little hung over from the wine he swiped from Fishmouth's bindle, wrapped his hands around the handle of the broom Fixer gave him and started sweeping up the debris on the floor and loading it into a barrel. 
   Wouldn't you know it, about that time number 835 limped into the service yard with a broken spring hanger.  She was scheduled to power freight number 48 from Sanlando yard up to Summit at 12:30 so repairing her was a priority.  Unfortunately, all nine of the stalls in the roundhouse were full and replacing a broken spring hanger requires equipment that is not available on the A&S RIP track.
   Fixer looked for a hostler to move number 71 back out of stall number 5, but none was available.  His eyes fell upon Short Stack, who eagerly volunteered to back the engine out of the roundhouse.  Short Stack had been hired as a day laborer in the past and Fixer figured he knew how to back a switcher out of a roundhouse stall. Fixer gave Short Stack the go-ahead and drove to the freight station in Tahope to catch the local mixed train to Sanlando.
   Short Stack was in his glory!  Imagine, giving him the helm of a real live steam locomotive even for the short distance from the roundhouse to the turntable!  Short Stack enthusiastically yanked the whistle cord for three short blasts of the three-chime whistle and set the reverse lever in the back corner.  He cracked the throttle for a wisp of steam.  The engine slowly began moving towards the turntable. 
   The turntable operator, Tony Baker, noticed the engine backing towards him but the turntable was not in position for it to move onto the table.  So, Baker hollered to Short Stack to hold tight where he was until the table was ready.  Short Stack applied the engine brake and got nothing.  The air hose had not been repaired.  Slowly the engine crept back towards the pit and it became apparent that Baker could not get the table in place in time.  The rear truck on the tender dropped into the pit, which stopped the engine's progress. It also blocked number 835 from access to the roundhouse and it blocked any movement of the other eight engines.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-060419172247.jpeg)

   Short Stack, visibly shaken over the mishap, rounded up two other helpers to remedy the situation.  Tom Tanner, the assistant roundhouse foreman, telephoned Will Fixer, who was about to board the Sanlando Local mixed train to supervise the make-up of freight number 48 and somehow substitute another engine for that run if 835 wasn't repaired on time.  Tanner told Fixer that Sort Stack had backed the rear truck of 71's tender into the pit, which made Fixer furious.  Tanner tried to calm the situation by reporting that Short Stack and two other workers were rigging the hand derrick to re-rail the tender.  Fixer boarded the local and proceeded to the station at Sanlando.  He decided to place a call to the roundhouse and find out how things were going.  Tanner reported that the hand derrick was now in the pit.  He suggested that they send for the steam derrick.  At that, the pressure in Fixer's boiler rose to the danger point.  He ordered, "Leave the steam derrick where it is.  No more room in the pit!" 
   Short Stack managed to hike it back to the Bottoms before Fixer returned on the local, thereby avoiding any unpleasantness.  And number 71 was back in the roundhouse for completion of the repairs to its air line by the next morning.  It's all in a day's work.   

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 06, 2019, 06:13:10 PM
Another great story Bill about "A day in the life"
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on April 06, 2019, 06:25:11 PM
Yepper, twas a busy day all around the roundhouse and on the A&S RR.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on April 06, 2019, 10:35:48 PM
Thanks for the explanation Judge.
When I first saw the photo, I suspected a well known Florida speed freak had attempted an Evil Knievel type jump over the turntable pit. Aiming to put the loco in the proper stall with the brakes fully applied in mid air, he failed to allow for a sudden cross wind, and, as they say, the rest is history.
I like your version better. Thanks for keeping us informed.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 07, 2019, 08:59:20 AM
Hey Bill.....Ole' No. 7 might be fast, but she sure can pull a bunch of timber.....great steamer.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 07, 2019, 09:01:30 AM
Thanks for the explanation Judge.
When I first saw the photo, I suspected a well known Florida speed freak had attempted an Evil Knievel type jump over the turntable pit. Aiming to put the loco in the proper stall with the brakes fully applied in mid air, he failed to allow for a sudden cross wind, and, as they say, the rest is history.
I like your version better. Thanks for keeping us informed.


Not in this life with any A&S engine BandOGuy.....I have never had a Death Wish.  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: cuse on April 07, 2019, 09:34:59 AM
I've missed a lot of the recent SBG meets since I moved to the coast...The Judge's accounts here might be just as good as the real thing (minus the BBQ)  ;D


John
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 07, 2019, 04:12:55 PM
I have received a suggestion that the paint job on Number 7 is blue in color instead of black.  It must have been old Kodachrome film that decayed before developing.  I have corrected the color (sort of). 

Thanks for the comments.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on April 07, 2019, 04:20:05 PM
I have received a suggestion that the paint job on Number 7 is blue in color instead of black.  It must have been old Kodachrome film that decayed before developing.  I have corrected the color (sort of). 

Thanks for the comments.



Judge,


That's interesting.  I thought the engine was blue because it reflected the state that Greg has been in ever since he found out that #7 was his permanent engine assignment by A&S management to solve his "need for speed".
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 07, 2019, 09:51:14 PM
Jerry - A&S management is considering limiting Greg to speed step 25 for all A&S locomotives, owned or leased.  This will allow him to B. Y. O. L. (bring your own loco) if he wants to speed.  It's on the agenda for next Saturday morning. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 08, 2019, 08:20:12 AM
Jerry - A&S management is considering limiting Greg to speed step 25 for all A&S locomotives, owned or leased.  This will allow him to B. Y. O. L. (bring your own loco) if he wants to speed.  It's on the agenda for next Saturday morning.


25.....that's a bit drastic, isn't it.....how about 45?  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on April 08, 2019, 12:39:16 PM
Jerry - A&S management is considering limiting Greg to speed step 25 for all A&S locomotives, owned or leased.  This will allow him to B. Y. O. L. (bring your own loco) if he wants to speed.  It's on the agenda for next Saturday morning.


25.....that's a bit drastic, isn't it.....how about 45?  ;)

Don't worry.  You should be able to adjust the speed tables in the decoder to make 25 max out the engine.   ;D  ;D  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 09, 2019, 10:46:11 AM
Jerry - A&S management is considering limiting Greg to speed step 25 for all A&S locomotives, owned or leased.  This will allow him to B. Y. O. L. (bring your own loco) if he wants to speed.  It's on the agenda for next Saturday morning.


25.....that's a bit drastic, isn't it.....how about 45?  ;)

Don't worry.  You should be able to adjust the speed tables in the decoder to make 25 max out the engine.   ;D ;D ;D


Great lateral thinking.....thanks Bob.  8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on April 10, 2019, 01:05:37 PM
Jerry - A&S management is considering limiting Greg to speed step 25 for all A&S locomotives, owned or leased.  This will allow him to B. Y. O. L. (bring your own loco) if he wants to speed.  It's on the agenda for next Saturday morning.


25.....that's a bit drastic, isn't it.....how about 45?  ;)

Don't worry.  You should be able to adjust the speed tables in the decoder to make 25 max out the engine.   ;D ;D ;D


Great lateral thinking.....thanks Bob.  8) 8) 8)

OH, OH.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 13, 2019, 04:22:58 PM
4-13-19
The Saturday session of the A&S began on time a little before 0830 hours.  Oh! Happy Days!  The Baldwin Sharks are back from being refitted with TCS WOW Sound Baldwin decoders!  They also have the new CTS bass enhanced speakers, which are an improvement over the previous models.  The Sharks were put through their paces powering a 21 car coal hopper train with a Pennsy Mae West Caboose.  The Sharks sounded like they were going to self destruct any second, just like the prototypes, but they did not leak oil, at least not as far as we can tell.  The Sharks rose up the Ovalix from the Bottoms without incident at speed step 25, notch 3, and made a tour of the Midlands, including the City of Tahope and the steam engine facility.  Then the Sharks tackled the steady 15 grade from the Midlands to the Summit without incident. 

Curt Webb and Greg Demayo arrived on the property around 10:00 a.m. Speedball Greg wanted to run the sharks but had trouble holding them to lugging speed.  We took lunch at Smokey Bones as usual .  We continued to run the Sharks and did a little switching with #7.  [We broke for lunch at Smokey Bones, as usual.  After lunch, the new SAL E6 A-B lash-up took some turns around Summit.  The Citrus Scheme paint job is really stunning!  It was not rerouted down to the midlands for fear of collision with the Sharks, which were by now being run at speed step 50 by Greg.

                                                                                                        This Week's Story

A number of the higher paying jobs on the Atlantic & Southern, such as engineers, foremen, master mechanics and superintendents, are held by folks of Irish decent who migrated to Florida from railroads in New England and the Mid-West.  They are hard-working, hard-drinking sorts who provide the kind of labor a railroad must have to be a first-class operation. We will get a glimpse of these characters from time to time, beginning with this week's story of Irish close friendship and brotherhood.  It involves a bottle of "Fine Irish Whiskey," which, I'm told by Dr. Google, goes for up to $1100.00 a bottle.            

                                                                                       The Bottle of Fine Irish Whiskey

     Well, the Track Maintenance Foreman, Patrick O'Malley and his pal, Michael O'Toole, the Assistant Superintendent of Civil Engineering, had a busy week on the Atlantic & Southern.

    The gandy dancers laid a lot of track and installed a number of switches in the freight yard at the Summit.  Being Irish, they drank some, and when work was finally over on Friday afternoon, O'Malley suggested the two of them repair to the pub located in the downtown Tahope.
 
    Once they arrived at the pub, they ordered two pints of "black and tan" (a mixture of Guiness Stout and Bass Ale) and proceeded to relax.  They drank one, then two, and lost count of the number of pints they consumed.  As the bartender was about to close the place, O'Toole put his arm around his buddy's shoulder and said, "O'Malley, yuv ben a fine friend of mine all these years and I have a proposition to make ye.  Let's you and me go and buy a bottle of fine Irish whiskey and whichever one of us dies first, the other one will celebrate the passing of the dear departed by pouring the whiskey over his grave."  "Good idea," said O'Malley, and they made the purchase.
   As luck would have it, O'Malley passed away not long after the agreement was made.  O'Toole waited until the first full moon after O'Malley's funeral and approached the gravesite, which was covered with fresh grass.  He pulled out the bottle of fine Irish whiskey from his coat pocket, removed the cork and said, "Ah, Pattie, me darlin', I'm here to fulfill the pledge we made some weeks ago, and I'm going to pour this bottle of fine Irish whiskey over your grave.  But Pattie, I hope ye don't mind if I run it through me kidneys first."

                                                                      (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-130419161207.jpeg)


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 13, 2019, 04:37:42 PM
Harrumph......I thought I was well behaved today, but do I get credit for doing 10 street running in Tahope or keeping it at 15 around the roundhouse and thru the backside of town, No.....I get nailed for a short speed burst past that darn ole' farm. I didn't even go for a  record run up the Ovlix..... :'( :'( :'( ::) ::) :o :( :( :( .....pass the single malt.....none of that Irish stuff. ::)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on April 13, 2019, 06:05:06 PM
Hmm, I must have not been paying attention as I thought Greg only got the throttle up to 35 around PERKINS FARM!

As far as the O'Toole guy, I may have to reconsider his employment status.

The A&S did acquire three new ACL hoppers this fine day.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 13, 2019, 07:48:25 PM
Now that's funny. Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on April 14, 2019, 12:04:18 PM
Outstanding story Bill.  I hope Taphope never runs out of characters.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 20, 2019, 03:56:51 PM
Disclaimer - I set the photos for thumbnail this week by mistake.  Seems like I have a new problem with photos every week.  Sorrry.  Just click on them and they will grow in size - I hope.

The weekly train session of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad was a day early.  Saturday is the Babe's day for her monthly trip to Mt. Dora.  The session was productive.  The CEO's son-in-law visited and entertained us with his stories of youth and model airplanes.  Then we ran trains.  The WOW Sound Sharks made a tour of the railroad and were eventually spotted in the Bottoms.  The ACL P5A 1559 powered an eight car passenger train with Pullman heavy weights behind it.  This train, named the Florida Special, is diverted from its usual route through Tahope County due to yesterday's bad weather.  Your reporter decided to "fiddle" with the roundhouse turntable and determined that the AB&C 0-8-0, number 71, was acting sluggish.  The crew repaired to lunch at Smokey Bones and decided to investigate 71's problem upon return.  The loco was spotted on the program track where it was pronounced "dead."  Not to be defeated, we spotted it on the loop that goes around the roundhouse and it came alive.  Must be those Saturday gremlins or, more likely, it just takes time to get a cold engine up to steam.   

This week's story focuses on Perkins Farm.  The story introduces the reader to farm life in Central Florida in the early 1950's and provides a little opportunity for introduction to Florida Cracker cuisine.  All of the Perkins kin have names that start with "P."

                                                                                                             PERKINS FARM

  Perkins Farm is located South of Piney Woods and across the Tahope River on the East side of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/thumb_684-200419161712.jpeg) (http://www.modelersforum.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=38698)
This is a photo of the sleepy Tahope River.  Watch out for the gators!  They lurk under water.

  Farmer Patrick Perkins acquired the farm from his father, Percy Perkins, who bought the farm in 1905 when the Atlantic & Southern was just a short line.  Grandpa Percy still lives on the farm with the family.  The 300-acre farm has extensive orange groves and about 100 acres set aside for raising cattle.

 (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/thumb_684-200419153517.jpeg) (http://www.modelersforum.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=38693)
Looks like the oranges are ready for picking.  Local labor pitches in at pickin' time.


(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/thumb_684-200419155030.jpeg) (http://www.modelersforum.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=38695)
This view shows the proximity of the A&S mainline to the Perkins farm. 

 
  Farmer Perkins is married to Paula Dean Perkins, who is famous for her contributions to the cooking contest each year at the Tahope County Fair. She likes to serve "Good Old Florida Cracker Food," such as grits, swamp cabbage, fried soft shell crabs, turtle stew, and gator tail. Local wild duck, venison, and quail are also popular on her menu.  Stewed okra and tomatoes and corn on the cob are the preferred vegetables. That's good eatin'!
  Paula has a stand of cabbage palms growing behind the farmhouse.  The Florida Sable Palm has an edible "heart" that can be harvested, chopped, and fried (or stewed) with bacon, onions, and almost any other vegetable.  In fine restaurants "up Nawth" they call it "hearts of palm" and put it uncooked in salad.  But to Florida Crackers, it is plain old swamp cabbage and it is best served, like Paula serves it, fried or stewed.  The heart of a Florida Palmetto can be substituted for the heart of a Sabal Palm.  (More about swamp cabbage later.)
  The Perkins have three children:  Peter Perkins, age 16, Perry Perkins, age 14, and Patricia Perkins, age 12.  Patricia is called "Fatty Patty" by all who know her.
Pete and Perry "help out" their father with the chores on the farm.  They arise before sunup every day and put in three hours before breakfast, which their mother serves promptly at 7:30 a.m. during the week and 8:00 a.m. on the weekends.  Breakfast consists of orange juice, eggs, bacon, pork sausage, grits, and biscuits with orange blossom honey.  Sometimes fried catfish is substituted for the pork sausage.  Pete picks the oranges from the nearby orange grove and Perry squeezes the juice into a quart size jug.
  Fatty Patty is of the age when most young girls start to become a discipline problem.  She is supposed to help her mother with the cooking and cleaning but she has become extremely lazy and has to be "spoken to."  She whines a lot.  (The photograph shows Fatty Pattie sitting on her lazy patootie at the edge of the front porch, while being scolded by her grandfather, Percy Perkins, for not bringing in the laundry before the ACL afternoon freight stormed by, spewing boiler water and coal soot all over creation.)
 
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/thumb_684-200419154705.jpeg) (http://www.modelersforum.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=38694)
Grandpa is giving Fatty Patty a piece of his mind.  Farmer Perkins is sitting on the porch and Paula Deen Perkins is assisting Grandpa.  "If'n you won't even sweep the porch, there'll be no strawberry cream pie for desert."

  The children board the school bus promptly at 8:00 a.m. each day and travel the short distance to their schools in the City of Tahope.
There are more chores in store when the children get home each evening.  Fatty Patty has to help Paula fix “suppa” shelling peas, shucking corn, or going to the garden to pick okra and tomatoes.  She does these chores under great protest.  "Aw, Ma, do I have to?"  Usually, she loses her privilege to play her Victrola after "suppa" when she misbehaves. 
  Farmer Perkins has a couple of helpers who live on the farm, whose names are Tom and Vida.  Vida helps Paula with the cooking and cleaning.  Tom runs the tractor in the orange grove and helps Farmer Perkins tend to the fences and the cow pasture.  They live in a shack located back in the woods on the east edge of the farm.
On the surface, all appears to be tranquil on Perkins Farm.  But farming is a constant struggle getting crops and cattle to market and making ends meet.  A drop in the price of beef or a sudden hard freeze can put Farmer Perkins on hard times.
  Saturdays are the highlight of the week.  On Saturday mornings, Farmer Perkins loads the whole family in the pick-up and heads for downtown Tahope.  The family stops by the local department store (a new addition to Tahope) and the hardware store.  Lunch is served in the local diner and the kids go to a movie after lunch.  This week's selection at the movie theater is Walt Disney's Song of the South. The grown-ups stop by the public library and check out the latest publications to read during the hour of down time they spend each evening before going to bed.  (Television, is a new invention and no one in Tahope County has a television set.  The closest TV station is in Jacksonville and its range is far short of Central Florida.)

                                                                                             Paula Dean Perkins' Swamp Cabbage

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/thumb_684-200419155311.jpeg) (http://www.modelersforum.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=38696)
Sabal Palm

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/thumb_684-200419155421.jpeg) (http://www.modelersforum.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=38697)
Florida Palmetto

   From a palm and pine thicket at the back of Perkins Farm in Tahope County comes the sound of a machete. Farmer Perkins is there amidst the smoke and the mosquitoes--with sweat dripping off the end of his nose.
He has just chopped down a 5-foot Sabal palm tree, which lies at his feet, and his machete is now ripping through a segment near the top of the tree just below the leaves.
  He tears back the remaining stiff outer segments until a shimmering core is exposed. He now holds its ivory white heart in his hand.  That’s the tender part and it's sweet and edible.
  The next step is cooking the swamp cabbage. Local recipes tend to be of the ''add a little of this, enough of that and cook it until it`s done'' variety.
Paula Dean Perkins doesn't mind sharing her basic recipe for swamp cabbage, but she didn`t want to take credit for it.
   ''It belongs to the people of Florida,'' she said.
The tree selected for eating shouldn`t be too big, nor should it grow too near the water or the heart will be bitter.
  "Clean it right away and keep it in cold water until you`re ready to cook it or the dish will turn green instead of being white as it should be," Paula warned.
Fry some hickory smoked bacon or fatback in a pot, then brown chopped onions in the fat. Put in the swamp cabbage, broken into bite-sized pieces, and stir it awhile until it is just soft. Add water until it`s level in the pot with the swamp cabbage. Bring the water to a boil and cook the swamp cabbage until it`s tender. 
  Cook it too long and it will be a mess.   
  When serving, some people add a little Worcestershire sauce and a dash of Tabasco.
Raw swamp cabbage is appreciated by some of Florida's more uppity citizens.  It goes great with lettuce and tomato salads. Onions and green olives add flavor and pimento strips add color.  Your choice of salad dressing.


Here is Paula Dean Perkins' recipe for swamp cabbage (Hearts of Palm to y'all Yankees.)
SWAMP CABBAGE
Six servings
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 3 to 4 hours
6 slices smoked bacon or fatback (fatback preferred)
Onions
1 cup water
Small head swamp cabbage (cut out tender part inside the palm) or 2 cans hearts of palm
Salt and pepper to taste. 

1. Fry bacon until crisp in frying pan; drain and retain grease.
2.  Add swamp cabbage and fry until just soft.
3. Crumble the fried bacon and add to a saucepan along with bacon grease.   Simmer, covered, until tender. (Cooking time will be less if using canned hearts of palm.) Add water as needed -- Salt and pepper to taste.
Another authentic Florida recipe for Swamp Cabbage Stew is found at:
https://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Swamp-Cabbage-Stew
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 20, 2019, 04:07:54 PM
Neat background on the Perkin's clan Bill.....it's a good thing dinners only a couple of hours off.....all those great dishes makes a body hungry.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on April 20, 2019, 05:55:00 PM
That Patty is a sturdy girl, lots of "sturd".

(Yinzers of a certain age know from whom I stole that quote!)

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 20, 2019, 09:26:19 PM
Great story Bill. You have a great imagination.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on April 21, 2019, 09:32:44 AM
Another great story.  I hope those Perkin's folks know that bacon is bad for 'em.  So's eggs.  Heck, nothing's good for ya' these days.  :o
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on April 21, 2019, 06:54:31 PM
I look forward to your stories each week. Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on April 22, 2019, 07:26:33 AM
Another fantastic report Judge!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on April 22, 2019, 12:42:22 PM
Another great story.  I hope those Perkin's folks know that bacon is bad for 'em.  So's eggs.  Heck, nothing's good for ya' these days.  :o

What Bob said.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 24, 2019, 10:24:11 PM
I want to thank all of you who took the time to make comments about my Saturday Report.  I also want to thank the folks who took the time to view it.  There were over 200 of you this week.

I received my copy of RMC this month and was surprised to see the monthly Dremel award go to kit bashing an old Athern side window caboose to more closely resemble an NC&StL caboose.  Then I read the copy that accompanied the article.  It referred to the NC&StL as the North Carolina and St. Louis.  Now that slip really got to me.  For those who don't know the fantastic history of the Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis RR, I should tell you it went from Atlanta through Chattanooga and Nashville to Memphis.  It never came close to North Carolina, or St. Louis for that matter.  I emailed the editor of RMC and pointed out the error.  Do you believe it, he emailed me back and said it was the biggest goof the magazine has ever made.  I replied that if that was his biggest goof he should thank his lucky stars.  I wish my biggest goof was something like that.  I just hope the guy who kitbashed the caboose didn't think he got the name right.  North Carolina indeed!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 27, 2019, 05:48:33 PM
ATLANTIC & SOUTHERN SATURDAY REPORT 4-27-19

The board of Directors of the A&S met promptly at 8:30 a.m.  All board members were present, including Tom, the CEO and your reporter, who is the ticket agent.

Much progress was reported for the week.  The Summit is now a separate power district.  The ACL Champion, with a lash-up of A-B-A E7’s and eleven cars was summoned from the Bottoms to traverse the track on the Summit and it arrived without a hitch.  The SAL freight spotted on the Summit did a turn or two.  Bob “Reading Bob” Butts arrive around 10:00.  Greg DeMayo arrived soon thereafter.  Meanwhile, #7 was fired up for a turn around the Midlands pulling a pulpwood train. Then the crew went to lunch at Smokey Bones.  After lunch, there was a general discussion and Greg ran the SAL freight.  He was stopped for speeding but was let off with a stern warning.  The group broke up about 1:45 p.m. without incident.

This week's story is about one of the most important members of a passenger train crew, at least from the 1870's until the 1950's  - The Pullman Porter

                                                                                                PULLMAN PORTERS IN THE 1950'S.

   The Pullman Company had stringent requirements for its employees.  In the segregated South (and even in the Nawth) of the 1950's it was difficult for black folks to get a job that paid  above minimum wage and did not involve manual labor.  Pullman offered a path to at least modest success and hired black men as porters, chefs, and waiters on the trains.  Competition for these jobs was fierce and only the applicants that met Pullman's high standards were hired.  Pullman claimed porters were trained to be "the perfect servants" They certainly had ability to get along with difficult guests and possessed the patience of Job.  Some of the porters went on to work for luxury hotels and one porter, J. W. Mayes, served President William McKinley in his sleeping car and then accompanied him to the White House where he served eight presidents over four decades.
   Porters had a variety of duties including welcoming their passengers, stowing their luggage, seeing to their whims, preparing their beds in the evening, and even shining their shoes.

                                                                   (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-280419122340.jpeg)


   This photo, taken about 1915, could be representative of this scene for the next 50 years.  As Lucius Bebee pointed out, the photograph shows the little tot in the white hat "patently doesn't want to go.  The porter already hates his passengers, and the woman on the steps is getting ready to file complaints before the train moves out of the depot."  Later, after Madison Avenue gets involved, "Mad delight will suffuse the faces of all concerned and Junior, from Central Casting, will be all Buster Brown smiles."

                                                                     (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-280419122743.jpeg)

   Trains, like the Florida Special, arrived at their destination in several identical sections during "the season" and rivaled the finest passenger transportation, even surpassing the Twentieth Centrury Limited.  Here, one of ACL's dual service Pacifics, a P5B, number 1740, does the honors prior to the power switch to FEC north of Jacksonville.

                                                                        (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-280419123018.jpeg)

   Naturally, there was a kind of fraternity of Pullman car porters.  Along with the comradery, there came the lore.  There is just something about travel by train that calls for adventure.  Here is Porter A. B. Jackson.  A fine example of the kind of man passengers expected to provide Pullman's best service.

   There were still some 14-section heavy weight passenger cars on the rails in the early 1950's and the porters called them "battleships."  Those attentive souls who have read the tale involving the cost of the uppers as compared to the lowers on p. 2 have some understanding of what it was like to spend the night in a section.  The accommodations were comfortable enough once the passenger learned to dress in confined space and accepted a green curtain as a privacy wall.  The only place for carry-on luggage was under the seats of the lower berth.  Personal belongings could be stored in a net that was stretched across the window of the section. The porter fixed a sheet of fabric over the window in pre-air-conditioning days to keep out the dust, soot, and coal dust.  Ladies and Gents bathrooms were located at the opposite ends of the car and could be crowded in the mornings.  Toilets flushed directly onto the tracks and a sign prohibiting flushing while the train was in the station were prominently displayed.

                                                               (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-280419124140.jpeg)

    But it was the porter who was assigned to a "battleship" that had the time of it.  Thirteen of the fourteen sections were assigned to passengers which gave the car porter twenty-six berths to make up and tear down each evening while his passengers were having dinner. (The fourteenth section was reserved for the porter and one of the men assigned to the dining room staff.)  Pullman's standards on how the berths were to be made were exacting and inspections were frequent.
   The most famous porter on the Atlantic Coast Line was a man named Daddy Joe.  Daddy Joe was one of the only porters from the Orlando area and, in fact, he grew up in Tahope County.  He was nearly seven feet tall and as black as night.  His arms were so long he could stand in the center aisle and open uppers on either side at the same time.  Then he could make up the berths simultaneously.  He was so fast when he walked down the aisle of a battleship that the sound of the uppers being lowered sounded like a kid raking a picket fence with a stick of pine wood.  He would repeat the feat on his way back and accomplish the whole task in less than five minutes. 
    Daddy Joe was always the master of his situation.  Once, in the 1930's a band of robbers tried to board Daddy Joe's train during a water stop.  Daddy Joe got onto the roof of his sleeper and held them off with his oratory until he could placate them with Pullman blankets and a quart of bourbon.  For that he received an extra week's pay and a plaque commemorating his heroic resistance to armed intruders. 
    No one interviewed here had actually met Daddy Joe, but many claimed to have known of him.  He is said to have died in 1943 in an ACL train wreck in North Carolina, in ACL service for over 40 years.
                                                            (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-280419124355.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 27, 2019, 06:48:27 PM
Another great story Bill. I wish I could of made it today.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on April 27, 2019, 07:27:41 PM
Thanks Bill another great Saturday Report from the A&S ...   And a toast this evening to Daddy Joe ...
All the best,
--Paul
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on April 28, 2019, 06:23:26 AM
Thanks for weaving the tale of the Pullman Porters Bill.  Always a treat reading your reports. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 28, 2019, 09:35:55 AM
A good day was had by all.....Bill, I wasn't speeding, the dispatcher said that the reefers had a lot of valuable product that had to get to market without delay.....I did not dawdle.  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 28, 2019, 12:57:13 PM
Followers of the Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report -
I am pleased to announce the photos for this week's report have been posted.  Once again it was my fault.  Whatever happened to "copy and paste?"  Sorrry for the inconvenience.

BTW, "Daddy Joe" was as much of a mythological character in the world of Pullman Porters as Paul Bunyon was to the loggers of the Northwest. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 04, 2019, 05:50:11 PM
SATURDAY REPORT DELAYED DUE TO LIGHTNING STORM.  TRY SUNDAY AFTER NOON.  SORRY ABOUT THAT! 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Oldguy on May 04, 2019, 09:24:54 PM
Another round of great stories.
In downtown Kansas City, MO, the waiters at the Savoy Grill were ex-pullman porters.  There service was always perfect.
The old Kansas Model Railroad Club was in the Union Station on the 6th or 7th floor (been awhile ago) and used to be a pullman porter dormitory.  The bathroom walls and showers were all marble.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 05, 2019, 12:43:04 PM
Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report May 4, 2019.

Yesterday, your Reporter was preparing this report when one of those Florida summer thunder storms suddenly came upon this location. (Central Florida is the lightning capital of the nation.) A lightning strike was so close it sounded like a howitzer going off.  Loss of internet and the burglar alarm system was the only noticeable damage.  Unfortunately, by the time internet was restored it was time to attend to my wife and her sister, who is visiting for an entire week.  This morning I was able to get my router back in service and am now submitting the Saturday Report.
 
   The Saturday morning meeting of the Board of Directors of the A&S Railroad began on time, but was interrupted by visitors related to the CEO.  After they cleared out, your Reporter marveled at the hand-made 30º crossover manufactured this week.  It is to be installed, hopefully this week, and that will go a long way towards completing the track plan for the Summit. 
   The ACL Champion received major maintenance this past week.  The trucks on each of the cars were disassembled and cleaned and a few inferior couplers were replaced.  Performance was noticeably improved.  However, even with the broad curves provided by the A&S civil engineers, backing 85' passenger cars is still a problem.  The solution may be to switch our couplers for a slightly longer shank.  That will be tried this week.
   An electrical problem occurred when the locomotives exited the reversing loop at the Summit.  This problem was 99% solved by connecting feeder wires and will be completely solved when additional feeders are dropped.
   Lunch was at Smokey Bones and we got to split a free desert because it is the week of your Reporter's birthday.  Many, many calories!  Good thing we wear overalls.
   After lunch, we tried running steam engines.  Overland Models made a brass ACL 4-8-4 back in the 70's and we are unlucky enough to own two of them.  They originally cost $190.00.  They weren't worth that then and they aren't worth that now.  They will probably be assigned to the display case, at least for now.

                                                                                                          THIS WEEK'S STORY

   The story this week is a little different.  It is a history lesson involving the A&S and the war of 1861-1865. 

   I had an old military school buddy from Vicksburg, Mississippi who died recently from complications with diabetes.  Lamar McMillan was a family doctor in Vicksburg, and a Civil War Historian.  He knew more about the 1861-1865 War than anyone I've ever known.  He also had a great sense of humor and knew how to put a spin on historical facts. Lamar would call them "alternative facts," but he didn't invent that term.  Anyway, here is Lamar's version of that war as retold by Tahope Citizens, whose ancestors worked for the A&S in the 1860's. 

                                                                                                               DIXIE DAYS

   The Atlantic & Southern was incorporated by the Florida Legislature in 1859.  Originally, the line ran from the St. Johns River in Mosquito County down to Tahope.  The main source of revenue came from cargo transported by the river boats that traveled up and down the river to and from Jacksonville.  Life was tranquil, considering Florida was still mostly frontier. All of that changed on January 10, 1861, when Florida became the third state to secede from the Union to join the Confederate States of America.  Florida, and the other Confederate States wanted the separation to be amicable, but it was not to be. 
   On April 12, 1861, in response to President Lincoln's claim that the Confederate States were in a state of rebellion, which was untrue, and his call for federal forces to put down the supposed rebellion, the Confederate State of South Carolina, launched a successful "first shot strategy" by clearing federal troops from Fort Sumter, which was located in Charleston Harbor. 
   Lincoln's response was to launch an invasion, designed to attack and destroy a peaceful, neighboring nation that only went to war to defend its independence in the "War of Northern Aggression."  The Confederate States lost their independence and the lives of many southern patriots when they resisted the unprovoked invasion and attack on their property. 
   Lincoln and his cronies called it and "The War Between the States" or "The Civil War," which is all untrue.  The "states" had separated into two separate countries before hostilities began so there were no states to have a war between.  Nor was the war "Civil." Lives and property were ruthlessly and unnecessarily lost.  This war was instigated from day one by the desire of President Lincoln to gain power and control over Dixie and her money. The North wanted to control the tax revenue derived from Southern cotton, which in those days amounted to over two thirds of the federal budget.
   Many sons of farmers and ranchers in Tahope County fought valiantly in Florida's 5th Confederate Volunteer Infantry Regiment, commanded by Brig. Gen. Benjamin Beauregard Benton, until the night they drove Old Dixie down."  Fortunately, the 5th Infantry had no casualties because the soldiers had no bullets due to Quartermaster oversight.  No portraits of General Benton exist, but his statue of was erected in front of the Tahope County Courthouse to memorialize the 5th Infantry Regiment's exploits, and no one seeks to remove it.

                                                      (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-050519123406.jpeg)
                      This is the only known photograph of General Benton.  Unfortunately, he was standing directly behind General Lee and his likeness is not shown.

   Today, the people of Tahope County remain peaceful and dutifully swear allegiance to the United States.  But there are a few who drive pick-up trucks flying the Confederate Battle Flag, chew tobacco, and long for independence from government intrusion in their lives.  These people are tolerated, even though they don't understand that the reason they are tolerated lies in the same freedom we all enjoy.  Yee-Ha! 

P.S.  The following U. S, Army military installations are named after Confederate generals:

Camp Beauregard, La. - Louisiana National Guard
Ft. Benning, Ga. - Home of the Infantry School, Armor School, and Airborne School
Ft. Bragg, N.C. - !8th Airborne Corps and Ft. Bragg
Ft. Gordon, Ga.- Home of the Signal Corps
Ft. A. P. Hill, Va.  - Army Training Center
Ft. Hood, Tx  - Armor
Ft. Lee, Va. - Quartermaster
Ft. Pickett, Va. - Virginia National Guard
Ft. Polk, La. - Army Readiness Training Center
Ft. Rucker, Ala. - Army Aviation

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on May 05, 2019, 02:12:36 PM
Great report judge, as usual.
I attended college in Kentucky. In the history department, there was of courses a class entitled "History of the South". My sophomore year, there was a question on the final exam, "Discuss the largest contribution to the economic recovery of the south during or after the "Civil War". My fraternity brother, Herschel Cave received an A for the semester by answering, that "the greatest contribution to the economic recovery of the South after the war came when General Sherman ran out of matches during his march  to the sea".
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 05, 2019, 02:50:27 PM
In Dixie Land where I was born in, early on a frosty mornin',Look away, look away, look away, Dixie Land.....
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on May 05, 2019, 05:03:53 PM
Very nice Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Blazeman on May 06, 2019, 11:14:21 AM
Notice in the portrait, all are the same height. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on May 06, 2019, 01:18:27 PM
In Dixie Land where I was born in, early on a frosty mornin',Look away, look away, look away, Dixie Land.....

Every body "look away" when Greg is at the Throttle. ;D ;D ;D ;D

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 11, 2019, 05:16:40 PM
Saturday Report - May 11, 2019.
The Directors of the A&S Railroad met at 0830 hours and tested the new hand crafted 30 degree crossover that was installed since the last report. "Smooth as glass," said your reporter as the ACL Champion clattered over the diamond.  Unfortunately, backing the Champ was not as easy as proceeding forward.  Derailments plagued the section foreman, who suggested a change of couplers.  The change was made in short order and there was no more difficulty.  We wondered out loud why we hadn't changed the couplers 10 years ago.  Better late than never I suppose.

Greg DeMayo arrived on the property with a New York Central Hudson.  We hitched it up to a freight and gave it a run.  DeMayo was on his best behavior and allowed his freight to follow at a respectful distance behind the Champion around the Summit.

Lunch at Smokey Bones, as usual.

Expect some track to be laid in the Summit yard this week.

This week's story involves a young man, down on his luck, who doesn't know to appreciate a good thing when he has it.

                                                                                                      Working on the Champ

   The Atlantic & Southern does not run any passenger trains.  It's sole piece of passenger equipment is an ancient Pullman solarium car, which is spotted on a stub track south of Tahope and reserved for the use of politicians, who sometimes gather there for a game of chance and some backroom deals involving the lives and property of local citizens.  Occasionally, the car is attached to a passenger train, so it can be used to transport the same politicians to Jacksonville to watch the annual Florida-Georgia football game in the Gator Bowl. 
   The citizens of Tahope catch the local mixed train to Sanlando if they wish to embark on a journey on one of the many passenger trains that frequent the area at different times of the year, including ACL's Champion, which has luxury accomodations, including fine dining, and is staffed by only the most skilled and seasoned conductors, porters, and dining room personnel.
It is 1950 and "The Champ" is powered by EMD E units, usually in an A-B-A configuration.  The train has a dining car owned by Pullman named Orlando, which seats 36 comfortably.  The car is nearly new, having been purchased after the war.  The staff includes the head steward, Mr. Butler, the head chef, an assistant chef, four waiters and a dishwasher. 
   One day in May, The Champ pulled into Sanlando loaded with passengers headed for Miami and St. Petersburg (The Champ splits in half south of Orlando at Auburndale, with half the train heading to Miami and the other half heading to St. Petersburg). Turns out, Mr. Butler had to put the dishwasher off the train due to illness.  A replacement was needed because it was time for lunch to be served. 
   Mr. Butler checked with the station agent to see if he could recommend a local replacement to wash dishes, but the station agent did not know of anyone who would fit the exacting standards required to work on The Champ.  That is when Mr. Butler noticed a short, unkept soul reclining on a bench near the station entrance, who appeared to be sleeping.
   Mr. Butler tapped him on the foot.  The young man appeared to be quite startled but was together enough to inquire for the reason his sleep was disturbed by a stranger.  "I am Mr. Butler, the head steward of The Champion" the stranger said, "and I need a temporary dishwasher to help with my train.  I can pay $ 20.00 a day plus meals and the use of a berth in a section."  "You got your man," said the benchwarmer. "My name is Donny, but my friends call me Short Stack."   
   With that, Mr. Butler herded Short Stack into the diner and instructed one of the waiters to get him cleaned up and dressed for business.  Now, Short Stack's looks and his general demeanor did not improve with the starched white uniform the waiter provided him, but his self esteem was positively affected. This was the most prestigious job he ever had.
   The Assistant Chef showed Short Stack the side sink and instructed him on his dishwashing duties.  Fortunately, the china selected by Pullman for use on The Champion was heavy duty so no matter how many times Short Stack let a dish or cup slip through his soapy fingers, minimal breakage occurred.
   Short Stack soon learned that he had an hour or two between meals that he could call his own.  He used them to explore the train, especially the cabinet beneath the bar in the club car where the liquor was stored.  The trip to Miami was mostly uneventful and Short Stack enjoyed the soft clean, upper berth he slept in through the night in Miami while awaiting the morning departure back to Sanlando.
   On the way back to Sanlando the next day, Short Stack learned that the compartments in the sleepers did not have locks on the doors.  The car porter was supposed to keep watch but he would sometimes take a smoke break standing in the vestibule between cars. 
   Short Stack saw his chance and entered Compartment C.  He removed a valuable pearl necklace from its hiding place and was about to put it in his pocket when a large hand belonging to the porter grabbed him by the nape of the neck. 
   About that time the train pulled into the station at Sanlando and the porter escorted Short Stack to the doorway.  He disembarked into the custody of Officer Poovey of the Tahope Police Department who charged him with grand theft.
   Short Stack's ma and pa hired Lawyer Marvin Bello to represent him and it was decided that, since he was caught red handed, a guilty plea would be the best strategy.  So, Short Stack entered a plea before Circuit Judge Elvin Thomas.  The prosecutor recommended two to three years in prison as a sentence because Short Stack "is a bum who lives in the Bottoms where he trespasses on railroad property and is constantly misdemeanin." 
   Judge Thomas asked Short Stack if he was entering his plea voluntarily and Short Stack said, "Judge, I didn't steal a damn thing.  I was caught while I was just lookin' at the necklace."  The Judge informed Short Stack that in Florida trying to steal something is the same as stealing it.  Short Stack said, "That don't seem right to me."  The Judge said, "It don't seem right to me neither.  Thirty days."   

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-110519170905.jpeg)
Short Stack's Parents,Virgil and Daisey


(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-110519171202.jpeg)
Florida Chain Gang.  That's Short Stack in the striped outfit




Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on May 12, 2019, 06:18:23 AM
Another great Report Bill.  Always entertaining!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 12, 2019, 10:25:19 AM
Atta Boy Bill.....great yarn.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on May 12, 2019, 12:20:27 PM
Atta Boy Bill.....great yarn.  8)

What Greg said...…….Excellent Story Bill.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on May 12, 2019, 12:21:25 PM
Keep up the good work Bill.  You've got a following here.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 18, 2019, 09:38:21 AM
May 18, 2019 Saturday Report

There is no Saturday Report today.  Your reporter is otherwise engaged in work activity.  Sorry about that. 

This week's story involves the inner workings of A&S management in the purchase of the acreage to be used for the new yard facility at Summit.

                                                                                                  The Freight Yard at Summit

    Finally, construction has gotten started on the extensive freight yard located on the east side of Summit.  The yard doesn't have a name yet, but names will be considered at the next meeting of the Board of Directors.
    The A&S recently acquired the acreage for the new freight yard from the local Seminole Indian Tribe for expansion of its yard and diesel engine service facilities at Summit.  The purchase required extensive negotiations.  The A&S realtor, Ivana Rippemoff, offered Seminole Indian Chief, Micanopy, $1.00 an acre and that offer was rejected. The Chief wanted $1.50. The A&S realtor explained that the land was essentially worthless because it was located in a swamp.  The realtor stated, "Chief, the land is no good to you.  It is a swamp filled with gators and snakes.  You can't grow anything on it and it is too wet to live on.  So why do you think the A&S should pay more than $1.00 an acre for it?"  The Chief thought a minute and said, "It pretty good for railroad." The A&S paid the $1.50.   

                                                                                                (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-180519092936.jpeg)
   
                                                                                           Seminole Indian Chief Micanopy

    The reader should note that Chief Micanopy is a REAL Seminole Indian and does not wear war paint, a war bonnet, or a breast plate.  Nor does he ride a war horse or throw a feathered spear at nothing in particular.  A marked difference from some so-called "Seminoles" in Tallahassee. 


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 18, 2019, 09:46:10 AM
It seems that the A&S doesn't negotiate with the Indians as well as the Dutch.....great story Bill.  :) :) :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on May 18, 2019, 10:46:14 AM
Another fun story Bill
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 18, 2019, 02:49:56 PM
Jim and Greg - Thank you for your continued interest in my little stories and your kind remarks. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on May 18, 2019, 03:53:36 PM
I think there may be a little Truth in this story.  :o :o :o :o

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on May 18, 2019, 04:26:36 PM
Great story Judge. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on May 18, 2019, 04:47:42 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on May 19, 2019, 08:16:25 AM

Saturday Report as told by the A&S RR CEO.

Yesterday started off with a little work in the East Yard at Summit. Soon after Curt (PRR) came by followed by Reading Bob and then followed by Greg (GPdemayo).

The CEO shared plans for the upper level, demonstrated a new way of throwing turnouts and discussed some ideas for background flats.

Reading Bob brought his Central Railroad of New Jersey switcher. It needed a little program adjustment and after that pulled a local freight of 9 cars plus a caboose in both directions at Summit. The loco performed very well.

The SBG moved the meeting to Smokey Bones for some BBQ and BSing.

After lunch, Greg made a speed run up the Ovalix using his NYC Hudson 4-6-4. He ran it at notch 99 on the Digitrax controller. I think Greg made the 260 foot trip in just over 2 minutes and a couple seconds. He said he decided to try it since the Ticket Agent wasn't on site.

More general BSing followed and Curt inquired if he had yet qualified for membership in the SBG. A vote of those present unanimously agreed to accept Curt as a SBG member. He was advised that he now has to have a SGB meet at his house to view the PRR.

The report is as accurate as this CEO can remember. After all, yesterday was a long time ago.  8)


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 19, 2019, 09:14:32 AM
A good day was had by all.....the official new official record for the "The Great Ovalix Climb To Summit" was set and stands at 2 minutes & 36 seconds.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on May 19, 2019, 09:24:27 AM
I make a motion that the minutes of the Saturday meeting the A&S/SBG be approved as read.   ;)

Special thanks goes out to the engine servicing facility for getting my little ugly duckling CRRNY switcher operating normally again.   ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 19, 2019, 10:13:24 AM

The report is as accurate as this CEO can remember. After all, yesterday was a long time ago.  8)


Not bad, for a CEO who spent much of his younger years on a golf course getting his brain fried in the Central Florida sun.  ;D

Don't forget the words of my dear ole' Granddad....."If in doubt, make notes."  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: madharry on May 19, 2019, 11:48:18 AM
Congratulations to Curt on your membership. I would like to be a member but unfortunately I live too far way.
Mike :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 22, 2019, 10:20:36 AM
We accept long distance memberships to the SBG so long as the dues are paid in advance.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on May 22, 2019, 10:42:51 AM

Wouldn't want to eat any of that barbecue shipped across the pond.
Might get really ripe in transit.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 26, 2019, 03:18:34 PM
   
    This week's report and story is delayed due to administrator updates.  Photographs won't post so I will wait until tomorrow to post the Saturday Report and this week's story.  Sorry about that!  Not my fault.
   

   
                                                                                                   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 27, 2019, 09:43:51 PM
No Saturday Report this week.  I am having trouble posting photographs! Again!  Something about the new update......Sorry.  Maybe next Saturday.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on May 28, 2019, 06:44:47 AM
Dang!  I was looking forward to your report Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on May 28, 2019, 06:55:52 AM
No Saturday Report this week.  I am having trouble posting photographs! Again!  Something about the new update......Sorry.  Maybe next Saturday.


Bill,

I couldn't post photos either. I reported the issue to JD.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 01, 2019, 04:57:16 PM
I don't know why I can't seem to post anything.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 01, 2019, 05:02:55 PM
I have tried for over two hours to post a Saturday Report on this forum and I give up.  When I copy the report from WORD and paste it to this reply box it copies and pastes without a problem.  Then when I try to post it I get referred to the Administrator and asked to try again.  I give up!  At least for today.  Sorry.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Janbouli on June 02, 2019, 05:09:14 AM
I have tried for over two hours to post a Saturday Report on this forum and I give up.  When I copy the report from WORD and paste it to this reply box it copies and pastes without a problem.  Then when I try to post it I get referred to the Administrator and asked to try again.  I give up!  At least for today.  Sorry.
Try making your report in notepad , sometimes Word adds a lot of stuff that forum software doesn't like too much, it looks like simple text , but it's not.  Just copy paste it to notepad and then copy paste to a forum post.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 02, 2019, 07:08:54 AM
Bill,

I go back to my original suggestion for you in posting. Typing it in word is fine. Once done, print your story and then type it into the "Reply" section.

I never use word with anything on this forum. I type directly to the "Post reply", proofread it and make any changes necessary. I'll then hit "Preview" and proofread once more.

Try just typing directly into the "Post reply". Then you can copy and past photos from the gallery.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 02, 2019, 08:25:19 AM
Tom - I'm going to do it your way and see if I have any better luck.  I need to advise forum members that until the latest update I had no problem copying and pasting from a WORD document.  Since that is the format I use to prepare my reports and stories, I will now have to "retype" my materials. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 02, 2019, 10:00:23 AM
Saturday Report - June 1, 2019.
    The Board of Directors Meeting of the Atlantic & Southern RR started right on time Saturday morning.  The question on the agenda for discussion was whether to purchase a new road switcher from the Central of Georgia RR.  (The Southern RR owns most of the CofG stock).  The decision was unanimous and a new SD9 from BLI should arrive for inspection this week.  A source has been located for Central of Georgia caboose decals so a new freight train should be in business soon.

    There has been much progress towards completing the yard at Summit.  The turn-outs are set to operate manually with a really innovative (at least to your reporter) device which is a wire running from each turn-out to the facia board.  The wire is a "push and pull" arrangement and will be finished with a knob.  The system is quite simple and it really works!  The advantages of the system are (1) the cost savings for the purchase of over 15 switch motors; (2) zero electrical problems or maintenance; and (3) no need to throw switches from the handsets.  Switch motors will operate the turn-outs off the mainline that runs through the yard so the signaling system will work.

    Operations were somewhat limited Saturday.  A run by the Champion from Summit to the Midlands and back was made with two FP7A units providing the power.  The FP7's handled the trip up and down the Ovalix without difficulty.  However, we are still having problems with couplers on the passenger cars and some of them will have to be sent to the shop for adjustment.

    A freight train powered by SAL Citrus Scheme E6's made the trip up and down the Ovalix to the Midlands and back without incident.  No problems with freight cars.

    Friend and member of the SBG Greg DeMayo arrived about 10:00 a.m.  Grreg was on his best behavior, which was appreciated by all.  Greg likes to do little mischievous things like moving a structure from one place to another just to see if we notice the change.  A bit of ballast mysteriously got moved from a track in the engine service area and placed in a pile nearby.  Greg denied that he was responsible for relocating the ballast and we believed him.  Officer Poovey of the Tahope Police Department will investigate further.

    The switchmen were not on the ball Saturday, causing several derailments, but no wrecks.  Brownies were issued. You just can't get good help these days.

    The crew broke for lunch promptly at 11:00 a.m. and traveled to Smokey Bones.  After lunch there was another short operating session.  A heavy weight passenger train powered by ACL P5A 1516 provided service to the folks in the Midlands and the gang departed A&S property shortly thereafter.

                                                                                                     TRADEMARK INFRINGEMENT

    Your reporter would be less than observant if he did not report to his dismay and surprise this month's MR covered a layout from "up Nawth" in Pennsylvania that is called the Atlantic & Southern.  It seems that the modeler was originally going to model the ACL and the Southern RR, but he strayed from that laudable direction and now has a railroad that has steel manufacturing facilities and other smelly stuff that would overpower the scent of orange blossoms and tropical flowers in Florida.  Yet he still calls this pike the Atlantic & Southern.  The Board of Directors considered sending him a cease and desist notice because the Atlantic & Southern located in Tahope County, Florida has common law trademark claims to the name.  After all, the present owners of the A&S inherited the name and all rights to it from the late and great Al Bixbie sometime in the 70's.  However, after consultation with the A&S general counsel, Marvin Bello, the Directors decided to leave well enough alone considering there is no competition between the two railroads. 

    This week's story involves our vagabond friends Newt and Short Stack, who you remember, are cousins and used to live with their parents in the two cracker shacks located at Eaton's Curve.  Since their eviction from those premises, they have taken up residence in The Bottoms, where they live the carefree life of hobos and occasionally get into difficulties.  The piece today relates their activities on that rainy summer evening when they decided to steal a steam locomotive.

                                                                                                  THE LOCOMOTIVE THEFT ADVENTURE

    It gets real dark after the sun goes down during the summer in Central Florida and it is especially dark in the freight yard at Sanlando.  Add 90-degree heat, 98% humidity, and a constant drizzle of rain and not even the freight yard night watchman would venture out of his office shack to check out the going's on in the yard.

  These conditions provided Newt and Short Stack with the perfect opportunity to be up to mischief.  They crept into the freight yard to check out the rolling stock and see if there was anything of value that was loose.  They had a modicum of luck when they found a ventilated box car with the car door unlocked.  Inside were boxes of fresh fruits. 

    After eating their fill, they wandered down the track towards the Pure Oil storeage facility.  It was there they discovered a steam switch engine panting inside the fenced enclosure with two tank cars coupled to it.  It was ACL's 1150, a USRA 0-6-0, and the gate was open. 

    (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-020619095351.jpeg)

     They uncoupled the tank cars from the engine and climbed into the cab.  Short Stack, who had some limited experience as a hostler, shoveled coal into the firebox to bring the steam pressure up.  In a few minutes there was enough pressure to move the engine, so they decided to go for a ride.  Short Stack put the reverse lever into the back corner and cracked the throttle for a little steam.  The engine responded and slowly backed out into the yard. 

       (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-020619095533.jpeg)

    They became more adventurous and added a little more steam as they headed for the mainline.  Soon the amateur railroaders were heading towards Eaton's Curve.  It was there thy decided to blow the whistle to attract the attention of their parents who were sitting on the front porch of Daisey's shack drinking beer.  The sound of the whistle attracted the attention of the Tahope Police Department and Officer Poovey gave chase to the switcher.  Our heroes abandoned the engine in the vacinity of Barlow's Bar-B-Que and were arrested and charged with Grand Theft of the locomotive.

    Marvin Bello was once again called upon to defend our two vagabonds and when he appeared before Judge Elvin P. Thomas on the day of trial, he moved to dismiss the charges.  The judge agreed.  "No larceny," said his honor, "the locomotive never left A&S property."  No charges were brought for the stolen fruit because the defendants "et the evidence."
   
    A reporter from the Tahope Daily Blatter interviewed Newt as he left the courtroom.  When asked about his participation in the loco caper, Newt rermarked, "I was tempted to succeed at doing something this week, but I got arrested before anything happened."  And, as they say, "So it goes."

   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 02, 2019, 10:41:30 AM
Love it, the antics of these two vagabonds is gonna git'em kilt one day.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on June 02, 2019, 10:51:53 AM
...
    Marvin Bello was once again called upon to defend our two vagabonds and when he appeared before Judge Elvin P. Thomas on the day of trial, he moved to dismiss the charges.  The judge agreed.  "No larceny," said his honor, "the locomotive never left A&S property."  No charges were brought for the stolen fruit because the defendants "et the evidence."
...

I was thinking, "Maybe prosecutor could go for 'Theft of Service'," but I'm sure Counsel for the Defendants would point out that no one was served by that move.

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 02, 2019, 12:03:02 PM
Good one Bill.....God knows I try to behave, but it's really hard sometimes.  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 02, 2019, 12:35:47 PM
Dave - The problem is that traditionally, theft required both manucaption (taking in hand) and asportation (carrying away).  That is why a shoplifter doesn't become a thief until she passes the point of sale.  It is also why our vagabonds did not commit theft.  Unfortunately, in states like Florida, the legislature has done away with both requirements.  Now it is enough for the culprit to try to deprive the owner (or custodian) of a right to the property.  I suppose it would be theft to try to temporarily deprive someone of the use of a document or even an intangible like a stock option.  But today's story takes place in 1950 and at that time the legislature still preferred to limit theft convictions to actual thieves.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on June 03, 2019, 12:54:39 PM
Great update your Honor.  The only part I have trouble believing is that Greg behaved himself.  That seems a little far fetched.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 03, 2019, 01:31:04 PM
Great update your Honor.  The only part I have trouble believing is that Greg behaved himself.  That seems a little far fetched.  ;)


It can happen Bob.....not often, but it can happen.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on June 03, 2019, 03:46:34 PM
Great update your Honor.  The only part I have trouble believing is that Greg behaved himself.  That seems a little far fetched.  ;)


It can happen Bob.....not often, but it can happen.  ;D ;D ;D

I agree that it CAN happen, the question is DID it happen, or is that just hear say.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on June 04, 2019, 07:34:48 AM
Another great Report Bill!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 07, 2019, 11:31:33 AM
ATTENTION followers of the Saturday Report.  I reviewed previous editions of the Report this morning and noted there has been some interference with my prose.  I suspect it has to do with the recent update to the Forum platform.  I will be correcting the problems beginning this weekend, starting with page 1 and moving forward.  Sorry about the inconvenience. 

The Judge
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 08, 2019, 04:32:45 PM
The Saturday  Report will be delayed until Sunday noon ONCE AGAIN!  Sorry.  I seem to have a different problem every week. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on June 08, 2019, 07:13:18 PM
Others have had similar problems cutting-and-pasting from Word. It's probably due to the hidden mark-up characters in Word.  Before copying, try this:  Select your text, go to Format -> Styles.  Change the bottom menu to show "List All Styles"  Now select "Normal (Web)", copy and paste.  See if that fixes the problem.

(Word is an abomination...)

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Janbouli on June 08, 2019, 07:25:08 PM
Or just copy paste to a "plain text"app like Notepad which is on every Windows PC and probably an equivalent on an Apple . Or just write the text in Notepad.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 09, 2019, 06:29:43 AM
Thank you for your kind suggestions.  For now, I am going to simply type my reports here instead of trying to copy and paste.  Thanks again.  I agree WORD is an abomination.  I used Word Perfect during my time on the bench and found it to be a much superior product.  But Microsoft has managed to convince the world that WORD is the platform to use and now we are stuck with it.  Saturday Report follows.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 09, 2019, 07:33:18 AM
    Saturday Report for Saturday, June 8, 2019.

    The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours and immediately went into executive session to discuss the progress report, which was considerable.  The freight yard at Summit continues to be under construction and permanent wiring is expected in the next two weeks.  Appropriate knobs have been purchased from Hobby Lobby to attach to the hand throws for the yard.
    An SD9 loco was received from BLI, painted in Central of Georgia colors.  (Georgia, by the way, is correctly pronounced "Jaw-Ja.")  Beautiful model.  Unfortunately, the decoder was unsatisfactory.  However, a new decoder from TCS WOW Sound is going to be installed anyway so the faulty BLI decoder was a welcome addition to the trash can.
    More importantly, there were major gremlins at work this morning.  The Digitrax system is somewhat complex and for some reason the program track is inoperative.  That was only one of the problems.  Most of them were solved by telephone call to an expert who will arrive on the property Sunday for a complete inspection.  Ah, computers.  You gotta love 'em.
    Before lunch, we did manage to get one train move.  An SAL GP7 picked up a string of freight cars from the Sanlando yard and hauled it up the Ovalix to Summit.  The train orders required the engineer to pick up some cars from the Summit freight yard.  That was accomplished before lunch, which was at Smokey Bones. 
    After lunch, Greg Demayo and wife arrived on the property.  They were mainly on station to meet the new family puppy.  The CEO may post a photo of the vicious creature if he is encouraged to do so by his admiring public. 
    The Saturday Session adjourned around 1:30 p.m., to reconvene on Sunday afternoon.
    No Saturday Report next weekend.  Out of town trip planned from Thursday til Sunday.

    This week's story is one of those railroad legends that have many versions.  The version published here is the most credible.

                                                                                                     ORIGIN OF THE SAND DOME

    Some say the use of sand to give locomotives extra traction was a Pennsy invention.  Others say it came from the B&O.  Tain't so!  The first sanders originated on the Atlantic & Southern in the early 1860's, during the Confederacy. 
    The mosquitos in Florida during the summer are gigantic.  It has been recorded that they are so large and vicious that they can penetrate the bottom of a cast iron cornbread skillet held up for protection.  There was a time, during Reconstruction, when a bill was introduced in the Tallahassee legislature to make them the State Bird.
    In July, of '62, when it was the hottest, the 'skeeters were grasshopper size.  The pesky critters were naturally attracted to the road bed of the A&S and thousands of them swarmed the tracks, causing a slippery mess that seriously interfered with railroad operations.  For a week or two the A&S employed men to walk ahead of the engines with a broom and sweep the tracks, but this solution had little real effect because the 'skeeters would jump back on the track when the train passed.  And it was hard to keep men for more than a day or two due to the number of stinging bites the 'skeeters inflicted upon them.  Besides, the brooms soon wore out and he trains were reduced to crawling speed of merely 2 mph.  Finally, an employee in the Maintenance Department, whose name has been lost to the ages, came up with the idea of attaching sand boxes to the cow catchers on the locomotives in such a way that steams of sand would automatically be deposited on the rails in front of the wheels.  The sand allowed he wheels of the engine to squish the mosquitos without losing traction so the scheme proved to be an unqualified success.  It was soon adopted by other roads.
    Now-a-days, bat houses are strategically placed on railroad right-a-ways in Florida to control the mosquitos. A bat can eat his weight in 'skeeters in a day.  As a result, much less sand is needed by the railroad.  That is a significant cost savings considering sand is a scarce commodity in Florida.  Today, sand is primarily used by the A&S to add traction to the engines when they climb the 1% grade on the Ovalix. 
    And that's the truth, as related by Will Fixer, Director of Maintenance, A&S Railroad.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 09, 2019, 09:00:41 AM
Maddie was three months old when this photo was taken. She is now five months old. She loves visiting the A&S RR and finds everything this CEO drops on the floor.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/24-090619085811.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on June 09, 2019, 10:24:40 AM
Another great story Bill. Enjoy your trip.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 09, 2019, 10:47:59 AM
Good one Bill.....if you think the "skeeters" are bad up here, you ought to visit the Everglades in July or August.....they are so big they make a B-29 look like a toy plane.  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on June 09, 2019, 11:04:58 AM
Another great update!   ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on June 09, 2019, 12:28:19 PM
Here's a modern bug sweeper :-) 
(http://www.holdenplantrentals.com/uploads/articles/LUAS_RAIL_SWEEPER_JANUARY_2010_007.JPG)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 09, 2019, 01:40:55 PM
Thanks for the photo of the modern bug sweeper.  Just proves there's a prototype for everything! 

And Maddie looks sweet.  Another five months and she'll be too big to fit in your hand.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 15, 2019, 05:11:05 PM
Surprise! Surprise!  There is a Saturday Report after all!  My wife, Cindy, and I cancelled our long weekend due to the illness of one of the other couples who were going to travel with us. 

The Atlantic & Southern Board of Directors convened promptly at 0830 hours and opened the meeting with a Coke and a Diet Pepsi.  Then we got down to business.  Your reporter was given a tour of the progress made at the Summit Yard.  All switch machines are installed and wired for the mainline.  Due to one of the ACL E7A units receiving a new decoder in the repair shop, the E6's were called into service to power the Champion.  As has been recently reported, we have been tweeking our passenger equipment to avoid unwanted uncouplings and derailments.  That project continued today.  It is almost necessary to individually tweek each Walthers passenger car in order to get optimum performance.  Today we discovered some of our ACL cars had the wrong couplers on them and almost all of the end diaphrams drooped low enough to foul the Kay Dee couplers.  Adjustments were made and tweeking will probably continue in the future.

The Champion made its run from Summit to the Midlands and back without difficulty.  Those slant nosed E6's really look great pulling a passenger consist. 

Lunch was (guess where) at Smokey Bones.

After lunch we decided to run one of our strange locomotives - a Seaboard Centipede.  It is not much to look at unless you really,, really like to watch wheels.  The loco still has the original unacceptable sound system in it and we decided to convert it to WOW Sound during the next round of updates.

The track gang plans on completing the wiring on the Yard at Summit this week, hopefully making it fully operational next Saturday.

This week's story is the product of some of my nostalgic recollections of dinning on the train in the 1950's and comparing that experience to my recent trip on AMTRAK from Orlando to Savannah.  Let me be plain - There is no comparison.  No wonder AMTRAK is only one step above greyhound travel.

                                                                                               DINING ON THE ATLANTIC & SOUTHERN

    The Atlantic & Southern Railroad does not own any dining cars.  It relies upon the diners from other railroads to provide food services to its passengers.  That does not mean the A&S management is unprepared to purchase a dinner with Atlantic & Southern emblazed upon its road boards when passenger traffic justifies it. 
    There were still a few heavy weight diners on the rails 1950 and they tended to be part of the consist powered by the few steam engines still working passenger trains at that late date.  Seaboard had several of these diners.  The Coast Line diners had recently been replaced by lightweight Bud built diners, but whichever type diner was found in the consist, mealtime could be a pleasant, and quite nostalgic experience.
    Some of the post war Coast Line diners had interesting table configurations with seating for four on one side of the diner and seating for two on the other side.  The tables for two provided a more private setting and avoided the annoying Pullman practice of seating strangers at your table simply because seats were available.
    The variety of dishes offered during an overnight trip included local specialties such as crab cakes, chicken and dumplings, fresh catfish, and citrus delicacies.  But breakfast in the diner was the meal anticipated by everyone. 
    The Coast Line served the standard breakfast fare served on many railroads that included two poached eggs on toast with ham hash and fried tomatoes. 
    A numbered "instruction book" gave detailed directions to the dining staff.  Each steward, chef, and waiterss-in-charge were required to carry a copy of the book with them at all times while on duty.  Lost instruction books could be replaced with a "replica' at the cost of $.00.
    Instructions for serving breakfast on "All Trains" included the following:

    "Complementary demitasse coffee at breakfast.  This service must be extended to every guest in the dining car at breakfast on all trains.  The guest is not to be asked if coffee is to be brought out by the waiter at the time a glass of ice water is placed on the table for the guest.  Failure of the Steward of waiter to follow these instructions will result in disciplinary action." 

    Some of the instructions were to the point.  For instance, the Superintendent of Dining Cars had this to say about serving bacon:

    "While it is realized that in heavy trains it will be hard to broil bacon to order, the system of duping one or two pounds of bacon in the frying pan,all owing it to fry with the result that 10%to 15% will break, curl up, and look messy when served has got to be stopped.  Hereafter, on heavy trains chefs will place ready sliced bacon on the baking pan, cook partially in the oven to break the grain on the meat and finish in the broiler.  Bacon thus cooked will look more appetizing, will not crumble or curl, will show better on the plate, and will repay you in a better percentage for your effort."

    Chefs were expected to know how to prepare basic menu item, such as an omlet, and were only provided with variation instructions.  Among many variations included an omlet "with fried tomato slices, bacon."  Chefs were instructed to "place omelette (that's how they spelled it) in center of hot service plate.  Garnish one side of omelette with three slices of fried tomato, each slice overlapping the other, cross two strips bacon on to of omelette.  Sprig of parsley."
    Many railroads were famous for their breakfast French toast. The Coast Line was no exception.  However, the instruction book fails to explain how Coast Line French Toast was out of the ordinary.  Having consulted wit the A&S Food Service Superintendent, the following recipe will be used on A&S diners if one is ever acquired:

                                                                                            ATLANTIC & SOUTHERN FRENCH TOAST
                                                                                                              (SERVES TWO)

French toast:

Loaf of French bread cut into four 1" to 1 1'2 " slices.
1 large egg, thoroughly beaten
1/4 cup sugar
Few drops vanilla extract
Tablespoon butter
1/2 cup chopped pecan halves (optional)
6 slices bacon, fried
1 banana sliced into 14 inch rounds -just before serving

Berry topping:

Package (12 oz.) frozen (or fresh) raspberries or blue berries
1/2 cup water (or less)
1/4 cup sugar
1 Tablespoon cornstarch, dissolved in just enough water to dissolve
Confectioner's sugar

Pour beaten egg into a bowl.  Add sugar and vanilla extract and mix well.  Soak bread slices in egg mixture and grill them until both sides are toasted.
Saute pecans in butter under low heat, stirring constantly.  Remove from pan when toasted.  Do Not Burn.
Place berries in a pot and add enough water to come up one half inch above the berries on the sides.  Heat berries on medium low heat and add sugar and gently stir.    When berries are hot, add dissolved corn starch and stir.  Remove from heat when mixure ghickens.
Place French Toast on serving plate and sprinkle with sifted Confectioner's sugar.  Add toasted pecans on top.  Serve berry topping in separate bowl.
 Serve with bacon and banana

The complete 1953 Atlantic Coast Line Recipe book can be found at:  http://railroadarchives.org/content/atlantic-coast-line-railroad-recipes-cookbook-1953.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 15, 2019, 05:24:11 PM
The Judge AKA: The Ticket Agent, and I had a very productive day on the A&S. As mentioned most of the ACL Champion cars were tweeked and diaphrams were adjusted as well. After those issues were fixed we enjoyed smooth running for the last half of the day.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on June 15, 2019, 06:14:34 PM
In place of the vanilla extract, my railroad dining service substitutes a little Grand Marnier when appropriate.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on June 15, 2019, 07:17:24 PM
Another interesting story Bill. It was nice seeing you on Friday at Jon's.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 17, 2019, 04:31:25 PM
Deemery -   Do you know why the RR needs a track sweeper??
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 17, 2019, 05:40:05 PM
Always loved having meals in the dining car.....they were the best.  8)


Especially liked the lounge car going to school in the fall and returning home in the spring.....never could tell who you were liable to meet.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 22, 2019, 04:18:13 PM
Once again I am having trouble attaching photos.  Saturday Report delayed until sometime Sunday.  Sorry
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on June 22, 2019, 04:23:19 PM
Deemery -   Do you know why the RR needs a track sweeper??


To remove the slippery bugs from the rails???


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on June 22, 2019, 09:11:56 PM
Always loved having meals in the dining car.....they were the best.  8) 
Especially liked the lounge car going to school in the fall and returning home in the spring.....never could tell who you were liable to meet.  :)



Agreed.
On the Louisville section of the eastbound C&O George Washington, the people to meet were the GI's being discharged from Fort Knox who usually had wads of cash with them.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on June 23, 2019, 11:31:29 AM
Hey Tom:

Great picture of Maggie. I always enjoy seeing other's Pets.

karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 23, 2019, 03:35:20 PM
I am having problems.  I may not be able to submit a Saturday Report this week.  I get knocked off line during my preparation of the report and then I lose my data.
 I really wish I could find a dependable cable company.  But there is not such thing.

Sorry.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on June 23, 2019, 03:54:17 PM
I am having problems.  I may not be able to submit a Saturday Report this week.  I get knocked off line during my preparation of the report and then I lose my data.
 I really wish I could find a dependable cable company.  But there is not such thing.

Sorry.


Judge


Try this:  write at the top of your post draft.  We will all know it's a work in progress.  Then hit the post button every paragraph or so. Then go in an modify your post to continue your wonderful stories.  If you do get kicked off you will only loose the last paragraph or what you have done since the last save.




I just typed this post using the method and it works.  I learned to do this when I was editing the index for my build threads - had the same problem. This is not a problem with the new server but with interment internet service.


The last step is to delete the draft off the top.  Do this  with a modify after you have saved it in the final form.


Full discloser your honor - I also have to go in and modify my posts to correct my spelling errors.  I don't always find all of them.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 23, 2019, 04:18:42 PM
John - Are you able to post photos?  I am following Tom Langford's instructions to the "T" and it has always (or at least most of the time) worked before.  Now I am unable to attach photos.

I will try your suggestion on saving text.  Sounds like a winner. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 23, 2019, 04:31:05 PM
I took John's suggestion and published this week's story piece meal to avoid losing data through loss of internet connection.  Now if I could only attach the photographs that go with the story.

Saturday Report
The Board of Directors convened the Saturday meeting at 0830 hours.  The freight yard at Summit was inspected.  It is completely wired and all switch motors and manual stops are activated.  The trackwork is excellent.  A&S must have skilled gandy dancers.

Jim Miller visited us and stayed until noon. 

   We ran the Champion around Summit and sent it down the ovalix to The Bottoms.  It was replaced by the eleven car C&O George Washington, which was powered by an A-B-A lash-up of Fe3's.  No problem for those diesels to pull that heavy train up the constant 1% grade for all 10 revolutions to Summit.

We adjourned for lunch at Smokey Bones.  The Babe joined us for tea.

After lunch we broke in the new yard at Summit, performing various switching moves and getting used to the numerous tracks and turnouts.

All-all a very happy Saturday. 

No report next Saturday.  The Babe has to make her trip to Mount Dora.

This week's story has as its main character our old friend Newt Fisher, who has decided to seek gainful employment.
 

                                                                                                        The Engine Watchman

Newt Fisher, you remember him, he''s the son of Luke and Talulla Fisher, who live in one of the cracker shacks on Eaton's Curve (See page eight), decided one day that the life of a hobo living in The Bottoms held no future for him so he decided to "nail a drag" and ride a Pullman boxcar to Jacksonville to seek employment with the Coast Line.  He managed to board an empty reefer, but the hind shack caught him at the yard throat and demanded $2.00 for safe passage to Jax. 

Now Newt ain't about to give in to a shake down by a brakie so he jumped clear of the reefer and walked towards the engine.  He watched the shack walk down the line of cars looking for other itenerant passengers, and when the shack's back was turned, he hopped on the cow catcher and sat perched under the locomotive's head light.  Long about 8:00 p.m. the conductor signaled a high ball and the Pacific eased out of the yard.  As the engine began to pick up speed, Newt started to doubt the wisdom of his decision to ride the cow catcher.  The engine nosed first to the right and then to the left as it gained speed, nearly dislodging him from his seat.  And the headlight attracted every form of flying insect known to Florida, and all of them flew into Newt's face.  Then it rained.  Sheets of water peppered Newt as the engine reached track speed of 55 mph.

Finally,, the train entered the freight yard at Jacksonville and Newt jumped off the cow catcher right into the arms of a police officer, who arrested him for trespass on Coast Line property and booked him into the Duval County Jail.  Newt, who would never turn down free room and board, patiently awaited his court appearance a few weeks later.  He entered a guilty plea, was sentenced to time served, and became a free man again.  The jail was not far from the Coast Line freight yard so Newt high tailed it over to the trainmaster's office for an interview with the yard clerk. 

The yard clerk gave him and employment application to fill out and Newt proudly related his extensive prior employment experience assisting his father to tend to crab traps and handling day jobs with the A&S.  With this impressive resume, he was offered a job as an engine watchman and his name was marked up on the extra board. 

An engine watchman is a member of a freight train crew who comes aboard when a steam engine has to be tied down for the night at a location other than a service facility, such as a roundhouse.  The engine watchman assumes some of the duties of a hostler.  He is responsible to maintain the banked fire overnight, work the injector to keep the water level up in the boiler, and load coal into the tender's coal bunker.  This last duty is usually accomplished by transferring coal from a hopper car spotted next to the tender on an adjacent track.

Newt got called for a local freight that originated at the freight yard at Jacksonville and terminated at the freight yard at Summit.  The train is usually powered by one of the Coast Line's many dual service Pacifics and the trip requires the engine to be tied down overnight at the yard at Sanlando.  The train arrived at Sanlando about 11:00 p.m.

Newt had no difficulty banking the fire and he didn't mind staying up all night to work the injector.  But he did have a problem loading coal in the tender bunker.  He climbed down from the cab and pulled himself up the ladder of the coal hopper and made his way over the coal pile.  He decided the only way he could add coal to the bunker was to do it by hand, so he grabbed a couple of big pieces and heaved them into the bunker.  Progress was slow, but Newt stuck to it and tossed coal until the light of dawn began to show and the bunker was full.  Newt, exhausted, dripping with sweat, and covered with coal dust, collapsed on the fireman's seat in the locomotive cab, waiting for the arrival of the train crew. He began to feel like he was overcoming his fear of accomplishment.

About that time, the conductor arrived at the engine.  He took a look at the coal bunker and asked Newt how he filled it up.  Newt explained that he loaded it by hand and it had taken him seven hours to do it.  With that explanation, the conductor put his hand on Newt's shoulder and said, "Son, why didn't you use the coal loader?"

Lesson learned.

                                                     hou(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240619133130.jpeg)

                                                                                            Newt's engine spotted in Sanlando Yard   

                                                           (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240619133801.jpeg)


                                                                               Coal hopper spotted adjacent to the Pacific's tender


                                                           (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240619133943.jpeg)
                                                                   
                                                                                          The coal loader was located next to the tracks
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on June 23, 2019, 07:44:36 PM
John - Are you able to post photos?  I am following Tom Langford's instructions to the "T" and it has always (or at least most of the time) worked before.  Now I am unable to attach photos.

I will try your suggestion on saving text.  Sounds like a winner.


Judge


I'm glad we solved part of the problem.  Is Tom having you add your pictures to the gallery and then copy the BB code into your post?  This is the way I post pictures and I'm pretty sure Tom is doing the same.  I did have a problem with picture size with the new server but resolved that issue with decreasing the resolution of my pictures before I try to add them to the gallery.  Let me know if Tom has you using the gallery and we will go from there.  Good luck!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on June 24, 2019, 09:57:01 AM
Deemery -   Do you know why the RR needs a track sweeper??


May it please the court, we'd like to offer the following into evidence:  https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/24/asia/japan-high-speed-train-slug-intl-hnk/index.html (https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/24/asia/japan-high-speed-train-slug-intl-hnk/index.html)


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 24, 2019, 10:49:15 AM
John - Are you able to post photos?  I am following Tom Langford's instructions to the "T" and it has always (or at least most of the time) worked before.  Now I am unable to attach photos.

I will try your suggestion on saving text.  Sounds like a winner.


Judge


I'm glad we solved part of the problem.  Is Tom having you add your pictures to the gallery and then copy the BB code into your post?  This is the way I post pictures and I'm pretty sure Tom is doing the same.  I did have a problem with picture size with the new server but resolved that issue with decreasing the resolution of my pictures before I try to add them to the gallery.  Let me know if Tom has you using the gallery and we will go from there.  Good luck!


John,

I've shown the Judge the gallery and the BB code several times. I'm not sure what the problem is.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 24, 2019, 01:47:28 PM
John, Tom, et al.  Happy Days!  I finally got the photos posted with the Engine Watchman story.  I think it was my internet connection that caused the problem.  I've been without cable TV for 4 days and my internet is spotty.  Take a look at the photos and you will understand why Newt was so upset after the conductor suggested using the coal loader.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on June 24, 2019, 01:52:23 PM
John, Tom, et al.  Happy Days!  I finally got the photos posted with the Engine Watchman story.  I think it was my internet connection that caused the problem.  I've been without cable TV for 4 days and my internet is spotty.  Take a look at the photos and you will understand why Newt was so upset after the conductor suggested using the coal loader.


Judge


Great news, great story, and great pictures.  Thanks again for this wonderful thread.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 24, 2019, 02:03:47 PM
John - You are more than welcome.  I really enjoy posting these little stories. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 24, 2019, 02:11:04 PM
John,

Thanks for all your help with the Judge. If you think his railroad stories are great you should hear some of the Vietnam stories.

I get a little hint of what the stories will be but not the whole story until it's posted.



Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 24, 2019, 02:12:58 PM
Bill,

Glad you got the photos up. BTW, my internet went down yesterday and this morning. Bright House said they are upgrading in some areas but didn't say where.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 29, 2019, 10:11:09 AM
    There is no Saturday Report this week due to the Babe's monthly trek to Mt. Dora.  I will be traveling that way this morning also.  My wife, Cindy, wants to have lunch at a restaurant there named The Goblin.  Don't ask me why.

    This week's story has a basis in fact from one of my cases I handled years ago.  Here goes -

                                                                                                        TAHOPE CODE TALKERS

    One of the more disreputable vagabonds living in The Bottoms is a tramp named "Wormy."  Wormy fled the Jenkins County Sheriff in Jaw-Ja several months ago and managed to catch a rattler (freight train)to sunny Florida.  He lives in a hut constructed of cast-off lumber and parts he found in a trash heap.  His hut is located next to Short Stack's lean-to.
    Everybody who claims permanent residence in The Bottoms has a job to perform for the good of the camp.  Wormy is the camp scavenger.  It is his job to scout around the local area looking for tid-bits that he can acquire through begging or theft as a contribution to the Mulligan Stew; or, on good days, some white lightning from the idle folk who have a still in Piney Woods.
    One summer afternoon in 1950, pickins were slim and the Mulligan Stew was wanting for edibles.  Wormy hot-footed it over to the Atlantic & Southern's commissary to see if there was anything useful in the garbage.  No luck there, so he slipped into the back door of the building and grabbed himself a large ham and a chicken.  He tried to exit through the back door but was recognized by one of the employees.  He hid the stolen ham and chicken next to one of the garbage cans near the back door and tried to make his getaway.  He was soon apprehended by Officer Poovey of the Tahope Police Department and given a ride to the Police Station. 
    Short Stack learned of Wormy's detention and traveled to the Police Station for a visit and to find out where Wormy stashed the vittles he stole from the commissary.  One of the police officers stood by in the visiting area while Wormy and Short Stack had their conversation.  The officer made sure he was close enough to overhear what they were saying.  Short Stack whispered a suggestion that they speak to each other in code to avoid detection.  The code they chose was "Pig Latin."  The conversation went as follows:

    Short Stack:  Id-day ou-yay et-gay uff-stay or-fay e-they ew-stay?
    Wormy:  Es-yay.  I-yay id-hay it-yay ear-nay e-they arbage-gay an-cay.
    Jailer:  I-yay eak-spay ig-pay atlin-lay and you are both are going to ail-jay.

    Well, the culprits were booked and when their court date arrived they appeared before Judge Elvin P. Thomas.  Attorney Marvin Bellow was present in the courtroom, but he did not represent the defendants because neither of them had his $10.00 fee. 
    Both defendants pled guilty to the petty therft charges and Judge Thomas sentenced them to 60 days in jail.  As they left the courtroom in handcuffs, Wormy said to Short Stack, "Ext-nay ime-tay ick-pay a-yay etter-bay ode-cay."
    As they say, "ime-cray oesn't-day  a-pay"

                                                                    (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-290619140304.jpeg)
                                                                                                                         

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on June 29, 2019, 04:20:10 PM
At-gray ory-stay Udg-jay!


We hit the Goblin Market any time we spend a weekend in Mt. Dora.  We're also fond of the Windsor Rose Tea Room and Cafe Gianni.  :D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on June 29, 2019, 05:55:42 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 29, 2019, 06:24:18 PM
I love the burgers at the Goblin's Market. The ones you can eat and not the ones you can pick.

Well, I guess you could eat both.  ??? ???


Tom  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 29, 2019, 08:32:02 PM
I'll agree with the gang....Goblin Market is one of our favorites in Mt. Dora also..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on July 06, 2019, 10:35:42 AM
This -sounds like- something from the Saturday Report:  https://abovethelaw.com/2019/07/judges-go-drinking-head-to-strip-club-get-involved-in-a-shooting-in-white-castle-parking-lot/


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 06, 2019, 05:53:20 PM
July 5, 2019 Saturday Report

The early morning was taken up with running a freight train powered by 2-8-2 # 835, a USRA PFM model that was originally acquired in May, 1978.  It has lasted longer than the prototype and pulled 12 freight cars and a brass caboose up the ovalix with ease.

We had four visitors in mid-morning, including regulars Greg DeMayo, Curt Webb, and Bob Butts.   A new addition to the mix was Rollin Smith from Zellwood, Florida.  We enjoyed a major bull session while your reporter ran 835 around The Midlands.  We all went to lunch at Smokey Bones and returned to watch Greg play engineer running the C&O's George Washington around the layout at Summit. 

A good time was had by all.

This week's story will be familiar to anyone who has had to put up with a snot nosed kid who has just been hired as the boss.

                                                                                                              The Stolen Donuts

    Anybody who works for the A&S Railroad knows the management hired this Assistant Superintendent from Tahope named Mr. Dyer (a lot of people who live in Tahope have medieval occupations as last names.)  Mr. Dyer was right out of college and a stickler for the rules.  He was the kind of a guy who couldn't handle a little power and authority without it going to his head.  He would drive next to the track beside an engine in downtown Tahope and write up an engineer for going a few miles over the speed limit. 
    There was a brakeman named Wally Weaver (Remember him?  He married the President's daughter).  Wally and Mr. Dyer did not see eye-to-eye on a single thing when it came to running a railroad.  Mr. Dyer went out of his way to call Wally on the carpet for minor infractions.  Here is an example of the trouble Wally had with MR. Dyer as told by Wally himself.

    "Well, one day ACL 835 was heading a drag freight into the Sanlando yard when it derailed with all eight drivers on the ground and the first three freight cars jack knifed accordian-like behind it.  There we were an hour before having to go on the law in drizzling rain and a mess that would take hours to clean up.  I was hind shack on this drag and the wreck caused the crummy quite a jolt. 
    We wuz havin' quite  problem in those days with somebody stealing our donuts.  We took turns bringin' a dozen each morning before the run and ate them with our coffee.  The donuts were stored on a rack next to the cupola.  By the time we tied down each evening there were always two or three donuts missing from the box and we couldn't figure out who was such a low down cuss that would steal them.
    Finally, the conductor, Capt'n Tanner, got the idea to buy some Ex-lax and melt it down to look like chocolate and spread it on top of some of the donuts.
    When the wreck happened, Capt'n Tanner had to walk up to the engine to take charge of the situation until the wrecking crew arrived.  I stayed in the crummy where it was dry.  Soon after the wreck happened, Mr. Dyer climbed into the crummy and proceeded to call me out because I had not walked a half mile behind the crummy to protect the rear of the train.  There was no danger because the yard switcher had cleared the mainline and we were well into the yard. Why do they make these college boys Assistant Superintendents?  They don't know an angle cock from a side rod.
    After he finished chewing my hind parts, Mr. Dyer spotted the box of donuts and calmed down.  He said, "Wally, Do you mind if I have a donut?"  I said, Sure, Mr. Dyer,, take all you want.  He took the three chocolate ones and ate them right then and there.  We walked up to the engine to see if the wrecking crew had arrived.  It wasn't but a few minutes when Mr. Dyer said he must be excused and disappeared, never to be seen again that evening.
    When I told Capt'n Tanner about the incident, he laughed as though his sides would split and said "It couldn't have happened to a nicer guy." 
    You know, we never did figure out who was stealing the donuts.  But it never happened again."

                                                                                 
                                                                       (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-060719175105.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on July 06, 2019, 07:49:54 PM
LOL. Great story Bill
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on July 07, 2019, 07:18:47 AM
And that's the truth of the matter.

Tom  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Dennis Bourey on July 07, 2019, 07:48:28 AM
Beautiful job. Judge........Dennis
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 07, 2019, 09:32:15 AM
Dave - Thanks for the link to the Indianapolis Whitecastle fiasco.  It is proof that judges as a group would rather eat cheap burgers than enjoy the calming atmosphere of a "Gentleman's Club." 

    Reminds me of an incident that occurred at a Circuit Court Conference here in Florida many years ago.  The conference is a week long affair that takes place at one of the many fancy resorts in Florida.  The week is devoted to judicial education and it is an opportunity for the more than 500 Circuit Judges in Florida to get to know each other.  (When I attended my first Conference in 1987, one of the judges from Tampa kind of took me around and and introduced me to other judges during one of the cocktail parties.  He said, "You should meet as many of your fellow judges as possible.  There is not a one of them from whom you cannot learn something, even if it is a bad example.")
    Back to my story...  At this particular conference one of our attractive new female judges attended a party given by the other judges in her circuit and it lasted until late in the evening.  Our new judge navigated back to her hotel room, stripped off her clothes, and passed out on her bed.  About 3:00 a.m she had to answer the call of nature and stumbled into her bathroom for relief.  On her way out of the bathroom she took a right instead of a left and walked into the hallway instead of the bedroom.  The door slammed behind her and there she was in her altogether locked out of her room. 
    Some of the judges attending the Conference discovered her and alerted the hotel staff, who let her back into her room. 
    Needless to say, the entire conference knew of the incident by breakfast the next morning.  One of the judges who discovered her naked in the hallway was asked why she didn't have her key with her.  He responded by saying "she didn't have any pockets." 
    Our heroine, by the way, did not last past the next election. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 07, 2019, 09:37:47 AM
It does seem that all large groups have a jerk like Dyer who makes life for all those around him a chore. To bad you can't take unpleasant types out and tie them down to the tracks right before the Limited comes roaring thru.  :)

But, I suppose there are laws about doing that sort of thing and it wouldn't be a good thing to have to appear before Judge Bill for breaking that law.  :o
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 07, 2019, 02:51:40 PM
Greg - It might be grounds for leniency.  Although I would never say that out loud.  Judges rarely get in trouble if they keep their mouths shut. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on July 08, 2019, 11:21:56 AM
Hey judge:

Great pic but sorry you had a wreck.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 08, 2019, 02:24:03 PM
Greg - It might be grounds for leniency.  Although I would never say that out loud.  Judges rarely get in trouble if they keep their mouths shut.


My ole' granddad always used to give that sage advice and it probably is a good idea for the rest of us not in the judiciary..... ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 13, 2019, 06:11:29 PM
Saturday Report July 13, 2019

The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours and discussed the current situation over Coke and Diet Pepsi.  It was reported that the Tahope City Council has approved the construction of a beer joint at the outskirts of the city near the citrus processing plant.  More about that another day.  Additionally, work is beginning on the bridge over the Tahope River to allow motor vehicle traffic to cross over into downtown Tahope. 

The mixed train that is the subject of this week's story made a run from Sanlando yard up to Summit.  It is amazing how long it takes to assemble a train and get it up the Ovalix and back to Sanlando.  Barrels of fun! 

After the freight train run we went to lunch at Smokey Bones.  The Babe jointed us for tea.

After lunch we made the George Washington go through its paces on Summit level. 

All-in-all a very successful and fun day.  No rain here, at least not yet.

Today's story is inspired by Lucius Bebee's famous book "Mixed Train Daily."  The A&S has a weekly mixed train.  What else is there to say?

                                                                                                           MIXED TRAIN WEEKLY

    A&S local mixed freight number 3 runs once a week.  The freight originates in the Sanlando yard and makes its way to Piney Woods, where it picks up a long string of pulpwood cars.  Then it is on to Tahope, where it sets out and picks up freight cars and picks up the only passenger car owned by the A&S, a heavy weight Pullman Solarium. The next move is up the 1% grade of the Ovalix all the way to Summit, where freight cars are picked up and set out at the various industries located there.  Passengers load and unload at the station at Summit.  The freight cars are broken up at the yard at Summit and await reassembly for their next destination.  Then the train returns to The Midlands where it spots the Pullman at its place in Tahope and then returns to the Sanlando Yard.
    Usually, Number 3 is powered by a GP7, but steam is still available for regular use on the A&S and today's power is a vintage ACL P3 Pacific, number 451, a 1914 Baldwin product that is hand fired.
    The trainmaster  worried that Old 451 would not make it up the grade of the Ovalix with so heavy a train so he scheduled number 3 ahead of regular freight number 128, with the intention of allowing 128's diesels to act as a helper, if necessary. 
    The conductor, Ralph Tinker, was pleased to see that Randy Bridgeman had drawn the engineer's job  on this trip.  Bridgeman was an experienced steam man and was very familiar with the abilities and quirks of Old 451.  The head shack, Roosevelt Green, was instructed that if Old 451 slowed to a crawl on the grade, he was to walk back down the Ovalix and flag number 128 to warn the crew to slow down and be ready for helper service. 
    Bridgeman backed into his train thirty minutes early, and after the angle cocks were connected, he waited for the air brakes  to be pressurized.  At departure time, the aspect on the signal called for a high ball and Bridgeman opened the throttle so Old 451 could ease out of the yard onto the mainline.  She passed Eaton's Curve and crossed the Great Divide, heading towards Piney Woods.  The crew picked up a long string of pulpwood cars and high balled it towards the Ovalix.  Bridgeman knew he had to be moving at least at 45 mph in order to make it up the grade to Summit and he didn't have far to go.  The fireman shoveled more coal on the fire and Old 451 strutted her stuff, spewing smoke and cinders everywhere.  By the time she reached the Ovalix, Old 451 was making 47 mph.  She was half way to Summit before she began to slow. 
    Meanwhile, the engineer on number 128 stopped his train at the bottom of the grade and asked his flagman, Walter Jackson, to walk forward, past the nose of the diesel, and listen to see if he could hear any of 451's stack talk.  When the flagman returned, he climbed back into the cab of the F3 and exclaimed, " Ain't no need to worry about that little old A&S hog.  She's up the Ovalix and headin' to Summit singin' "Home Sweet Home."
    Just another day on the A&S.

             (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-130719180003.jpeg)
                Past Piney Woods and on to the Ovalix

              (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-130719180247.jpeg)
                 Commin' Atcha!

               (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-130719180522.jpeg)
                    Old 451

               (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-130719180753.jpeg)
                 Pulpwood cars

                (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-130719180934.jpeg)
                Pullman Observation Solarum
                 
               


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on July 13, 2019, 06:52:31 PM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on July 14, 2019, 08:33:07 AM
And, that's just how the day went. When a loco on the A&S RR is singing "Home Sweet Home", all is well with the world.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on July 14, 2019, 11:06:53 AM
Love it!   ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Dennis Bourey on July 14, 2019, 01:23:42 PM
I Agree with Bob............Dennis
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 15, 2019, 10:07:13 PM
Bob, Curt, Dennis, Greg, & Carl - Thank you very much for your kind comments.  As you can imagine, I have a lot of fun with this Saturday Report and I appreciate your encouragement.

Next Saturday I am going to start introducing some new citizens of Tahope and will probably revisit a few we already know. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 16, 2019, 07:39:03 AM
Keep them coming Bill..... ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on July 16, 2019, 09:21:02 AM
Congratulations 451
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on July 16, 2019, 11:25:00 AM
The Saturday Repot is almost as good as being there.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 16, 2019, 10:20:46 PM
Miller and Mueller - Thank you for your kind comments. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 20, 2019, 10:07:51 AM
JUly 20, 2019 - Fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.  Where were you?  The attractive blond on the morning news this morning who was telling us all about it wasn't even born.  Neither were her parents. 

There is no formal Saturday Report today because the A&S CEO is under the weather with a bug that is going around. 

Your reporter did retrieve a re-decodered ACL E7A unit from the shops yesterday as well as the new Central of Georgia SD9.  The E7 had a defective decoder and TCS replaced it gratis with an updated version of WOW Sound.  The update also included one of the TCS new "bass speakers."  it makes a great deal of difference in the quality of the sound and we will probably update more locos with the new speakers.  The downside is that they are a little larger than the regular speakers and will not fit in every loco, including our new SD9.  Speaking of the SD9, some readers may ask how the A&S obtained such a loco in 1950 when EMD did not put them into production until 1954?  The answer is simple.  The C of G obtained the first demonstrator model from EMD in 1950 and used it in conjunction with EMD engineers for testing purposes.   The "on-line models" did not start running off the assembly line until four years later.  Everybody knows that.

This week's story concentrates on some of the "local color" in the City of Tahope, particularly the individuals who frequent the Trackside Tavern, a local beer joint.  We will be meeting Tahope residents of note from time to time, as we develop the saga of the A&S.



                                                                                                              TRACKSIDE TAVERN

    There is a wedge-shaped building located next to the citrus processing plant on the outskirts of Tahope named the Trackside Tavern. 
    In 1950 it was voted the best beer joint in Tahope County, and the competition for that title was fierce.  Not every beer joint was allowed to enter the contest - there were conditions of entry that had to be met.

    First, the joint could only serve beer - no wine, no booze.
    Second, no wives, no girlfriends, no smart-aleck college punks allowed.  MEN ONLY!
    Third, the juke box could only have country music - 78's or the new 45's.
    Fourth, it had to have at least two pool tables with shaded lamps on chains hanging from the ceiling.
    Fifth, outdoor plumbing was allowed, but two extra points were given if indoor plumbing was offered in addition. 
    Sixth, the only lighting allowed was from the lamps over the pool tables, the lights from the beer signs, and a light over the cash register.
    Seventh, the complete food menu could only consist of pickled sausage, pickled eggs, potato chips, and peanuts in shell (roasted or boiled.)

    You can see how the requirements would have narrowed the competition.

    Recently, there was a change in proprietors of the Trackside Tavern, following the trial and conviction of the previous owner.  Our old friend Bruce Bonebreaker returned from Bay County, Florida, where he had worked pulpwood for the St. Joe Paper Company.  (You remember Bruce, he shot and killed Sam Savage outside of Butt's Bar-B-Que and was acquitted of murder. (See the bottom of page eight).  He managed to purchase the joint with a government backed small business loan from Tahope State Bank.  Bruce is a rough neck who is about as mean as they come.  He was born with a tattoo.  Said he inherited it from his mother.

    The regular customer base for the joint is composed mostly of citrus plant workers, pulpwood workers from Piney Woods, and railroaders from the A&S Railroad.
 
    Sometimes fights break out in the joint and the Tahope City Police Department makes an arrest or two nearly every Friday and Saturday night.
 
    Bruce claims he has had enough run-ins with the law.  He hung up a sign near the pool tables that says "NO GAMBLIN!  Anybody caught gamblin will be prosuted,"
 
    One of the bartenders who works in the joint is Clovis Butcher, whose father is a fireman on the A&S Railroad.

    One day, as Clovis was tending bar about 3:00 in the afternoon, an old friend from Osceola County came in for a beer and to get reacquainted. 
    "Hello, Clovis," said the newcomer, "Last time I saw you we were both drunk."
    "Believe we were," said Clovis, " we used to go into some really bad places." 
    "Them wuz real dives," said the newcomer.  " I remember one of them places wuz so bad it had blood on the floor."
    "That's nuthin'," said Clovis, "here we got blood on the ceiling!"
    "Be on my way," said the newcomer, "place with blood on the floor don't bother me none, but blood on the ceiling, now that's a tough place."  "Gimme a beer and an egg.  Gonna drink it and git before I have to contribute to the decor."
    Strangers aren't all that welcome at the Trackside Tavern.  The slogan, "A Real Working Man's Bar" plastered on the side of the building means what it says!

                                                                     (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-200719100453.jpeg)

    As anyone can see, the Trackside Tavern has been set temporarily in its location pending completion of scenery on the Tahope Branch Line of the A&S.  We will probably revisit this establishment after it is placed permanently.


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on July 20, 2019, 10:31:40 AM
I think I was in that place in my earlier days. ;D ;D ;D  Back then Tahope was just a sleepy little town.

Jim

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on July 20, 2019, 11:45:29 AM
Quote
JUly 20, 2019 - Fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.  Where were you?

We were at our summer camp, driving home.  We pulled over at a gas station (Jackson Center, PA) to listen to "one small step." 

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on July 20, 2019, 01:45:26 PM

In port Officer of the Deck.
USS Josephus Daniels (DLG-27) at Destroyer & Submarine Piers, US Naval Base, Norfolk, VA.
Watched the event through a porthole in the Officers Mess.
Why the Navy ever named a ship after the SecNav who removed alcohol from Navy vessels is still beyond me.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on July 20, 2019, 09:36:57 PM
Great story Bill. I was 12 and watched the landing at home on the TV.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on July 21, 2019, 07:15:17 AM
UF Political Science class and waiting for baby #2 (son) to arrived. He did, seven days later.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 21, 2019, 08:11:38 AM
Pegi and I were at our apartment in college watching history on our 12" black and white TV. It was a memorable month as we had just celebrated our 1st anniversary two weeks earlier..... :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Oldguy on July 21, 2019, 11:34:57 AM
I had recently reported to my duty station, the USS Truxton DLG(N) 35, in Long Beach.  We didn't have a TV on board and I wasn't into reading the newspaper back then.  So I heard about it second hand.  Actually, the biggest news back then was all about the Tate-LaBianca murders, albeit a month later.  I didn't know it at the time, but I had driven by the Tate murder scene about the time it was occurring.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on July 22, 2019, 03:15:21 PM
I was 11 at the time and watched it at home.

Methinks asking for a 'lite' beer in the Trackside Tavern would be a serious mistake.   ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on July 22, 2019, 04:55:43 PM
I was working at the time and did not have access to a TV, but I remember watching the Launch out the window from my desk..

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 22, 2019, 10:42:50 PM
I was stationed at Ft. Bragg, N.C. and awaiting October deployment to Vietnam.   I watched the launch and the landing on my 14" RCA color TV I bought at J. M. Fields. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Dave K. on July 23, 2019, 07:39:29 AM
I was 8. Just sayin'.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Dennis Bourey on July 23, 2019, 09:53:56 AM
Dido......I was 8 also ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 27, 2019, 04:14:37 PM
July 27, 2019 Saturday Report - Atlantic & Southern Railroad

The Board of Director's meeting began promptly at 0830 this morning.  Everyone was in a good mood knowing the air conditioner was working - and for a 26-year old unit it really puts out the negative BTU's. 

There was a celebration over the delivery of the refurbished ACL E7, complete with updated TCS WOW Sound decoder and a new "bass" speaker.  The speaker makes a noticeable difference in the sound.  We may install several of these in our larger locomotives.  The speaker won't fit in GEEP units or steamers with small tenders.

The new Central of Georgia SD9 was also delivered.  It is a great addition to the roster.

We started the morning's operations off by moving the C&O's George Washington from where it was spotted at Summit down to the Bottoms.

Then we ran the ACL Champion with the E7's.  The passenger cars in the consist are among the oldest in our inventory and we had problems with the train breaking in two on the Ovalix.  The A&S Director of Maintenance, Will Fixer, towed the car causing the trouble to the shop and, after a coupler adjustment, it was returned to service.

The new SD9 was put through its paces by pulling a pulpwood train from The Midlands to Summit and dropping the consist at Summit Yard.  There were orders awaiting the engine at Summit and it coupled onto a mixed freight, which it hauled down the Ovalix to The Midlands and through the Taahope Branch Line, returning by way of the reverse loop.

Greg DeMayo graced us with his presence about 10:30 and we all went to lunch at smokey Bones. 

After lunch, there was a general bull session and some more running the SD9.

This week's story takes place in 1862, during the War of Northern Aggression.  It clears up a number of fake news reports at the time, mostly from New York newspapers, concerning the facts of what has become known as "The Great Locomotive Chase."  I promise, this will be the last of these Civil War stories, at least for a while.

                                                                                             The Truth About the Great Locomotive Chase   

Many of the inhabitants of Tahope County have ancestors who fought on the side of the Confederacy during the Civil War. 

For instance, Willard Woodman's great-grandfather Sam "Goat" Woodman "tuck up arms" shortly after Florida succeeded from the Union and joined the C.S.A.'s 44th Railroad Transportation Company, whose motto was "You call, we haul, y'all." 

Goat, who had prior experience, was promoted to sergeant and became a fireman shortly after he enlisted.   The 44th was assigned to the Western & Atlantic RR for duty.  Goat and his engineer ran a little American (4-4-0) type engine named "General" every day from Atlanta to Chattanooga and back, delivering arms, ammunition, and infantry replacements on the way up and delivering the dead and wounded on the return trip. 

On April 12, 1862, the General was "wooded up" and "took on water" at a little place north of Atlanta called Big Shanty, Georgia (pronounced "Jaw-Ja").  Captain W.A.Fuller was the conductor of the mixed passenger train that day and Goat Woodman was the fireman.  Capt. Fuller and the engineer decided to get some "eats" while the General was being serviced and instructed Goat to remain with the engine while they were gone.

Goat looked about and saw no reason to remain in the cab of the General because it was hot in there when the engine wasn't moving, so he decided to wander a ways down the track and find a place to rest in the shade.

About the time he was good and comfortable, he heard a great deal of commotion near the engine. A group of armed men ordered the few passengers aboard off the train and climbed in the General's cab.  The locomotive started off into the direction of Chattanooga, leaving the crew behind. 

We all know the leader of these bandits was a Yankee major named Andrew.  He was later captured and hanged, not for the theft of the General, because it never left W&A property, but for espionage as a Union spy.  The Confederate legal system was a stickler for getting it right.

So, for quitting his post without authority and allowing the Andrews Raiders to capture the General, Sam Woodman was busted to the grade of private and reassigned to the Atlanta locomotive repair facility, where he finished out the war without firing a shot. It was because of the incident at Big Shanty that Sam Woodman acquired the name of Goat, which he carried with him to his grave in 1913.

Few people know the truth of the story of the Andrew's Raid and current renditions of the tale tend to make it out as something it wasn't.  But folks born and raised in Tahope know the truth and speak highly of Goat Woodman, who was one of the few Tahope residents who made a name for himself during the war.


                                                                    (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-270719153431.jpeg)                                                                                                                                       
 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on July 27, 2019, 04:29:31 PM
Another great one Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on July 27, 2019, 04:47:38 PM
I hope you never run out of stories Bill

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on July 27, 2019, 06:37:59 PM
Folks, there's a lot of history involving the Tahope descendents. Some of it believable and some not so much. However, I must say, as I cross my fingers, it's all true.

We have descendents of General Nathan B. Forrest living in and around Tahope. To the south and north of the lubritorium stands the great forest of Bedford Forest.

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/24-270719183659.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on July 27, 2019, 08:59:56 PM
Dido......I was 8 also ;)


I was 12 and attending a Boy Scott summer camp.  The only building at the camp with power was the mess hall. The staff brought in TV's and lined them up along the front porch of the building. Some of the biggest TV's I had ever seen. Probably 25 inch. :o ;) ;D  We all sat in front of the TV's for hours watching - we could look up at the moon over the lake and then back at the TV's. A great way to watch the landing.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on July 27, 2019, 09:02:23 PM
Bill


Another great story. Keep them coming.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 28, 2019, 02:05:21 PM
Your reporter failed to provide proof of purchase of the new Central of Georgia SD9.  Here is photographic evidence with the SD9 spotted on A&S track.


                                                        (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-280719135515.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on July 29, 2019, 09:11:20 AM
Judge,

I never tire of your stories or the photos in this thread.  Keep 'em coming!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 03, 2019, 10:49:49 AM
August 3, 2019
   
This is the monthly weekend when "the Babe" gets her hair done in Mount Dora and Tom visits the Pennsy at Bill and Chris Cutler's place.  So there is no report from the A&S today.
    However, the A&S did recently receive two Illinois Central E8A units and they are being converted to WOW sound and should be on line to pull the City of Miami next week.  How do I.C. diesels find their way to a Florida swamp you may ask?  The answer is the Miami to Chicago passenger train found its way onto ACL tracks due to a pooling arrangement with the I.C.  I was privileged to ride the "City" from Chicago to Florida in 1954.  My father was a banker and he attended a banker's convention in Chicago.  We went up to Chicago on the "Dixie Flagler" and came back on the "City."  My father pulled some strings and got us a cab ride on both trains.  We rode in NC&St.L F3 diesels from Chattanooga to Nashville and through Southern Illinois on the way back.  I got to blow the horn a couple of times.

    This week's story continues the adventures of Newt Fisher, whose parents, Tallula and Luke, live in one of the cracker shacks on Eaton's curve. (See p.eight)  Some time ago, Newt decided that life as a bum in the bottoms was not for him so he tried his hand as and engine watchman. Newt has certain limitations, including the fact that he got his intelligence genes from his mother, and his pathological fear of accomplishment. 

                                                                                                   Striking It Rich on a Student Trip

    Newt Fisher managed to learn the ropes on how to be a successful "engine watchman" (See p.eighteen) after only a few weeks of that duty and, since the job was never intended to be a permanent position, Newt was promoted to temporarily try his luck as a student fireman.
    Now, the A&S management knew Newt had certain limitations, so the yardmaster was directed to assign him to A&S #7, , an oil fired 2-6-6-2.  This avoided the distinct possibility that Newt would fail to grasp the complexities of hand firing a coal burner.
    Newt reported for duty the next day only to find the conductor, engineer, and the regular fireman conversing about the day's run, which was to haul a train of pulpwood from Piney Woods up to Summit and return with some empties.  Old #7 was the best choice to pick up pulpwood due to the light rail on the Piney Woods spur.
    George "Crack-a-diamond" Musselwhite was the assigned fireman for the run.  He had been firing steam locomotives for many years and had trained many a student fireman. 
    George "tuck Newt aside" and explained a fireman's duties to him.  The Bunker C fuel oil used on oil fired engines is as thick as sludge when it is not heated and that is why oil burners have a heater in the tender's fuel bunker.  Oil heated properly will liquify and flow through the atomizer more easily when it is injected into the firebox.  Newt was told to turn the heater on and occasionally put his hand on the back of the fuel bunker tank.  "When it feels hot, it's hot enough."  Newt turned the heater on high and promptly forgot all about it.
    The engineer assigned that day, "Fatso" Johnson, gave #7's three chime whistle two short blasts and eased out into the yard with only a caboose in tow.  George, confident that Newt could follow instructions and handle the fireman's job for the short trip to Piney Woods, stepped off the engine at the yard limit, intending to rejoin the crew on the trip to Summit.
    There is a problem when the oil in the fuel bunker gets too hot.  It starts to bubble.
    The temperature in the fuel bunker kept going up and up as #7 chugged its way to Piney Woods and it began to bubble.  It wasn't long before it started bubbling out of the tank onto the deck.  Then a geyser shot out of the dip stick hole and spewed hot oil all over the cab of the engine, much to the discomfort of its occupants.
    Newt, quickly realizing his mistake, shut off the heater, climbed on the tank, and shut the dip stick hole.
    The rest of the trip was unpleasant to say the least.  However, when #7 returned to the roundhouse, the maintenance crew cleaned up the mess using sand, kerosene, and a steam hose.  It took Newt and "Fatso" as long to scrub the oil off of their bodies as it did to clean the engine.
    The yardmaster realized anyone can make mistakes the first day on a job, and, since no permanent harm was done to employees or equipment, Newt received no discipline other than a stern warning.
    The does not mean Newt didn't hear about it from his peers.  "Fatso" Johnson told the roundhouse crew how the incident happened and the word rapidly spread that Newt was the only A&S employee in history who ever struck oil in Florida.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on August 03, 2019, 10:59:18 AM
Great Story Bill.  Hope you have many more stored somewhere.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on August 03, 2019, 11:09:59 AM
Great story Bill.....I used to take the City of Miami to visit my Mom's relatives in Missouri each summer when I was a kid and then at the beginning and end of the school year when I was at Mizzou for college.....loved it.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on August 03, 2019, 01:15:22 PM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on August 03, 2019, 07:02:28 PM
Another enjoyable story Bill.  Always fun reading them!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 10, 2019, 03:12:01 PM
August 10, 2019
Big day today.  The A&S took delivery of the newly repowered Illinois Central E8A's.  We waited over two years for delivery.  They are a thing of beauty and run like a watch.  They will power the City of Miami.  The diesels are in the A-B-A configuration, with the middle B unit pleasing, but unpowered.  (It is certainly no "dummy.")  The plan is to replace the provided speakers with the new TCS WOW Sound enhanced bass speakers. We have already installed one of those speakers in an ACL E7A and it really improves the realism of the sound.  The IC passenger cars are all lighted and loaded with passengers.  Mostly streamlined cars but a few heavyweights thrown in so our passengers can have the option of a 14-section "Battleship."  The prototype City of Miami ran from Chicago to Miami.  It retained the IC diesels until it arrived in Jacksonville.  The FEC provided the power from Jax to Miami.  We will ultimately have a version of the Jax terminal at Summit and will change IC E8's for FEC E7's.  But that will probably be sometime next year.  There is still work to do on the Tahope branch and Tom is very busy building structures to be placed on the south side of the Tahope River.  In keeping with the policy of ignoring environmental concerns, the Tahope City Council has approved construction of a pest control facility on the south bank of the Tahope Rive with runoff directly into the river. 

The SBG (Saturday Buddy Group) met at 10:00. We ran the new City of Miami around the Midlands and up to Summit.  Lunch at Smokey Bones, as usual.

Here is a photo of the lead IC E8A, taken during her maiden voyage through the Midlands.

                                                                       (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-100819143700.jpeg)

This week's story follows the adventures of Newt Fisher, who, as you might remember, is cousin to Shortstack and recently decided to leave The Bottoms for gainful employment.  He worked as an engine watchman with mixed success, but managed to get promoted to student fireman.  His first day on the job was a little rocky (Pager ten) but he stuck with it and today he is a man of experience firing an oil burning steamer.

                                                                                                   Oops!  We're Taking on Water

There is an old saying, "the coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco."  The originator of that saying never spent a winter in sunny Central Florida.  It gets bone chilling cold for a few days each winter.  The thermometer drops down to a few degrees below freezing, but the humidity remains at 80%.  When the wind blows from the north it is like standing in ice water.

One chilly February morning in 1950, the temperature dropped below freezing  when Number 7 pulled out onto the mainline.  She needed water for the run to Piney Woods, so the engineer, "Fatso" Johnson, spotted her under the water tank spout at Sanlando.

                                                                          (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-100819151538.jpeg)
 

Newt climbed up on the tender and opened the man hole that covered the water tank on the tender.  He reached the spout with a tank hook and pulled it down to where he could reach it.  The spout had a little step on it which needed the weight of a man in order to hold it into the tank.  The fireman had to stand on that step or the spout would jump out of the tank and drench the unwary tallow pot.

Newt put his foot on the step, pulled the chain that allowed the water to flow, and began to fill the tank.  But the deck was icy and his foot slipped, causing the spout to rise and ice cold water hit him square in the chest, nearly knocking him off the tender.  By the time he got the contraption under control, he was drenched and chilled to the bone.

"Fatso" saw Newt's predicament and motion him back into the cab.  "Strip naked, Newt," he said, "we have enough water to get to make it to Summit and your clothes can dry on the back head on the way.  So, Newt stripped and fired Number 7 naked all the way to Piney Woods and up the Ovalix to Summit.  By the time they arrived at Summit Newt's clothes were dry and he rode back to the roundhouse in more modest condition. 

"Fatso" Johnson couldn't resist telling the tale to the roundhouse crew and Newt became known as "Nudist Newt," the only fireman to fire an engine completely au naturel.

And that's the truth!


                                                                 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on August 10, 2019, 03:45:31 PM
Glad there weren't any pictures of Newt working in his birthday suit on this family friendly forum  ;D .....great yarn Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on August 10, 2019, 04:29:04 PM
Glad there weren't any pictures of Newt working in his birthday suit on this family friendly forum  ;D .....great yarn Bill.  8)


Greg,

Yarn, nothing, it's the God awful truth!

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on August 10, 2019, 05:27:26 PM
Awesome Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on August 10, 2019, 06:36:14 PM
Once again a great entertaining story Judge.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on August 10, 2019, 08:23:38 PM
Great story Bill.  One of the few times on the forum when we love not having pictures.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on August 10, 2019, 11:13:57 PM
Great Story Bill.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on August 10, 2019, 11:19:41 PM
And all along I believed the Florida panhandle was the only really cold part of Florida during the winter.
Silly me.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on August 11, 2019, 09:07:36 AM
Glad there weren't any pictures of Newt working in his birthday suit on this family friendly forum  ;D .....great yarn Bill.  8)


Greg,

Yarn, nothing, it's the God awful truth!

Tom  ;D


and you think I didn't believe every work that was written..... :) :) ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on August 11, 2019, 12:48:56 PM



and you think I didn't believe every work that was written..... :) :) ;)
[/quote]

Every WORK ??????

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on August 12, 2019, 08:14:59 AM



and you think I didn't believe every work that was written..... :) :) ;)

Every WORK ??? ???

Jim



Okay James.....I was in a hurry.....I'll change it when I gets a minutes.  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on August 12, 2019, 01:10:48 PM
Hey:

everything is looking just beautiful. Keep those great pics flowing.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 17, 2019, 05:17:25 PM
August 17, 2019.
The weekly meeting of the A&S Board of Directors started on time at 0830 hours.  The progress on the pest control business was examined and it will soon be placed on the shores of the Tahope River, where it will no doubt make a major contribution to polluting the water.  All of this has been approved by the Tahope City Council, considering the mayor is the owner's cousin. 

We put the new IC diesels through their paces on the Summit level and then decided to bring the Pennsy Coal train up from the Bottoms on its regular run delivering coal to the Tahope Power Company and Hog Exchange.  Those Sharks really sound good with authentic Baldwin prime mover power and real Baldwin horns,  The A-B-A lash-up has no problem climbing the Ovalix with 21 cars and the train tracks very well.  As you might remember, the Pennsy has an agreement with the A&S to provide a regular coal supply to Tahope and, in the winter months, a section of the Pennsy's Broadway Limited swings south over ACL tracks to assist bringing snow birds to sunny Central Florida.
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-170819163824.jpeg)  (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-170819164032.jpeg)
                                                                                                               

Jim and CLaire Miller and Greg DeMayo visited us and a general bull session took place until time for lunch at Smokey Bones. 

The bull session continued after lunch until about 1400 hours, when the day was declared over just prior to the daily afternoon thunderstorm.

This week's story involves a geographic feature of the A&S called "The Great Divide."  It is a bottomless canyon over which bridges are placed on all three levels of the railroad.  The Great Divide is located at the north end of the railroad and separates the east side from the west side.  Failure to put the bridges in place can result in catastrophe.   Hence, the misadventures of Newt and Short Stack continue.

                                                                                                       The Ride to the Great Divide

Newt Fisher continued his assignment on the pulpwood train as a student fireman on into the spring.  He had proven his abilities to the satisfaction of the A&S management and was approved for duty firing a coal burning locomotive. 

Early one morning Newt was called to fire a train of pulpwood cars from Piney Woods to the paper mill in Jacksonville.  The regular engineer, "Fatso" Johnson, was assigned elsewhere and Russel "Ballast Scorcher" Taylor , an engineer from Jacksonville, deadheaded to Tahope the night before on the Florida Special to make this run.  Taylor was familiar with local conditions, because he was born and raised in Tahope and had kin still living there. (Many Tahope natives have last names reflecting midieval occupations.)

The engine assigned to the run, a USRA Pacific, was coupled to a caboose and the train proceeded in reverse from the Sanlando yard for the short trip to Piney Woods.  This configuration meant the view of the bridge around Eaton's curve would be blocked from the engineer's side of the train.  Taylor would have to rely on Newt's vigilance to make sure the bridge was in place across The Great Divide. 

This being Newt's first day firing a coal burning steamer, he felt a little nervous and asked Taylor if he would mind if his cousin Short Stack rode in the cab as far as Piney Woods.  Taylor said he didn't mind and Short Stack climbed into the cab. 

When Taylor whistled off to proceed, he instructed Newt to look out the fireman's side window as the train approached Eaton's Curve. 

Newt hung out the fireman's side window and the cool morning breeze lulled him fast asleep.  Consequently, he did not notice that the bridge was "out" and the caboose was only eight or ten can lengths from the edge of the drop-off. 

Fortunately, Short Stack was alert and observed the approaching peril.  He let out a shriek and Taylor put her into emergency.  The jolt of the sudden brake application woke Newt and the engine screeched to a stop less than three feet from the edge of The Great Divide.

The conductor climbed down from the caboose and demanded an explanation from the engineer.  It was obvious who was at fault and when Newt returned to the roundhouse he lost his student fireman status and went on the extra board as a brakeman.

When asked to explain himself, Newt, who has a pathological fear of accomplishment, said, "I almost did something right today, but I went to sleep."

For his part in the incident, Taylor was given a week's unpaid vacation.  Short Stack was reinstated to his job of "sweeping up" at the roundhouse.

                                                           (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-170819170922.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on August 17, 2019, 05:45:37 PM
Another gem Bill.  Sorry I missed the festivities today.   :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on August 17, 2019, 05:50:45 PM
Whew, that was close! Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on August 17, 2019, 05:51:27 PM
Judge,

I think the boys on the A&S just proved the world is flat!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on August 17, 2019, 06:47:26 PM
Hey Judge:

Great photos. Thanks for sharing.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on August 17, 2019, 07:54:24 PM
As a witness to todays story, I can say that "it's the truth and nothing but the truth, so help me God"

Trust me, this is a true story, as reported by the Judge.

Jim


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on August 18, 2019, 07:41:48 AM
Yepper, "shor tis da truff ".
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on August 18, 2019, 08:26:53 AM
What a great time to forget my hip boots..... ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 18, 2019, 09:16:15 AM
Jerry, Greg, Jim, Curt et al.  - Thanks for taking the time to comment on my little stories.  I am amazed at the number of times the Saturday Report is accessed during the week. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 20, 2019, 02:23:55 PM
The rest of the story.
I ran across this u-tube video this morning and thought I would use it to illustrate just how blind Russel Taylor was backing around Eaton's curve.  This clip involves a railfan who is lucky enough to get to run a GP9 back and forth for a couple of hundred yards.  I'm not impressed with our hero or his camera ability, but I am jealous of his opportunity.  Anyway, notice how poor the vision is in general and how blind the engineer is on a curve.  Having a Pacific size boiler sticking out in front of your view would give the same effect.  No wonder the railroads kept firemen to watch out the left side on these diesels.  Wonder what's going on with all those UP diesels spotted on the side tracks? Is this a scrap line? 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doC_tZNxbro
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 24, 2019, 03:45:03 PM
Saturday Report August 24, 2019

The Board of Directors met at 0830 hours.  The meeting was short.  The only business was the question of acquisition of certain equipment including Southern RR passenger cars.  It was agreed that the A&S didn't have a dire need for more Southern equipment but, what the heck, it was on sale and no one knows what will happen to the Chinese market - and even if things work out, these cars will not be priced this low again.  Other miscellaneous purchases were made.  Next week will be a work day.  We are going to reorganize the placement of our freight and passenger trains, which are spotted on the ready on the Bottoms storage tracks.  There are nine tracks of varying lengths on each side so getting our long trains organized will be a fun challenge.

We started out the fun part of the day by running the new City of Miami on the Summit level.  Then we moved the Shark powered coal train to the Bottoms and brought up the tank car unit train.  The new C of G SD9 was put into her paces and she traveled up the Ovalix to Summit to pick up additional freight revenue. Greg DeMayo arrived about 10:30 and, after more running of the SD9, we traveled to Smokey Bones for lunch. 

The Babe made us cup cakes for desert and we ran a steamer through downtown Tahope.  We ran a diesel powered freight on the same route and the trip did not end until after nightfall.  The lights on the railroad are really super at night.

In the the story this week, we will attend the weekly Thursday night poker game that takes place on the A&S Pullman Solarium lounge and sleeping car that is spotted at the freight station in Tahope.  This game is closed to all except prominent local officials.  The car is available for weekend trips to Gainesville during football season to watch the Gators play football.

Readers who keep up with the goings on in Tahope know that Bruce Bonebreaker recently purchased the Trackside Tavern.  That establishment is described on page 21 of this thread.  It is a "rough place."  So rough, it has blood on the ceiling.

The Trackside Tavern was the subject  of discussion at this week's poker game.

                                                                                                     TAHOPE AIN'T LIKE NEW YORK

The Mayor, the Police Chief, the Fire Marshal, the City Attorney, and the President of the Tahope State Bank were playing poker one Thursday night several weeks ago in the Pullman Solarium lounge and sleeper car the A&S owns and makes available for use by such dignataries, when the subject of the Trackside Tavern came up. 

"Tahope's famous beer joint is getting quite a reputation," said the Chief.  "Making money had over fist."  "How's that?" asked the Mayor, "Bonebraker is only selling beer, pickled eggs and sausage.  And he's giving away the peanuts."

"Oh," said the Chief, "I dropped in the place one afternoon a few weeks ago and Bonebreaker set up a stage facing the bar.  He bought me a beer and put a nickel in the juke box and out came this young lady dressed in one of them new bikini outfits and she got on the stage and wiggled to beat all." 

"Bonebreaker asked me if'n I had any problems with that and I said I wouldn't say even if I did." 

"Then he signaled the girl, her name was Tawdry, and darned if she didn't slip the top of her bikini off and commence to wiggling and jiggling.  Then Bonebreaker asked me, "Do you see anything wrong with that?"  "And I said, There's got to be something wrong with that but I cain't say whut it is.  Maybe I better have another beer." 

"Then the girl walked over to where we were sitting and she leans down to me and says," "Table Daintz?"  "Well, I didn't know what to think about that so I said, yes.  With that, doncha know, she got up on our table and tuck off her bikini bottom and went to wiggling and a jiggling right there on the table. 

"What did you say to that? said the bank president?"  "Waal," said the Chief, "after a couple of hours had passed, I said Bonebreaker, Tahope is a far cry from New York and I recon I'll have to get Judge Thomas to put a stop to this improper exhibition."

"By the way," said the Mayor, "Were is Judge Thomas?  He's usually on his third drink of bourbon by this time of night.  Game ain't the same without us taking his money from the pot." 

"He ain't far," said Walter the bartender, " I sees him a-commin' up the road right now."

When the judge arrived and was briefed on the situation he said, "Well, you boys get Marvin here to file a complaint and I'll take testimony with the Tahope Daily Blatter present and make a ruling as soon as the Chief explains exactly what happened." 

"You mean this will all be in open court?" said the Chief.  "Of course, said the judge."  "If that be the case, maybe we ought to forget the whole thing." 

With that, the City Attorney, Marvin Bello, stated, "Chief, if you don't shut him down there's nothing the city can do.  He ain't violating no city ordinances and his licenses are current."

After several weeks went by, the Thursday night poker club members noticed the Trackside Tavern was closed and boarded shut.  "How'd that happen? said the City Attorney. I didn't file suit."

"Foreclosed the mortgage," said the bank president.  And the reputation of Tahope was saved.

                                                   (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-240819155339.jpeg)

                                                          A&S Solarium car conveniently spotted next to the Trackside Tavern
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on August 24, 2019, 06:38:54 PM
Great story.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on August 25, 2019, 11:52:36 AM
Bill, I really love all these "True" Stories about the citizens of Tahope and surrounding areas. ;) ;) ;)

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 31, 2019, 03:37:54 PM
August 31, 2019

Well, you would think the off-shore hurricane would cause us to pay attention to the weather, and maybe we will on Tuesday/Wednesday.  It was last week when one of Florida's famous summer lightning storms fried the power supply for the A&S Railroad.  As luck would have it, no replacements were available locally so one was ordered from Digitrax.  The lack of power did not rule out a brief meeting of the A&S bored directors and we had salads at Smokey Bones.  Afterwards, the track maintenance crew was installed for the photo accompanying this week's story and, after marveling at the new pest control building and the apiary for the bee keeper, we called it a day.

This week's story is one of a bad first day on the job.  Everybody has had one of those, but our Bottoms dweller, Short Stack, has more than his share.  Recall his mishap backing Number 71 into the turntable pit and his arrest for almost stealing a locomotive.  It seems when time passes, memories fade, so Short Stack was rehired as the jack man on the A&S's track maintenance section.

                                                                                                 Short Stack and the Section Foreman

After Pat O'Malley passed away, his partner, Michael O'Toole was promoted to chief civil engineer.  They sent another great big Irishman named Malone to take the track maintenance section.  The events that took place on Malone's first day on the job are related here by one of the Irish section workers, Brian O'Sullivan.

"Malone whas a fine man.  Being Irish, he liked his whiskey, but he never did ask the section to buy him none.  That summer they hired this fella named Short Stack to be the jack man on the track.  We was removing abandoned rail on the north end of the Midlands and it whas one hot day - temperature in the high 90's. 

"When noon came, we got our lunch pails, and as we wear all used to the hot sun, we sat right doon on the track to eat our lunch.   Malone took his coat and laid it on the track to sit on to keep the rail from burning him, as the sun had heated the rail hotter than a cooking stove.  When he throwed his coat doon it landed on a rail joint which whas opin about an inch, maybe more."

"That mornin' Short Stack had broken the handle on his spike mall and he go to fixin' it while we ate lunch so he would have it when we started back to werk.  He got the new handle in place and needed to test it so he gave a good wack to the end of the rail ware Malone whas sitting.  He never thought the blow would cause the rail joint to close, but it went together with a bang and caught the flesh of Malone's hind parts and took out a slug as big as fifty cents.  We had to pull him off that joint and he hollowed bludy murder and everything else he could hollow."

"We hauled him to Tahope to Doc Staysic and he had a bad time with it.  He showed it to me after it healed up and you would never think it would make the scar that it did."

"Short Stack visited Malone in the hospital and made his peace with him.  Malone knew he didn't mean to do it, but when the conversation ended, Short Stack thought it best to return to life in The Bottoms.

                                                                       (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-310819154401.jpeg)

                                                                                That's O'Sullivan in the brown overalls, watching the drama.  Short Stack is wearing
                                                                                                the yellow shirt and Malone is kneeling.  Photo taken before lunch.
                                                                         
                                                                     
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on August 31, 2019, 04:42:23 PM
Sounds quite painful.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on September 01, 2019, 08:04:31 AM
Wez gotz sum mighty fine folks work'n for us'n on the A&S RR. Only the finest employees.

That hurt just read'n it.  :'(

Tom  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Rollin on September 01, 2019, 08:56:24 AM
It's just like the butcher who backed into his meat grinder...he got a little behind in his work.  OUCH!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on September 01, 2019, 09:16:05 AM
That had to hurt..... ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on September 01, 2019, 11:48:46 AM
OUCH!!!!!!

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on September 01, 2019, 01:20:43 PM
Ouch is right!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on September 07, 2019, 11:06:49 AM
September 7, 2019

Well, fellow railroaders, there is no Saturday report today for two reasons.  The A&S Railroad is shut down because the new power source has not arrived to replace the one that was fried by a lightning strike some days before the drizzle passed through Central Florida called Hurricane Dorian.   It is on order from Digitrax and hopefully will arrive this week.  Additionally, and more importantly, today is the Babe's hair-do day and so the A&S CEO is off to Mount Dora.

There will be a new story today.  However, it will not be accompanied by photographs.  I got the idea for this story from an old Trains magazine from the 1940's.  The A&S Railroad is dated in the early 1950's and I remember as a little boy seeing brakemen walking on top of moving boxcars.  All freight cars had air brakes then so maybe walking the tops of boxcars was the way to get from the engine to the caboose.

                                                                                                                MIXED SIGNALS

    As the A&S grew in revenue, the need for additional trains became evident.  Freight trains were added between Tampa, Orlando, Tahope, and Jacksonville.  The ACL added a second section to the Champion in the winter season and the SAL added a second section to the Silver Meteor.  Additional trains meant additional employees and a notice was posted at the roundhouse and in City Hall advertising for brakemen trainees.
    One of the veteran engineers on the A&S was a crusty old Irishman named Uncle Henry O'Leary.  Uncle Henry usually was assigned to the local freight that made its way from Tahope to Summit.  Uncle Henry's practice was to head into the wye at Summit and cut off the engine from the freight, finish switching, recouple to the train , and finish the run.
    Well, on this particular day he drew one of the new brakemen, a local boy named Oliver Carpenter, who had only two weeks experience.  He showed up wearing cotton pants and a shirt instead of overalls and he wore a black cowboy hat instead of a railroader's hat.  When Uncle Henry drew near the first leg of the wye, the new apprentice was atop the second boxcar.  To keep the wind from blowing his hat away, he stuffed it into his back pocket.  The hind shack stuck his head up over the roof of the last boxcar and pattted his head to signal that Uncle Henry would pull into the wye engine first.  Carpenter did not know what the signal meant, and thinking the hind shack was worried he had lost his hat, he turned his back to him and patted his right hip pocket. 
    With that, the hind shack exploded with a variety of choice expletives and descriptive adjectives and turning to the conductor said, "Look at that so and so brakeman.  He's broke here only two weeks and when I tell him Uncle Henry's going to head in, he says he's going to back around and run in.  Where do they get these greenhorns?
    Probably from the Bottoms.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on September 08, 2019, 08:16:37 AM
Another good one Bill.....good help is always hard to find, especially if you have to go to The Bottoms.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on September 08, 2019, 09:49:41 AM
Glad to see we had another great story this week in spite of the RR's downtime.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on September 14, 2019, 04:32:38 PM
Saturday Report - September 14, 2019

    The Board of Directors of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad convened at 0815 for the usual Saturday morning con-fab.  No serious business was conducted but your reporter got to inspect the new building to be erected in Tahope south of the river.  Your reporter also  tried his hand at "speed matching" of the newly acquired E8A units lettered for Illinois Central's City of Miami.  Speed matching can be done through verbal commands without resorting to the program track.  Just another feature of TCS WOW Sound decoders.  The attempt was pretty successful for a first try.  We ran the "City" around Summit and down to the Midlands before spotting it in the Bottoms.  We also moved several passenger cars into their proper locations on the East Side storage tracks.  Next week we will organize some of the freight trains on the West Side.
    We have a 20+ car reffer train powered by ACL F3's and we delivered the goods in the reefers throughout the Midlands, including a trip through downtown Tahope. 
    Greg Demayo arrived about 1030 and the new C of G SD9 was put through its paces.  Then we went to lunch at Smokey Bones.
    After lunch we ran more trains.  With a two week layoff behind us, it sure was good to get our hands on a throttte again.

    This week's story features scary ghosts and strange happenings.  Read on if you are stout of heart and have no fear.

                                                                                                       The Ghost of Bedford Forrest

    The wooded area located just to the north of the Ovalix in the Midlands is known as Bedford Forrest.  It is named after the famous four-star Confederate General of the same name - and, yes, he spelled it with two r's.  Many of the inhabitants of Tahope County in 1950 have ancestors who fought on the side of the Confederacy during the Civil War.  Florida did not become a state until 1845, so it was new to the Union at the time the war formally started in 1861.  While Florida was never invaded by the Union Army, Key West remained occupied as a Union military installation and Ft. Myers was occupied by Union troops from before the war until its end.  The war did "touch" Florida through the loss of many Confederate soldiers, killed and wounded.  And many long time Florida natives see nothing wrong with honoring the memory of those who sacrificed their lives for the Confederacy.
    A wye is partially hidden in Bedford Forrest and, because the ground is covered with good old Florida sand, it is the home of small game such as gopher turtles, rabbits, and quail.  Occasionally, a Florida black bear wanders through the forest looking for easy prey and honey bees.  (Recently, the bears have started raiding the hives near the apiary located in South Tahope.)  The forest would be quite tranquil but for the noise the railroad makes.  The sound of locomotives and freight cars almost constantly traveling through the area reduces the wildlife activity.
    Some say the forest is haunted.  An eerie light has reportedly been seen on moonless nights and local residents avoid the area due to the supposed danger.  The origin of the ghost begins with the tragic death of a conductor, Hap Hatter, who lost his life on the south leg of the wye in 1934.  Hatter was decapitated while he was uncoupling a boxcar on a local freight.  His foot slipped and he fell on the track in front of a moving car.  The locals claim the mysterious light that appears at night is Hatter's lantern, which his ghost is carrying to locate his head.
    The light has been blamed on headlights from vehicles on the distant highway, but the light appeared well before the highway was constructed in 1947.  A complaint was recently made to the Tahope Police Department and Officer Poovey was assigned to investigate. 
    Officer Poovey approached the forest on a moonless night with fear and trepidation.  He crept through the thick woods with gun drawn and ready.  He saw a light glowing in the distance and advanced to learn its source.  The light came from close to ground level and showed the faint outline of a boxcar.  Poovey could hear two brakemen discussing the situation but it was too dark to see them.  He could tell that one voice came from ground level and the other came from atop of the boxcar.  When the brakey on the tops told the brakey on the ground to "throw the lantern up to me," Poovey could not understand what was said. 
    Suddenly, Poovey observed the light rapidly rising from the ground and making an arc above the boxcar before going out.  Poovey, who by this time was very frightened, turned and ran back to his patrol car as fast as his legs could carry him.
   The next morning, Poovey reported to the Chief of Police and explained what he saw the night before.  He said, "There's ghosts alright!  Last night I saw a boxcar spotted on the wye and heard the ghosts talking to one another.  One ghost was standing on the ground with a lantern and the other ghost was atop the box car.  The ghost on the ground jumped all the way to the top of the boxcar and put out the light.  That's when I turned tail for town.  Never been so scared in my life!"
    And the legend of the Ghost of Bedford Forrest goes on.
                                                                                                                     
(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-140919163017.jpeg)
                                                                                                                     

(http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-140919162751.jpeg) 

                         
 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on September 14, 2019, 05:12:24 PM
Judge,

Great, this is another reason even I don't walk the Bedford Forrest Wye at night. Just saying.

Tom  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: bparrish on September 14, 2019, 05:58:33 PM
Fun story ....


Thanx
Bob
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on September 14, 2019, 06:55:50 PM
Another great yarn Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on September 15, 2019, 08:20:58 AM
Enjoyed it Bill..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on September 15, 2019, 01:01:52 PM
I consider myself lucky to have never been on the Bedford Forrest Wye at night.  There is a lot more to this than meets the eye.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on September 21, 2019, 03:42:23 PM
Saturday Report - September 21, 2019
    The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours and began the meeting with a Coke and a diet Pepsi.  A box full of new items were received from various manufacturers, including several Budd passenger cars that will be assigned to our Southern passenger trains.  Additionally, a load of lumber (HO scale) and a number of little people were included.  The most important of the little people were the beekeepers, who will be placed next to the apiary as soon as it is moved into place. 
    The next item on the agenda was our continued efforts to classify and spot trains on the tracks in the Bottoms.  Last week we arranged our passenger fleet and this week the effort was on freight. 
    We received a number of new "bass speakers" from TCS.  The CEO has assigned the installation task for installation of two of the new speakers to Will Fixer's roundhouse foreman and we expect to be able to compare the quality with other, inferior, speakers next Saturday.
    Classifying freight trains gave us the opportunity to run several trains from the Bottoms to Summit and into the Midlands so, absent the usual Saturday morning gremlins, we had few mishaps and much revenue was generated for the A&S in the process.

    This week's story is one of success and sadness.  It was wonderful to live in Central Florida in 1950 and hear the lonesome whistles of ACL's Pacifics as they traveled through Orlando in the night.  But, all good things must come to an end - but wait!  The ACL steamers still pound the rails on the A&S and they have lasted years longer than the originals.  They are just a bit smaller.  Now for the story.

                                                                                                              Wayne Shoemaker

    Tahope County is sparsely populated, like many Florida counties in 1050.  In the winter there are a number of migrants who swell the population to nearly 10,000, but normally the population is much less than that.  For instance, the City of Tahope, the county seat, only has a population of 1504.  It's one of those southern counties where everybody knows everybody.
    Wayne Shoemaker is the son of Walter and Buttercup Shoemaker (Most of the wimmmin folk in Tahope are named after flowers or plants).  Wayne used to enjoy the summers because he could go barefoot and fish in the Tahhope River that runs south of town.  Wayne's dad is the manager of the local orange packing facility located near the banks of the River.   Wayne's mother is an English teacher at Tahope County High School. 
    One Saturday in June 1925, when Wayne was 10 years old, he wandered onto the yard at the A&S roundhouse and engine facility.  He had always been fascinated by the railroad, which was so much the lifeblood of his community, and he dreamed of one day becoming an engineer on a steam locomotive. 
    Anyway, Wayne walked along one of the lead tracks towards the roundhouse and stopped at the coaling tower.  There he saw A&S number 71 spotted under the coal chute.  The fireman pulled the chain to open the chute and a couple of tons of coal fell into the tender.  The fireman saw Wayne watching this performance and said, "Hi, there, young'n.  You like steam engines?"  To which Wayne answered, "Boy! Do I!"  "Well, then, climb up into the cab and I'll show you how she works." 
    Wayne climbed into the cab and the fireman, a local man named Mike Weaver (many of the inhabitants of Tahope have last names that reflect midieval occupations), pointed out all of the valves and gages on the backhead.  Then he let Wayne sit in the engineer's seat.
    About that time, the hogger climbed aboard and Mike asked him if Wayne could ride in the cab while number 71 switched the citrus plant.  Wayne was allowed to ride and he shoveled coal and blew the whistle, a three chimer.
    At the end of the day Wayne was convinced that life as a railroader was for him and he longed for the day he would sit in the engineer's seat in charge of his own freight train. 
    Wayne graduated from Tahope High School in 1933 and hired on with the Atlantic Coast Line as a brakeman.  He broke for that railroad until 1940 when he finally qualified as a fireman.  His name was written up on the extra board and he was called the next day to fie on a local freight.  He climbed into the cab of ACL's number 835, a USRA Mike, and began checking the boiler pressure and water level.  He was a little nervous, beins how this was his first day on the job and he knew some of the engineers had little patience with green firemen. 
    The hogger climbed up the ladder on the right side of the engine and extended his hand to Wayne.  He said, "Don't I know you?  Could you be Wayne Shoemaker, the little boy I gave a ride to back in 1925?  "Well, said Wayne, you must be Mike Weaver, the guy who was the fireman that day."  "Yep," said Mike, now grab that shovel  and bring the pressure up so we can highball out of here on time." 
    Wayne was finally promoted to engineer in 1953, but by that time, number 835 had been scrapped ane Wayne learned how to handle a freight train with a brace of F2's. 
    And I guess they call that progress. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on September 21, 2019, 03:55:45 PM
A nice feel good story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on September 21, 2019, 05:02:57 PM
Another great story, Judge.


Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Dennis Bourey on September 21, 2019, 07:06:17 PM
I agree Judge, Great story..........Dennis
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on September 22, 2019, 07:47:44 AM
Thanks for a great story Judge!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on September 22, 2019, 09:17:33 AM
These wonderful stories sure do add another layer of realism to the A&S.  Keep up the great work!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on September 22, 2019, 10:37:18 AM
It was a very sad day when steam engines were replaced by diesels, better for the bottom line, but no soul.....another good one Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on September 22, 2019, 11:33:55 AM
Wonderful, Wonderful.  Great Story Bill.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on September 27, 2019, 10:46:16 PM
I want to thank all of my loyal followers who visit my Saturday Reports each weekend.  I have a lot of fun coming up with the stories and I  feel like I am getting to really know some of the characters.  That is probably because some of them are modeled after people I have known, especially the criminal types.  Let me know how I'm doing.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Raymo on September 28, 2019, 07:19:35 AM
It's good that the A&S has some adult supervision to keep everyone inline!😀
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on September 28, 2019, 07:30:55 AM
I love the stories, but then I live them every Saturday.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on September 28, 2019, 12:45:33 PM
I love the stories, but then I live them every Saturday.

Lucky!!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on September 28, 2019, 01:14:06 PM
More great photos.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on September 28, 2019, 05:36:57 PM
September 28, 2019 Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report

    Problem with photos solved itself.  Go figure.

    The Board of Directors met this morning at 0830 and, after a Coke and a Diet Pepsi there was a a sad discussion about Bill Cutler's Pennsy being scheduled for dismantling.  Bill is a good friend and we wish him the best, but we will miss his layout.
    There was a discussion about the installation of the newly arrived TCS bass speakers.  We have installed one of them in an ACL E7A and cannot see an appreciable difference between it and the factory-installed speaker.  Tom is going to install another one in one of our PFM USRA Pacifics this week and we will give it a test next Saturday.
    We decided to run some locos that haven't had a recent move so we started out with a Southern Passenger train.  The E6 diesel is really duded up with a fancy paint scheme.  The E6A has an E6B unit but it is a non-functional-but-pleasing-consist-enhancer which is without a prime mover.  The consist had an REA car and nine Budd streamlined passenger cars in tow and it walked up the ovalix to the Midlands and then to Summit without even a hint of a problem.  Then it took "the big trip" back to the bottoms. 
                                                             
                                                                       (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-290919135619.jpeg)

    Next, we brought the Gulf Breeze Zepher up to Summit and ran it through its paces.  The Gulf Breeze Zepher is a complete train that was purchased from the CB&Q along with an ABA lash-up of F2 CB&Q diesels and an ABA lash-up of D&RGW F3's.  It travels from Jacksonville to New Orleans three times a week during the season and provides needed revenue for the A&S.

                                                                 (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-290919142114.jpeg)

                                                                 (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-290919141755.jpeg)

                                                                   These Photos were taken at Summit just after the Z exited the Ovalix.

    Lunch was at Smokey Bones as usual.
     The morning train run was a total success.  Not a single derail except for a few switches thrown the wrong way.  We need to get rid of that new brakeman, Newt Fisher. 

   This week's story involves a lesson on firing an old burning steam locomotive. 

                                                                                                            SANDING THE FLUES

    Oil burning locomotives like A&S Number 7, a Sierra type 2-6-6-2, are plagued with problems involving soot clogging up the boiler flues.  Clogged flues tend to reduce the boiler pressure and that is a fireman's nightmare.  The problem is solved through the process of sanding the flues.
    A sandbox containing the same kind of sand used in the sand dome is located on the front side of the tender next to the apron between the tender and the cab of the engine.  A small shovel is provided to facilitate the sanding operation by the fireman.
    When the engine is at track speed and working steam, a significant draft is created.  Every ten miles or so, the fireman inserts a scoop or two of sand through the "peephole" in the firebox door.  The draft sucks the sand into the flues and the soot is blown out the stack, along with a generous amount of black smoke and cinders. 
    Speaking of Number 7, one fine morning in the late summer, just as the oppressive heat and humidity of August in a Florida swamp began to lift, Uncle Henry O'Leary drew the pulpwood run to Piney Woods as the engineer on A&S Number 7.  His fireman that day was John Tanner, who had recently been promoted from being a brakeman and who had scant experience firing an oil-burning locomotive.  When John climbed into the cab, Uncle Henry asked him about his experience and suggested he get acquainted with the sandbox located on the floor in front of the tender.  "She'll need her flues sanded every ten miles or so," he said, and John said he understood. 
    Uncle Henry manhandled the reversing lever and set it in the back corner.  Then he cracked the throttle and Ole Number 7 slowly backed down the service track past the coaling tower, her cylinders making the uneven exhausts articulated engines make along with rod clank and escaping steam. 
    Number 7 coupled onto a caboose and proceeded on the mainline past the Sanlando Station and around Eaton's Curve and over the Great Divide, heading for Piney Woods.  On the way, Uncle Henry turned to his fireman and said, "Boy!  My teeth!"  John turned towards the engineer and saw he was holding his false teeth, covered with tobacco juice, in his outstretched hand.  "Wash them," he demanded.  John took the teeth and washed them with water from the water jug located on a shelf in the front of the tender.  Uncle Henry returned the teeth to his mouth and bit off a new chaw of tobacco.
    Soon, Number 7 approached Piney Woods and John took his shovel and inserted sand through the peephole in the firebox door to sand the flues.  Unfortunately, no one told him that it was a bad idea to sand the flues in a forest area.  The sand dislodged the soot from the flues and soot, cinders, and sparks belched out of the stack.  The sparks set several of the pine trees on fire.  Uncle Henry applied the air and the engine stopped.  John grabbed the water hose and squirted the fire with feed water from the tender, putting it out.  But the fire had done its work and evidence of the fire is still present in Piney Woods. (See Photos)  Lesson learned.

                                                                         (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-290919135855.jpeg)
                                   

                                                                             (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-290919140058.jpeg)

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on September 28, 2019, 07:30:56 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on September 29, 2019, 08:12:34 AM
Enjoyed this weeks installment Bill..... :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on September 29, 2019, 09:50:43 AM
 :) Another gem Bill.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on September 29, 2019, 12:39:19 PM
Great Story Bill. ;D ;D ;D ;D

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on September 29, 2019, 02:31:35 PM
Well, the photos are up.  I hope this problem, whatever it was, will not happen again. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on September 29, 2019, 02:50:28 PM
Judge,

Considering Tom's reputation with fire I'm a little surprised the damage wasn't more extensive.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on September 29, 2019, 04:45:42 PM
Jerry - We don't let him play with matches anymore and may restrict his access to X-acto knives. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on September 29, 2019, 06:59:03 PM
Another great story Judge!  When I visited the A&S this past summer with my son I missed seeing the burned forest!  Dang!  I'll have to make another trip down there to visit the A&S (and my son!) next year.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on September 29, 2019, 09:52:36 PM
Mark - You are always welcome. 

And thanks to all of you who visited this week's Saturday Report.  I appreciate your comments. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on October 05, 2019, 04:40:45 PM
Welcome to the October 5, 2019 edition of the Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report

Big Day today!  While we are sorry Bill Cutler decided to pack in model railroading, we are happy to report that a number of Chris's trees and Bills locomotives and rolling stock have been acquired by the A&S, some for sale and others to keep.  We spent most of the morning testing locomotives, many of which are equipped with WOW Sound.  Of course, all are Pennsy so why should A&S care to acquire them?  Well, The A&S and the Pennsy have a long and warm history with each other beginning in the early 1970s when a hobby shop named the Train Depot opened up on Colonial Drive in Orlando.  The owner, Dick DeWitt, was an avid Pennsy fan and Tom and I stayed friends with him even after he retired until he passed away in December 2006.  The A&S has several engines that belonged to Dick and a few items of rolling stock lettered for the Buckeye and Pennensula Railroad, which was the name of his railroad.

We were happy to receive Curt Webb and Bob Butts during the morning session and they accompanied us to Smokey Bones for lunch. 

There was additional testing after lunch with a lash-up of an FP7-F7B-F7A hauling 20 loaded Pennsy coal hoppers down the Ovalix to the Midlands.  Looking Good!

Today's story gives the readers an opportunity to ger reacquainted with Wilie McSlyme, whose friends call him Wormy.  You met Wormy some weeks ago when he and Shortstack got jailed for stealing food from the A&S Commissary. He's back, this time stealing wages from his time card. 

                                                                                                   Roundhouse Monkey Business

"Tater" Cartwright (main squeeze of Peaches Weaver - See pages 10-11) was recently promoted from roundhouse mechanic's helper to Assistant Roundhouse Foeman.  His new responsibilities included supervision of routine engine repairs, equipment maintenance, and safety enforcement within the roundhouse.

Of necessity, Tater had to hire on parttime help during the busy harvesting season in Central Florida which lasts from October until early summer.  The freight traffic from Florida to the North requires a lot of "extra" runs, especially when fruits, vegetables, and citrus are being harvested.  Extra runs of long trains of reefers or open "watermelon cars" crowd the rails on their way past Jacksonville to as far as New York or Boston. 

Scarce labor requires hiring marginal employees and sometimes Tater had to stoop so low as to hire out of the transitory residents of the Bottoms.  Such was the situation when the first cold snap (temperatures in the low 40s) occurred and the citrus crop ripened up a little early.  Tater advertised for part-time roundhouse help and hired a guy from the Bottoms who claimed his name to be Willie McSlyme, but his friends call him Wormy.  Now Worny had no references, although he claimed to have made "Inmate of the Month" at the Tahope County Jail.  Tater put him to work as a "wiper," whose duties were to wipe down the boilers of the engines brought in for repairs, polish their brass, and clean out the cabs. 

Wormy reported for work Monday morning ready to show off his wiping expertise.  He grabbed a box of waste and went to work on the nearest steam loco, a huge ACL 8000 series 4-8-4.  It usually took four wipers to wipe the boiler on these engines in a day, but Wormy wanted to prove his worth so he had the boiler wiped down before noon.  He went for beans at Sweaty Betty's hamburger joint and decided to take a short nap on company time.  There was no place in the roundhouse for him to hide, so he climbed up to the top of the boiler of the big engine.  He had seen the maintenance crew remove the hatch from the steam dome earlier in the day and, since the engine was cold, he decided to slip down into the boiler for his nap.

As luck would have it, shortly after Wormy drifted off to slumberland, the maintenance crew decided to refill the boiler and bring the engine up to steam.  A five-inch firehose was inserted into the boiler through the steam dome hatch and the water began flowing with gusto. 

The hose was directly over Wormy when the water started gushing into the boiler, drenching him.  There he was, sleeping on the job his first day at work and in such a fix.  If he did nothing, he would drown.  If he hollered for help, he'd get fired for sleeping on the job. 

But Wormy, who was not slow in the avoidance of consequences department, hollered for help and, when he was pulled out of the boiler, he produced a wad of wet waste he had used as a pillow during his nap, and bawled out the maintenance crew chief for disturbing him while he was wiping the inside of the boiler. 

Tater looked over the situation and allowed that since Wormy had wiped down the outside of the boiler before lunch, it made sense that he would wipe down the inside afterward.  Wormy got off with a warning to let the maintenance crew know the next time he wiped the inside of a boiler.

And that is how Wormy got the Roundhouse Worker of the Month Award to go with his other one.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on October 05, 2019, 05:16:17 PM
Amazing how slackers seem to come out on top.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on October 05, 2019, 05:45:25 PM
"Inmate of the Month"  Seriously, Judge?  I laughed out loud when I read that.  Maybe I could drop that idea into the suggestion box at the county jail.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on October 05, 2019, 07:07:44 PM
Never let a golden opportunity go to "waste".
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on October 06, 2019, 08:55:27 AM
Good one Bill.....sounds like I missed a fun day at the A&S.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on October 06, 2019, 01:06:01 PM
I look forward to your stories every Saturday. Better than reading the newspaper. Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on October 06, 2019, 01:07:06 PM
Holy Huckleberry I was able to post!

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on October 06, 2019, 04:19:39 PM
Good one Bill.....sounds like I missed a fun day at the A&S.  :)


Greg,

Yepper, everyday here is a fun day.

Tom   ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on October 12, 2019, 10:47:05 AM
Saturday Report - October 12, 2019

There is no official Saturday Report today because it is the monthly treck to Mt. Dora for the Babe to get her hair done.  Meanwhile, the A&S CEO will be visiting Bill Cutler in Tavares and taking custody of the remains of what is left of Bill Cutler's Pennsy layout.  Some of these items will no doubt find their way to E-Bay and others will probably end up being absorbed by the Atlantic & Southern. 

This week's story involves aspects of railroad safety.  Railroaders who take short cuts risk injury and there are no minor injuries on the railroad.

                                                                                                      NEVER TURN YOUR BACK

Regular readers of this Saturday Report will remember that Newt Fisher did not do well as a fireman and was reassigned as a brakeman. 

One windy night in early fall, Newt was brakeing in the Sanlando Transfer Yard.  The yard switcher, Number 1150 (a USRA 0-6-0) was making up the morning local, which usually consisted of 12 to 14 cars, two of which were tank cars from the Pure Oil storage facility.  These cars were delivered to the diesel facility at Summit for refueling diesels spotted there for repairs.


                                                                  (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-121019112006.jpeg)

The switcher had the two tankers coupled to the front coupler, and the engineer, "Fatso" Johnson, was about to make a "flying switch."  This maneuver required two brakemen.  One brakeman had to open the switch to an adjacent track while the other brakeman positioned himself on the footboards at the front of the engine so he could "pull the pin" on the front coupler.  The engine proceeded in reverse towards the open switch and the front brakeman uncoupled the tankers from the engine.  Their momentum carried them slowly down the track and the engine traveled through the open switch.  The brakeman closed the switch and the tankers continued to roll towards the other cars assembled at the end of the track.  This tricky maneuver was not at all unusual in 1950, but bad timing could result in derailments or injuries and most railroads prohibit it today, although some crews still take the risk.

Newt was too green to be part of the flying switch maneuver so he was posted at the end of the yard track in front of the other assembled cars.  His job was to connect the angle cocks on the air hoses once the tankers coupled to the other cars.

Now, any experienced railroader will tell you one of the rules when switching in a freight yard is to never turn your back on moving cars.  Freight cars make a lot of noise when they are coupled to a locomotive.  But cars that are coasting are silent as a mouse.   One wheel, just one wheel, on a freight car weighs nearly 100 pounds.  Get caught under one of those and you can imagine what it would do to your bones. 

Newt was posted at the end of the track standing in front of a boxcar.  He was busy adjusting the knuckle on the boxcar coupler and did not hear the tank cars coasting towards him.  He felt a change in the air as the tankers came within a foot or two from him and he managed to jump out of the way as the tankers slammed into the boxcar.  Another split second and he would have become part of those two cars. 

Newt, who had all of the blood drained from his face, sat down to check and see if he was really alright.   The other brakemen approached him and hollered, "Whatcha sittin' down fer, Newt?" Newt replied, "Sometimes I sits and thinks and other times I just sits.  Right now I'm jus' sittin'."

The incident was never reported.  After all, no one was hurt and no railroad property was damaged.  But Newt learned a lesson he would not forget.


Although the "Flying swtich" maneuver is generally prohibited today, it looks like Conrail didn't get the word.  The link below is an example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AB7L1ytf47g
 

 

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on October 12, 2019, 05:27:18 PM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Dennis Bourey on October 12, 2019, 07:01:58 PM
Thank you Judge..........Dennis
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on October 13, 2019, 12:59:57 AM
Great Story Bill.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on October 13, 2019, 10:36:58 AM
Enjoyed this one Bill..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on October 19, 2019, 04:48:14 PM
ATLANTIC & SOUTHERN  Saturday Report October 19, 2019

    It was a rainy Saturday here in Central Florida due to a tropical storm plowing through the panhandle and dumping water in abundance on the Big Bend.  We got a steady rain for several hours this far south of the main storm and our temperature stayed at a comfortable but muggy 73 degrees most of the morning. 
    The Bored Directors of the A&S convened their Saturday meeting a little early this morning and spent some time inventorying new equipment and planning the day.  We decided to add a couple of cars to the Pennsy Broadway Limited to make it prototypical so the train stretched 15 cars behind 3 E7 diesel units.  That train is almost too long for the railroad but it is fun watching it.  There is a storage track on the East side of the Bottoms that is long enough for the train to be spotted when it is not needed.  We were in the Pennsy mood so we also ran a 21-car coal hopper freight with three Pennsy F2's providing the power. 
    After the Pennsy trains returned to the north, we ran the Central of Georgia SD9 with a freight train and switched power to C of G E7's.
    Lunch at Smokey Bones, as usual.
   After lunch, we moved the ACL Champion to the Bottoms to free up some space. 
    All-in-all, it was a really fun Saturday.

    This week's story is a description of the railroads represented on the A&S and an explanation of why some seemingly out-of-place railroads are represented. 
    First, the readers should know that the A&S was originally a "deep South" railroad limited to famous Florida flags like the ACL, Southern, SAL, and FEC.  However,  these railroads had an ownership interest in other "mostly southern" railroads like the L&N, N.C.& St. L, C&O, C of G, Clinchfield, and a few others.  These roads are represented due to their family relationship with the ACL and the Southern.
    The Pennsy and the roads that powered the California Zephyr are represented in a whimsical way because, as to the Zephyr, we liked it, and as to the Pennsy, we had a long relationship with a devoted Pennsy fan who owned Orlando's best RR hobby shop for many years.  When he passes away in 2006, we acquired a number of Pennsy steamers and rolling stock.  We decided the A&S is our railroad and if we want to run Pennsy trains now and then for fun well, it is our railroad.
   
                                                                                    THE RAILROADS ON THE ATLANTIC & SOUTHERN
    The Atlantic & Southern System (ASS) hosts the Atlantic Coast Line (ACL), Seaboard Air Line (SAL) and Southern Ry, all of which have trackage rights over the line.  The Louisville & Nashville, N. C. & St. L, Chesapeake & Ohio and Central of Georgia (C of G) have passenger and freight agreements with either the ACL or the Southern and provide relief during peak seasons as needed. 
    The Illinois Central's City of Miami passenger train occasionally passes through on its way from Chicago to Miami twice a week,  The "City" is operated by a number of railroads, including the ACL and the FEC and each road contributes to the consist.   The "City" usually runs from Jacksonville to Miami on FEC tracks but a section follows ACL trackage through Tahope County to Orlando and down to Miami.  Usually, a sleeper is set out at Sanlando for transfer to Tampa by way of Kissimmee, Holopaw, Hachnehaw, Yehaw Junction, and Thonotosassa by way of ACL's  East Coast Champion. 
    The A&S owns a few steam locomotives outright and leases or "borrows" others.  There are no plans to dieselize the A&S locomotive fleet. 
    The A&S contracts with the larger roads to provide maintenance on locomotives and has a modern roundhouse and two diesel repair facilities to provide that service. 
    The A&S provides local freight and passenger service in the rural Tahope County area.
    Recently, the Board of Directors saw the need for a westward connection, so it leased a section of the California Zephyr, including Burlington and Rio Grande F units.  This train provides weekly service out of Jacksonville to New Orleans and has been named the Gulf Breeze section of the Pensacola Zephyr.  This train is a major revenue producer for the railroad.
    The A&S and the environs of Tahope County have regular need for coal, both for fuel for steam locomotives and for electric power.  Also, coal is vital for heating during the three days each winter when the temperature drops below 50 degrees.  The Pennsylvania Railroad happily provides the motive power for a weekly coal train in exchange for free passes over the A&S for Pennsy brass hats.
    In addition to coal trains, the Pennsy's Broadway Limited swings south occasionally to service Florida bound travelers and it makes stops at Jacksonville and Sanlando when scheduled. 
    President Langford gave the Pennsy president several free passes to travel over the A&S and asked him to reciprocate with free passes over the Pennsy.  When he suggested this arrangement, the Pennsy president wondered how that would be fair, considering the Pennsy had over 10,000 miles of track and the A&S is a local line located in a Central Florida Swamp.  He was won over when President Langford said, "Your railroad may be a mite longer than mine, but mine is just as wide."
    The Pennsy has excess still serviceable steam locomotives and has agreed to loan a number of them to the A&S .  These locomotives were scheduled for the scrap heap due to the Pennsy dieselization program and the A&S needs additional motive power during the busy winter season.  Recently, the A&S made lease arrangements with the Pennsy and acquired several Pennsy diesel locomotives.  These units will be used to augment the busy winter traffic but will not replace steam locomotive power on the A&S.
 
                                                                      (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-191019163500.jpeg)
                                               Recently acquired C of G E7's in freight duty awaiting assignment to the Atlanta-to-Savanna Nancy Hanks.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on October 19, 2019, 06:47:42 PM
Great history.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on October 20, 2019, 09:02:03 AM
Sounds reasonable to me..... ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on October 20, 2019, 09:23:27 AM
Great story behind a well run railroad.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on October 20, 2019, 09:51:48 AM
There have even been reported sightings of a Reading T1 and Jersey Central HH660 on the A&S.  But the boys who reported that may have been sipping some shine at the time so the sightings are considered unconfirmed.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Bruce Oberleitner on October 20, 2019, 10:07:58 AM
I love the reports.  Keep em coming Judge!

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on October 20, 2019, 12:34:28 PM
There have even been reported sightings of a Reading T1 and Jersey Central HH660 on the A&S.  But the boys who reported that may have been sipping some shine at the time so the sightings are considered unconfirmed.   ;)

Not entirely implausible.'
The management of the A&S has demonstrated keen judgement in most other areas: the appearance of these two titans is obviously not outside the realm of possibility.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Dennis Bourey on October 20, 2019, 12:37:39 PM
Yet another!!!!!!!!! Thanks Judge......Dennis
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on October 20, 2019, 10:13:03 PM
Thank all of you for your kind comments.  A description of Atlantic & Southern (at least of the Midlands) will follow one Saturday after the Tahope Branch Line is completed.

Meanwhile, there will be some rats in the home office.  Stay tuned.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on October 21, 2019, 06:38:57 AM
Great historical information on the ASS Bill.  Shows why the RR has been profitable all these years!  And heck, like you said, it's your railroad and can operate it as you see fit.  Looking forward to the next one.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on October 26, 2019, 03:34:50 PM
AAtlantic & Southern Saturday Report - October 26, 2019

The crew assembled promptly at 0830 hours to marvel at the A&S's newly delivered Southern E8A units by Proto 2000.  They are beauties and that is the good news.  The bad news is they come with LOC Sound - I don't know how you pronounce that, but I really don't care.  The decoders had problems right out of the box and they sound terrible at best.  Best advertisement for TCS WOW Sound your reporter has seen.

                                                                    (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-261019152718.jpeg)

We had trouble early on with a mysterious "short" that bugged us on the Summit.  After much push and pull, including changing out a Digitrax booster, we found the culprit to be an errant Pennsy steam locomotive. Once removed from the track all went well.  In fact, changing out the booster solved other problems.

Greg DeMayo arrived in time for lunch at Smokey Bones.

After lunch we ran the Broadway Limited down from Summit to the Midlands with little difficulty except for an open switch.  The Cof G E7's delivered freight to the Sanlando yard and we called it a day. 

Today's story is a sad tale of a  fallen woman named Magnolia (Maggie) Hussy (Most of the "wimmin" in Tahope are named after flowers or plants.)  A pathetic soul who we will no doubt meet again another Saturday.

                                                                                                         The Tale of a Fallen Woman

After having served his sentence for theft of A&S Commissary meat products (See p. 19 - Tahope Code Talkers) Wormy returned to the Bottoms to resume his normal life, namely plotting another criminal enterprise.  This time it was to be an inside job. 

Wormy gathered several of his fellow vagabonds together around the fire heating the Mulligan Stew one evening and discussed his plan.  The men were joined with a new addition to the Bottoms, a lass of questionable habits and reputation, although not without physical charms, named Magnolia (Maggie) Hussy.  Maggie was expelled from Tahope County High School in 1946 for promiscuous activity.  Now she calls an abandoned boxcar sidetracked on the east side of the Bottoms her home and lives off of what she can catch in the river.  As Wormy later described her, "She looks pretty darn good after a bath in the river and the fish smell is an improvement." 

Wormy explained his plan, which required an accomplice to infiltrate into the A&S Accounting and Disbursement Office with the object of relieving the management of some cash revenue. 

"I need somebody who knows money and will work with me cheap," said Wormy.  Maggie replied, "I'm cheap."  And a partnership was born. 

Maggie made an application to the A&S Financial Office as a bookkeeper.  She told Wormy, "I will use my considerable charms, of which I have many, to wiggle my way into the highest level of financial management."  Or she said something like that.

The A&S Financial Officer, Alex Hamilton, was so impressed with Maggie's "enthusiasm" that he hired her as a trainee bookkeeper in spite of her lack of experience.  Normally, he did not cotton to attractive, inexpensive women, but Maggie was exceptional and he figured his male employees would keep their distance because of the odor. 

Not long after Maggie went to work, little amounts of cash started missing because Wormy and Maggie were making "dry runs" to get their plan down to perfection.  Unbeknownst to our would-be white collar criminals, Hamilton got wind of the plan due to the missing petty cash. 

One day the pay car arrived at the yard at Summit with the payroll from the Tahope State Bank and the thieves put their plan into action.  Wormy, disguised as an engineer from Summit, came into the office with a requisition form to collect the payroll.  Maggie counted out $9,500.00 and put it into Wormy's pay satchel.  She did not know the serial numbers on the bills had been recorded. 

Wormy scampered to the Trackside Tavern with his share of the loot to celebrate his good fortune and paid for his beer with a $50.00 bill that he got from the heist.  The bartender, Clovis Butcher, thought it suspicious for Wormy to have so large a bill so he called the Tahope Police Department as a precaution.  Officer Poovey responded to the call and, after looking at the serial number on the bill, arrested Wormy for the theft.  Further investigation led to the discovery of Maggie, who was also arrested. 

Wormy hired Marvin Bello to represent him, paying his fee with another one of the $50.00 bills.  Bello, who never lost a case, convinced the prosecutor that the caper was all Maggie's fault and Wormy was only the bag man.  The story was credible because Maggie seemed to be the smarter of the two.  Wormy testified against Maggie at the trial and the jury convicted her of embezzlement.  Judge Elvin P. Thomas reviewed the evidence and, before imposing sentence, lectured Maggie for stealing money from the Atlantic & Southern Railroad that belonged to its employees.  He also pointed out that a successful thief never steals more than she can pay back.  He sentenced her to a year and a day in prison.  Wormy got off with 60 days in jail persuant to his plea bargin. 

Justice is meted out fairly in Tahope County, just like everywhere else.

                                                                                                           The Rest of the Story

The Florida Supreme Court considered Maggie's case and reversed her conviction some nine months after she entered prison.  She returned to the Bottoms and her normal life of living off of what she can catch from the Tahope Rvier.  Sweaty Betty cooks what she catches for a share of the turtles, fish and crabs.



                                                                                                 

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on October 26, 2019, 03:45:35 PM
Great yarn Bill.....a grand day was had by all on the ole' A&S..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on October 26, 2019, 04:13:07 PM
That has got to be true story.  "Only in Florida"

Great report Bill.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on October 26, 2019, 07:49:57 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on October 29, 2019, 09:59:37 PM
NOTICE!  THERE WILL BE NO SATURDAY REPORT ON NOVEMBER 2, 2019.  YOUR REPORTER IS TAKING A LONG WEEKEND AT A REUNION WITH HIS OLD MILITARY SCHOOL BUDDIES. 

THE JUDGE
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on October 30, 2019, 08:32:45 AM
We'll notify the MPs to Be On the Look Out!


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on October 30, 2019, 10:03:23 AM
Have fun Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on October 30, 2019, 02:31:48 PM
I will bet there will be some great stories told there.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on November 08, 2019, 02:38:14 PM
  Saturday Report - November 9, 2019.
  The A&S team management Board met precisely at 0830 hours to discuss matters of major importance.  First on the agenda was the correct name of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad, which has sometimes been referred to as the Atlantic & Southern System (ASS).  This has caused needless confusion.  While the A&S has some interest in other railroads, it has no current ownership interest in any other than the A&S.  Mergers and acquisitions are at least two decades in the future from 1950 and so the A&S cannot be called a "system," at least not at the present.  There is little chance the A&S will ever gobble up railroads like the ACL but, like an ant on an elephant's butt, we can dream.
  Curt Webb arrived on the scene around 10:00.  It is always good to have a visitor who actually contributes to the morning session and Curt "knows stuff" about the  Pennsy.  Since we are awash (Curt knows that's a Navy term) with Pennsy locomotives and rolling stock, his expertise was helpful.  Besides, he's an all 'round good guy.
  The new bridge over the Tahope River is complete and awaiting final touches.  It really makes the scene more interesting. 
  After the meeting, we inspected the new buildings Eric built and marveled at their artistic construction.  Then we took stock of our storage facility at the Bottoms and realized we could rearrange things to accomodate the 19 car Broadway Limited.  Several trains were moved to better use the space and we were satisfied with the new arrangements. 
  Next we ran a 20 car train of loaded coal hoppers, powered by ACL 8000, a Russian Decapod.  The little engine pulled the train without effort on level track and we ran it down the Ovalix to Ths Midlands.  Just before exiting the Ovalix, there was a slight detour that caused the train to have to retrace its path in reverse.  Out of curiosity, we decided to let it back up into the Ovalix to see how far it would go before the wheels slipped.  To our surprise, the engine backed up the Ovalix with ease.  Must be the extra weight installed when it was painted over 10 years ago. 
  We inspected some of the "bone yard" at Summit, which has a number of Pennsy steamers awaiting disposition and then we went to lunch at smokey Bones.
  After lunch we ran a Pennsy passenger train and a C of G freight.  Then we called it a day.

  The idea for this week's story came from an 1893 edition of Harper's Weekly Magazine.  It involves a conversation between a Pullman Porter and a nervous female passenger who has never ridden on a train before.  I have shortened the story considerably, but I have quoted some of the conversation that took place, including the Porter's dialect.  This is the way some people talked in 1050, or earlier, I know because I have heard them, and some people still do.  I think the Porter was from "Jaw-ja."  Probably Savannah.

                                                                                                                  The Big Trip 

  Traveling by rail in 1950 was not nearly as dangerous as before the turn of the century.  Wooden coaches were death traps if they caught fire or collided with another train due to a phenomenon known as telescoping.  It was not unusual for train wrecks to occur due to primitive hand brakes and link-and-pin couplers.  Steel coaches with modern appliances did a lot to make travel safer and train wrecks became a rare occurrence.
  One fine fall day in November 1950, the ACL Champion left on time from Tahope and carried one of Tahope's "high society" women in one of its 14 section Pullmans.  Rose Forrester was the wife of Tahope State Bank President, J. Pierpont Forrester, and she was on her way for a shopping spree in Manhatten.  This was Rose's first train trip and she was a little nervous about traveling overnight at speeds in excess of a mile a minute. 
  As evening approached, Rose spoke with the Porter and asked him to make up her lower berth so she could try to go to sleep. 
  The Porter, trying to be helpful, asked, "Beg yo', pardon ma'am, how does yo' like yo' head?" 
  "Mercy me," thought Rose, "what on earth could he possibly mean?" 
  "Do yo' want yo' feet to'd the enjyne?  Dat's de safes' way ebery time."
  "Oh dear, now I'm scared," said Rose.  Do I need to worry about a train wreck? I'll never get to sleep on this train.  I'll just sit up on this seat and wait until morning." 
  "Now don't feel that way Miz, " said the Porter.  "Havin yo' feet to'd the enjyne - well dar you is.  But if yo're sleepin' wid yo' head to'ds de enjyne, den when dis yer train smashes into some other train, yo' is flung right again yo' head an' yo' heck is broke just like it wuz straw." 
  "Mercy me," said Rose, "Are we going to smash into some other - - - "
  "No ma'am, I didn't say we's goin' to.  All I say is it's best to be prepared.  I've been running on the Champ fo' twenty-two year an' I've seen eleven kerlisions, and every time de folks what's killed is de folks which gets chucked agin their heads.  Only last week there was an accident in Osceola County, a stout lady like you, she - - "
  But the Porter didn't bother to finish his explanation because at that moment Rose Forrester fainted dead away.
 
                                                                                    (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-081119144507.jpeg)

                                                                                      The Porter and Rose Forrester

                                                                                                       THE REST OF THE STORY

  Please refer to the October 26 Saturday Report on Pg. 28 entitled A Tale of a Fallen Woman.  There has been some local enthusiasm to learn more about Magnnolia (Maggie) Hussy.  Careful research has revealed a short video of her fishing in the Tahope River just before she entered high school at age 14.  More current photographs have not been discovered, but you can tell she was raised in Tahope by her accent.  Her brother took the video and her cousin, Ray, watched the action.  Everyone in her family has a pick-up truck with Confederate license plates on the front.  Turn up the volume so you can hear the dialog.

                                                                                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8puOw0Pqb4
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on November 08, 2019, 04:27:50 PM
For some reason, I'm expecting this will be part of tomorrow's story, too: 
(https://img-aws.ehowcdn.com/400x400/ds-img.studiod.com/West_Point_Cadet_walking_the__1.jpg)


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on November 09, 2019, 04:43:14 PM
Sorry, Dave, I'll have to work in my military career some other time.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on November 09, 2019, 05:05:50 PM
Judge, you didn't have to do tours?  I think I did once (at Norwich University.) 


I figured someone would get "written up" when you were out with your classmates.

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on November 10, 2019, 10:22:27 AM
Good one Bill.....ole' Maggie was one heck of  fisherman.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on November 10, 2019, 11:40:12 AM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on November 10, 2019, 12:27:02 PM
That was quite the Video Bill.  Sure looked like it was in the river at Tahope.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on November 11, 2019, 07:51:39 AM
"Gas on it girl, gas on it"

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on November 11, 2019, 08:38:00 AM
Great report and story Judge.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on November 11, 2019, 01:16:43 PM
Hi All:

I agree with everyone. Hope you enjoyed the reunion Judge.


Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on November 11, 2019, 03:15:08 PM
Curt, Dave, Greg, Jim, John, Karl, Tom, et al. 

Thank you for your kind words.

                                                                                                         Maggie Husssy Update

Maggie tried out for the cheerleader squad at Tahopee County High School in 1946 when she was in the 11th grade, but the local PTA told her mother to withdraw her name because of promiscuous behavior.  She dropped out at the end of the year and drifted towards The Bottoms where she found an abandoned boxcar for shelter.  One thing led to another and she decorated it with stuff she found around the river.  Soon the place was home.  One of her many "friends" cut a hole in the floor for her use and that worked out okay except for the flies.   A large cardboard box and an orange crate completed her furniture ensemble and a packing crate became a closet for her modest wardrobe.  She borrowed an Army surplus air mattress from a hobo who moved on without it and that served for a bed.

Maggie returned to her boxcar after her release from Lowell Correctional Facility for Women and dreamed of bigger things.  Hopefully, she will get a better boyfriend.   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on November 16, 2019, 10:43:27 AM
November 16, 2019 Saturday Report

  There is no formal Saturday Report today because it is the Babe's monthly appointment day to travel to Mount Dora.

  HOWEVER, there is a story.  It is one of courage and daring by an unlikely hero whom we have all gotten to know over the last few months.

                                                                                                       RUNAWAY ON THE OVALIX
                                                                                                                           OR
                                                                                                   HOW SHORTSTACK GOT PROMOTED

  Sometimes railroad tracks get slick with ice.  The humidity and temperature have to be just right.  When they align just so, ice forms on the rails.  This is rare in Central Florida, but it is not unheard of. 
  Ice poses a danger to heavy trains, especially on a downgrade.  Unless the sander is operating and Mr. Westinghouse's invention is providing plenty of air, the drivers on steam locomotives tend to slide out of control.
  One chilly November morning, Shortstack arrived at the yard at Summit to begin his chores, sweeping up the floor of the yard office. 
  Meanwhile, engineer "Patti" Miller was at the ready track raising steam in ACL's Russian decapod, number 8000, for a run down to the Midlands with a load of 21 hoppers, all of which were full of coal.  The steamer would never have been loaded with so many hoppers if the trip was upgrade on the Ovalix, but 8000 was rated to make the downgrade without difficulty so long as a capable crew was handling the engine.

                                                                                                   (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-161119104135.jpeg)


  Once the dispatcher gave the go-ahead, 8000 took up slack and started the trip to the Ovalix.
  Shortstack finished his chores in the yard office prior to 8000's departure and decided to hitch a ride to the Midlands in the caboose, along with the conductor and the hind shack.
  As the little decapod started downgrade, Miller noticed ice on the rails and a look of concern crossed his face.  Standard procedure handling an icy downgrade involved sanding the rails and cautiously applying the air to maintain a slow descent of 5 to 10 miles per hour.
  MIller turned on the sander as the engine began to increase speed and then applied the air, seeking about a 10% reduction.  NO RESPONSE!  MIller moved the airbrake handle back and forth, but no luck.  Now 8000 was sliding down the track on the slick rails and picking up speed.  Train would soon exceed the 25 mph speed limit on the Ovalix and be running out of control.
  Miller called for more steam and his fireman responded with several shovels full of coal into the firebox.  Miller tried to set the reverse lever into the back corner, hoping between the sand and the rotating drivers, the train would get under control.  That might have worked on an 1870 ten-wheeler, but not on a Russian decapod.  Since all else seemed to have failed, Miller decided to make some noise to warn of the impending danger of a runaway train.  So, Miller filled the Ovalix with short whistle blasts from 800's three chime whistle, signaling an emergency.
  Shortstack, who never missed an opportunity for a little shut-eye on company time, was napping in the caboose when Miller began to whistle.  He decided it would be better to face the danger head-on instead of waiting for it in the caboose, so he climbed over the coal hoppers heading for the engine.  The train picked up speed and was approaching "Greg Speed" as Shortstack made his way towards the engine. 
  When he reached the car coupled behind the tender, Shortstack, who had some limited experience railroading, noticed the angle cock connecting the air hose between the tender and the first hopper had been disconnected.  He climbed down the ladder from the top of the hopper to the coupler, which was no mean feat, because the cars were now lurching to and fro and threatening to derail.
  Shortstack reached down and recoupled the hoses.  Then he climbed over the coal pile in the tender and told Miller to try the air.  Miller waited a few seconds to give the air time to build up and then applied a standard reduction.  To the crew's delight, the air began to hold and the train slowed.  By the time it reached the Midlands, it was under control. 
  The Superintendent boarded the train at Sanlando and demanded an explanation of the incident.  He also wanted to know why the likes of Shortstack was in the cab.  Miller explained the situation and suggested the train had been sabotaged by angle cocking hobos who were refused a ride down the Ovalix. 
  "Well, Shortstack," said the Superintendent, "you've earned a heap of thanks from the Atlantic & Southern Railroad and in appreciation, I am promoting you to brakeman.  Report to the roundhouse and get your name on the extra board.
  Needless to say, Shortstack was thrilled with his newfound status.  Imagine, a shiftless skonk like Shortstack getting promoted from sweeper to brakeman.  He began making plans to move out of the Bottoms and maybe even getting a girlfriend.  Anticipating Travis Tritt by forty years, Shortstack composed a poem that later became the basis for a country and western hit, the first line of which went, "A woman warm and willin', that's what I'm lookin' for, cause the whiskey I've been drankin' ain't workin' anymore."
  But the story of Shortstack's girlfriend will have to wait for another day.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on November 16, 2019, 01:24:44 PM
Now that is a real funny story.

Jim (no relation to "Patti") Miller
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on November 16, 2019, 01:31:38 PM
Hope Shortstack didn't take on any airs with his promotion.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on November 16, 2019, 02:07:44 PM
Great job Shortstack.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on November 17, 2019, 11:07:12 AM
Another terrific story and glad to hear Shortstack was promoted.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on November 17, 2019, 11:21:20 AM
Loved it Bill..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on November 23, 2019, 03:44:35 PM
Atlantic & Southern Railroad Saturday Report - November 23, 2019  Temperature in Central Florida - Sunny and mid-80's.  Sorry about that.

The Directors of the A&S met promptly at 0830 hours.  Items of discussion included the purchase and installation of the CEO's new computer and disposition of Pennsy equipment that has been deposited on A&S property for sale or other disposition.  Surplus Pennsy coal hoppers were the focus of the discussion.  A number of them will be made available for other roads in the near future.

The Pennsy Sharks powered a coal train from the Bottoms up the Ovalix to the Midlands and then to Summit.  The A-B-A lash-up had no trouble traveling from the Bottoms to the Midlands and then to Summit with 29 coal hoppers and a caboose.  The Baldwin prime movers really sound realistic with WOW sound, although the "B" unit is an unpowered non-functional, but pleasing, consist enhancer.

Greg Demayo arrived around 10:30 and he ran his Pennsy H10 Consolidation until we departed for Smokey Bones for lunch. The H10 was coupled to the 29 car coal train and it pulled it with ease on the Summit level track.  Many have objections to the "rubber tire" on these engines but we are here as witnesses to say they really do the job. 

After lunch, your reporter ran a Pennsy passenger train, powered by three F2's and Greg ran his H10 as fast as it would run.  True GREG SPEED.  He claimed he was breaking the engine in.  We will see if he runs the engine at a slower speed next time.  The H10's were luggers and not speedsters but that did not matter to Greg.

This week's story is of a discontented Pullman passenger who was probably a regular on the City of Miami.  No one can blame him for being upset.  But to whom do you complain?  Pullman?  Illinois Central?  ACL? Florida East Coast?  NC&StL? C&EI?  All of them have a piece of "The City."



                                                                                                        PUT ME OFF AT SANLANDO

The City of Maimi is the Chicago to Miami streamliner that comes through Tahope County three days a week. 

One day in November, the northbound City departed Miami on time, fully loaded with passengers.  One of the passengers decided to take a nap in his comfortable coach and asked the porter to awaken him when the train reached Sanlando.  The porter agreed and assured him he would be awakened in time to get off the train.

h next thing the passenger knew, the train was backing into the station in Jacksonville.  The passenger became visibly upset and began cursing and hollering, demanding he get his hands on the porter, who had gotten wind of the ruckus and had wisely hidden behind a post in the train station. 

While the passenger was demanding to see a railroad representative so he could file a formal complaint, a brakeman walked over to the porter and asked, "What's the matter with that passenger?  He's running around and hollering to beat all!"  The Porter peered around the post and replied, "Yeh, but that ain't nuthin' compared to the man I put off in Sanlando."

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on November 23, 2019, 04:01:58 PM
The H-10 does need breaking in.....that's  my story and I'm sticking to it! Fun story Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on November 23, 2019, 04:04:43 PM
😂 That's great Bill. Sorry to have missed the Pennsy fest today.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on November 23, 2019, 04:32:04 PM
My Atlantic and Southern RR is going to get a bad reputation if all these unsavory peeps keep showing up. Meaning the story peeps Greg, not you!

Just saying.


Tom   ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on November 23, 2019, 05:13:58 PM
My Atlantic and Southern RR is going to get a bad reputation if all these unsavory peeps keep showing up. Meaning the story peeps Greg, not you!

Just saying.


Tom   ;D
It never crossed my mind that you were referring to me..... :o ??? ::) :) ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on November 23, 2019, 10:51:25 PM
Both of those passengers better grab a wishbone on Thursday and hope for a positive outcome.
The porter? As we used to say in the brokerage business "$*it happens".
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on November 24, 2019, 09:37:46 AM
Another fine story Bill!   ;D   Sorry I couldn't make it down yesterday.  For some reason my Saturday's have been getting spoken for recently.   :'(
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on November 26, 2019, 06:11:48 AM
Great report Bill!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on November 30, 2019, 03:52:26 PM
Saturday Report - November 30, 2019.  Sunny day, not a cloud in the sky, temperature was 69 early this morning and now it is 83.  Sorry about that.

    The Board of Directors met on time this morning at 0830 hours.  The main topic was a discussion about thinning out or locomotive roster and rolling stock roster - both of which are way out of date - Surly none of my readers would have out of date rosters. . . We are going to spend a Saturday or two (after the first of the year) updating the rosters and, meanwhile, the CEO is going to focus on moving some equipment on Ebay. 
    We decided to run some Southern equipment this morning and pulled two green, white and gold E7's out of the storage drawer.  These beauties were assigned to a 25 car plus caboose mixed freight leaving Sanlando for Summit.  The E7's pulled the train without difficulty and after a thorough tour of the Midlands, we proceeded up the Ovalix to Summit.  No problem there and your reporter got an opportunity to use the manual setting to notch up the prime movers during the climb.  Loads of fun.
    About 10:00 a.m. we adjourned for a trip to the hospital to see our friend Jim Miller, who is recovering from open heart by-pass surgery.  He is recovering as expected and should be shipped to a rehab facility next Tuesday.  Better him than me so they say.
    After our visit, we headed for Smokey Bones for lunch.  The place was deserted except for us but others arrived after 12:00.
    Upon return from lunch, we broke the 25 car freight in two and ran two trains around Summit.  The 4-8-2, ACL 1401, was fired up and proptly blew a decoder.  These things happen with the older run of TCS WOW Sound decoders.  TCS replaces blown decoders with new, updated versions at no charge so 1401 will be in the ruondhouse for repairs for awhile.


                                                                                 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQhNAv2NxAs

                                                                             Southern RR E7's entering Piney Woods with a short freight train


    This week's story is one involving the A&S track gang.  Working on the railroad in the '50's was back breaking work and, like today, it seemed to attract immigrants who were willing to do it.  A lot of these men were Irish and came to Central Florida from places like Boston, New York, and Chicago.  A number of these men found their way to the A&S railroad.
                                                                                       

                                                                                                          THE SECTION FOREMAN

    The Atlantic & Southern has a section foreman named O'Clannahan.  He is one of those old-time section foremen who knew how to get a day's work out of his men  without being a bully or a loundmouth.  Everybody on the road knew and respected him. 
    On day in late November, with the sun shining and not a cloud in the sky, O'Clannahan was walking along a section where track was being replaced and noticed a member of his gang relaxing under an oak tree fast asleep.  Eyeing the man with a smile, he said, " Slape on, ye idle wage skimmer, slape on.  So long as ye slape ye've got a job, but when ye wake up, ye're out of wurrk."
    Later that day, the roadmaster ordered O'Clannahan to build a tool house exactly halfway between the two mileposts located just past the Sanlando passenger dept. 
    To locate the desired spot, O'Clannahan said to one of his gandy dancers, "I'll walk south from the north milepost and you walk north from the south milepost and we'll meet in the middle.
    This plan was carried out and the tool-house was built at the point where the two men met.  The job had hardly been finished when the surveyor, Princeton Penman, said, "O'Clannahan, I've heard how you located the midway point and i want to tell you you're off on your reckoning.  You are a tall man with a long stride and that gandy dancer is a little squirt who barely steps two feet if that.  Now I've measured the distance and find your tool house to be 90 feet nearer the south post than the north post.  You better fix the problem before the roadmaster catches the blunder and calls you down."
    A week later the roadmaster turned up and said, "Well, O'Clannahan, is that tool house exactly halfway between the mileposts?"
    "Yes, sir. precisely," said O'Clannahan. 
    "Buy I hear you first built the tool-house in the wrong spot.  Did you have any bother moving it to the right place?"
     "No bother sir," said O'Clannahan, "I didn't move the house.  I moved the post."

                                                                    (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-301119154730.jpeg)

                                                                                                               O"Clannahan's Track gang - He's on the left in the vest.



                                                                                                                           
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on November 30, 2019, 05:09:18 PM
That's a great story!


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on November 30, 2019, 05:59:22 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on November 30, 2019, 08:25:58 PM
Makes sense to me.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on December 01, 2019, 09:22:49 AM
Ya just gotta love the ingenuity of the Irish.....good one Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on December 06, 2019, 05:40:54 PM
Ya just gotta love the ingenuity of the Irish.....good one Bill.  8)

I will second that

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on December 07, 2019, 04:40:58 PM
Saturday Report - December 7, 2019 (78the Anniversary of Pearl Harbour.  1550 hours, 74 degrees and sunny.  Sorry about that.

    The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours.  We marveled at the new computer installed in the president's office while your reporter enjoyed a cold Coca-Cola. 
    Today was Seaboard Day and we powered up our SAL E8A units to pull a freight through the Midlands, up to Summit and back down to the Midlands with some set-outs in Tahope.
    Greg Demayo and Bob Butts arrived around 10:00 a.m. and we made a close inspection of Bob's newest construction effort.  Then we adjourned for lunch at Smokey Bones. 
    After lunch, we traveled by automobile to Lucerne Towers in Orlando to visit Jim Miller, who is recovering from open-heart surgery and in rehab there.  Jim appears to be recovering nicely and is expected to go home in about a week.  You can tell he's feeling much better than last week when we visited him because of the level of complaining.  Anyway, since Claire brought him his laptop, he is now back on the forum and can receive well wishes from his friends, if any. 



                                                                           (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-071219162504.jpeg)

                                                                                           SAL E8's in freight service near the work train spur

                                                                            (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-071219162712.jpeg)

                                                                                             SAL E8's spotted near Whalen's Apiary

This week's story is one that covers events that nearly resulted in the economic ruin of the A&S Railroad.  Over its lifetime, the A&S has survived both fire and flood, but a hostile takeover nearly did it in.  Here is the story.

                                                                                                         THE HOSTILE TAKEOVER

In 1948, the Atlantic Coast LIne Railroad, the successor to Henry B. Plant's West Florida railroad empire, decided it would be in its best interest to acquire the Atlantic & Southern Railroad.  ACL began to quietly buy up A&S stock.  When it became obvious that a hostile takeover bid was looming, A&S's President dedicated himself to resist it.

It was a David and Goliath struggle, with the little A&S coming up against the enormous resources of the ACL.  A&S'a lawyer, Marvin Bello, was up against the big-name railroad lawyers from Washington, D.C.

A stockholder's action was filed in the federal court in Orlando and the parties got set for trial.  It was decided that the ACL would settle for trackage rights over the A&S if the A&S could extend its line to Summit and construct a major freight yard there within 90 days.  Failure to extend the line as agreed would forfeit the title of the A&S to the ACL. 

A&S's Superintendent of Maintenance, Will Fixer, was enlisted to supervise construction and he laid into the task.  He marshaled  Patrick O'Clannahan's track gang and hired Joe Steeler, a former Army Supply Sergeant, to scrounge material.  Steeler searched the swampy areas adjacent to the mainline for previously purloined rails and, when added to some second-hand rails acquired by abandoning some seldom-used spurs, there were enough rails to do the job.  Ties were easy to get from Piney Woods.  Spikes and related iron pieces were purchased from the proceeds of a bake sale sponsored by Sweaty Betty and Paula Deen Perkins.

A&S's Number 71, an 0-8-0, was enlisted to push the flat cars up the Ovalix to Summit and on the first day the gang went to work with both speed and daring.  It was late November and they suffered from cold in the 60-degree weather.  (They were Florida boys from Tahope County.)  The construction went on schedule until it was discovered through miscalculation, there lacked about mile of track.

With only a day left to complete the contract, Will Fixer directed O'Clannahan to tear up the rails in Tahope and use them to complete the yard at Summit. 

The ACL lawyers discovered the missing rails when they exited Trackside Tavern that evening.  They promptly filed motions with the court for forfeiture of the A&S to the ACL on the basis of the implied condition that construction of the yard at Summit would not interfere with mainline operations on the A&S.  But Marvin Bello, who never lost a case, argued the agreement was complete as written and parole evidence of some implied condition was inadmissible.

"Judgment in favor of the A&S," said his Honor.

After leaving court, lead counsel for the ACL approached Marvin Bello and said, "You know, Marvin, you don't know squat about running a railroad, but you're one hell of a lawyer."  Then they all retired to Trackside Tavern, along with the Mayor and the City Council to enjoy a cold beer, sausage, and a performance by "Toots" Hussey, Maggie's older sister. (See Story of a Fallen Woman, page 28.)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on December 07, 2019, 05:39:12 PM
Fantastic story Judge.  I can't believe you came up with that story while sitting here.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on December 08, 2019, 09:07:20 AM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on December 08, 2019, 09:27:56 AM
Wonderful story Bill..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Bruce Oberleitner on December 08, 2019, 01:47:08 PM
Glad to hear that Jim Miller is doing better.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on December 08, 2019, 04:15:32 PM
Hey Bill:

I agree great story and glad to hear Jim Miller is doing better.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on December 14, 2019, 05:30:57 PM
Saturday Report - December 14, 2019.

The Board convened at 0830, as usual.  The main topic was the installation of lighting in a Walthers Mainline Southern coach.  The A&S purchased several (11) of these cars of various configurations with the contemplation that a lighting "kit" was available.  So, the finance officer ordered two of the kits with that in mind.  Let me tell you about the installation. 

First, it is necessary to remove the roof from the passenger car.  That is usually a project in itself with a Walthers car, but the Mainline series has a different manufacturing approach.  The "windows" are all one clear plastic strip that is attached to the roof.  The instructions say simply to grab the car on either end and twist and the roof will "pop off."  NOT SO.  The photograph on the instruction sheet pictures a woman's hands doing this job and we can testify that ain't gonna happen.  We wrestled with the car and finally inserted toothpicks between the roof line and the car body to spread the body apart enough to remove the roof.

Once the roof was removed, we disassembled the car completely, but not by following the instructions.  The instructions said to first remove the "force-fitted" vestibule wall.  Ours was glued to the car deck.  No problem.  we unscrewed the floor and removed it.  This allowed the metal contact strips on the floor to fall out.   Then we tried to follow the directions using the photographs provided to install the contact devices against the front bulkhead of the car.  They are designed to be left and right contacts but the instructions leave that out.  in addition, the contacts have a small hole in them that is supposed to fit over a plastic stud in the bulkhead.  Unfortunately, the hole was too small to fit and had to be reemed out.  It was at this point when we determined that you can not test the lighting system unless you fully reassemble the car.  So, we proceeded to do just that.  Naturally, the lights didn't work and we got to practice removing the roof again.  A second assembly/disassembly provided the same results.  So, frustrated at the failure of this supposedly straight forward project, we gave up for the day.  Oh well, only an hour and a half was wasted.  Further adjustments may make the project a success, but that will have to be later in the week. 

Recommendation - Buy the Walthers passenger cars with lighting included.  Walthers has figured out how to make you wish you did.  Let some little Chinese girl install the lighting and don't complain about the extra cost. 

                                                                        (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-141219171018.jpeg)
                                                                                             The car - Just twist and the roof will "pop off." 

                                                                        (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-141219171324.jpeg)
                                                                                                     It takes tooth picks to remove the roof


                                                                        (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-141219171655.jpeg)

                                                                                                     Walthers' version of Fifty-two Pick-up




                                                                                                    THE GREAT PAY CAR ROBBERY

On the 15th of each month, the Atlantic & Southern finance department issues cash payments for employees working "out on the line."  This monthly activity has not gone unnoticed by certain unsavory characters who are temporary residents in The Bottoms.

Two of these vagabonds, Wormey and Michael "Thumbs" Morgan, decided to take advantage of the pay schedule and withdraw a little pay for themselves.   They nailed a drag coming up the ovalix from The Bottoms and snuck into the Sanlando yard.  The pay car was spotted in front of the Depot awaiting the all-clear to move to the main and distribute pay in Piney Woods and then up the Ovalix to Summit. 

Wormey had his "piece" concealed in his ragged coat.  The plan was to advance to the pay car and demand the paymaster "stand and deliver" like days of old.  No one ever gave either of these two would-be robbers credit for having a lot of sense. 

Naturally, the would-be robbers did not contemplate that the railroad knew the pay car made its regular schedule and provided armed guards for security.  When the robbers demanded the paymaster to "stand and deliver, " they were met with the barrels of three double-barreled shotguns and were taken into custody by Officer Poovey of the Tahope Police Department.   

The trial commenced two weeks later with the defendants representing themselves.  The jury was out for less than ten minutes and found them guilty.  Since nobody was hurt and the charge was only attempted robbery, Judge Elvin P. Thomas sentenced them both to five years in Florida's prison, saying "Yer lucky you didn't git any monetary remuneration from this caper.  it could have been life."  A just result for two bad men who only tried to commit a crime and didn't have sense enough to complete it.

                                                                       (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-141219172622.jpeg)

                                                                                                                  The Pay Car
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on December 14, 2019, 05:59:53 PM
Judge,

Great train robbery story! The attempt to install lights in one of Walthers economy Budd passenger cars, not so great. :'( Just saying.

Tom  8)

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on December 14, 2019, 07:02:39 PM
Oh well. try, try again (either the lights or the robbery).

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on December 14, 2019, 08:07:54 PM
Great story Bill. Those darn people from the Bottoms.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on December 14, 2019, 08:47:14 PM
Let's  hear it for the outstanding A&S security guys.....another winner Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on December 21, 2019, 04:02:06 PM
Saturday Report - December 20, 2019  - 72 degrees and partly cloudy

This is the monthly Saturday when the Babe and Tom venture to Mt. Dora for the beauty treatment.  So, there is no formal Saturday Report.

However, there needs to be some follow-up on my last missive complaining about the Walthers lighting kit for Mainline passenger cars.  My opinion of the kit has not changed.  But my attitude has changed for the better.  Tom never gives up on a project until it is in the state of perfection and he figured out how to install the lighting kits with only a minimum of adjustment to the kit.  He is working his own thread on the subject and there is no need to try to make my comments redundant.  However, once the Langford solution is applied to these cars they work perfectly and the lights are actually constant intensity.  It just takes a little extra effort (on top of the plenty of extra effort already needed to install a simple light bar.)  We should ultimately have a nine-car Southern RR passenger train pulled by green, white, and gold E7's.  At that point we will have to decide if the grab iron kits are worth it.

The basis of this week's story comes from tales my father told me when I was growing up.  Dad lived in Lakeland, Florida, and that city had a large (ACL) roundhouse and repair facility.  in the years before WWI until the end of steam, some of the lucky high school boys got to get up early each morning and wake up (call) the engine crews who were bunked in a hotel near the railroad.  After waking up the crew, they got to hang out in the roundhouse until school time and watch the goings-on.  Naturally, these young lads were called "Call boys." 

Now some of the readers of this Report are familiar with the term "call girls."  Call girls were (and still are) in the business of recreation and not furthering the schedule of the railroad.  Call boys had little in common with call girls unless, during the wake-up process, an out-of-town railroader happened to acquire one for recreational purposes.  In that event, call boys were sworn to secrecy and sometimes given a 50 cent piece for their silence. 

The Lakeland roundhouse could perform all but the most major repairs and I remember tales of changing a tire on a Copperhead ten-wheeler and, while my dad watched, two mechanics loosened a fixture on a locomotive while one of them held a 5' chisel to the fixture and the other one slammed it with a sledgehammer.   It was dirty work and, after school, some of the call boys would return to the roundhouse for more introduction into the world of steam maintenance.  I'm sure their mothers, like my grandmother, had a few things to say when their children came home covered with grease and coal dust. 

Anyway, this week's story has to do with the life and lot of call boys on the Atlantic & Southern RR.

                                                                                                                   CALL BOYS

During the steam era, mostly before WWII, the crews would "tie up" for the evening at the Tahope Roundhouse and spend the night in the Hotel Imperial in downtown Tahope.  Now the A&S was always cost-conscious and the rooms at the Imperial met the standards of the day but were not fancy.  The hotel was a 19th-century structure that had only recently had electricity installed, along with indoor plumbing.  it had no elevators but each floor had a bath and shower at the end of the hall.

In those days, the A&S hired high school boys as call boys.  Their job was to awaken the crews before dawn so they could arrive at the roundhouse on time to make their regular runs. 

These boys usually made 25 cents a day for their efforts, which was a good stipend in the days before the Great War. 

Railroaders are an ornery bunch and call boys learned to be on the alert for angry men who were awakened after a night of drinking at the Trackside Tavern and only a few hours of sleep.  They also learned to be discrete in the event they discovered a railroader from out of town who had managed to find some feminine company for the night.  In such cases, their discretion was handsomely rewarded with a generous contribution for their silence. 

The City of Tahope is a division point on the A&S RR and a number of boys from Tahope County High School were chosen to be call boys.  The school principal made recommendations from the best-behaved students and the railroad picked from the list.  Kids like "Bennie" Cartwright, who was captain of the school football team, and Willie Hunter, whose father was president of the Tahope State Bank, were chosen, while Duffy Doofer and Charlie "Catfish" Baker, both of whom had juvenile records, were not.

"Bennie" would awaken at 4:00 a.m. and report to the yardmaster's office.  By that time the hostlers were well on their way to building up steam in the boilers of the engines scheduled to make a morning run.  The yardmaster gave Bennie his list of crew members to wake up and he began his wake-up calls.  Today's list included a young brakeman from Jacksonville named Jack O'Malley and when Bennie opened the hotel room door to awaken him, he discovered a young lass keeping him warm.  Yes, it was Maggie Hussey, supplementing her income from the Trackside Tavern.  Maggie knew Bennie from 4-H Club activities before she was expelled from school so that cost O'Malley an additional 50 cents to keep Bennie silent about the encounter.

The job of being a call boy was perfect for these boys because they could hang out in the roundhouse after the crews were awakened and snoop around to see what was going on.  They could listen to the tales told by the crews and learn a thing or two about railroading. 

But all good things come to an end, and soon they had to be off to school to learn about things that had nothing to do with being a railroad engineer, which is what they all wanted to do.

                                                                       (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-211219154740.jpeg)

                                                                                                             The Hotel Impeerial

                                                                       (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-211219154924.jpeg)

                                                                                            Inside the Roundhouse Early in the Morning
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on December 21, 2019, 08:09:13 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on December 22, 2019, 09:14:44 AM
Sounds like a fun job, but the hours kinda suck..... ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on December 28, 2019, 04:08:49 PM
Saturday Report - December 27, 2019.  Temp. 75 degrees, partly cloudy.  Drizzle intermittently. 

The Bored Directors convened promptly at 0830 hours.  The main topic was inventory reduction.  We decided to liquidate some locomotives that are duplicates and have been stored in their boxes for over 10 years.  Management will probably use Ebay, but if any of the readers of this report are in the market for ACL or SAL diesels, give Tom a jingle.

The morning was taken up with running a POL train (that's petroleum, oil, and lubricants to you non-military types) powered by two ACL purple and silver Geep 7's from the Bottoms to Summit where the tankers were dropped and a 21-car mixed freight was made up.  This train made its rounds at Summit and returned to Sanlando yard just prior to lunch.  Oh, yes, the session was interrupted by the arrival of Bob Butts and Greg DeMayo.  We all went to lunch at Smokey Bones.

After lunch, a lash-up of two Central of Georgia E7's with a C of G SD9 sandwiched in between made the rounds on the Tahope level. 

Then we called it a day.

This week's story will be familiar to those who remember their first day on a new job.  There are invariably screw-ups that embarrass the new employee, but ususally they are survivable. 

                                                                                                            FIRST DAY ON THE JOB

Those who follow this weekly Report will recall that "shiftless skonk," Shortstack achieved promotion from roundhouse sweeper to brakeman due to his heroic, although self-preserving, efforts to save a runaway coal drag which was speeding down the Ovalix.  You will also recall that Shortstack was instructed to report to the roundhouse and get his name on the Extra Board. 

It was shortly afterward when Shortstack received a "call" to brake train #44, the ACL daily local that originates at Sanlando and meanders through Tahope, switching cars, and then proceeds up the Ovalix to Summit.  Oddly enough, Shortstack was assigned as the head-end brakeman (head shack), which meant he would ride in the cab of the engine during the trip. 

Shortstack arrived at the Sanlando diesel service facility first thing on Monday morning, ready to show his stuff on his first day at work as a paid railroader.  He walked over to the two GP&'s, numbered 313 and 311 that were assigned as power for#44.

Shortstack was the only member of the crew assigned to #44 that day who was not a veteran railroader.  The engineer assigned to #44 that day was a crusty old hogger named "Uncle Henry" O'Leary, who looked at Shortstack with disdain and didn't even bother to say "good morning" to him.  The conductor, Melvin Hatter, greeted Shortstack with a grin and warned him to "stay clear of Uncle Henry."  The fireman, whose name was Jim, busied himself with the engine and took his seat just as Uncle Henry eased the consist out of the service facility into the yard and coupled up to the 20-car train.

It was not necessary for two GP7's to be assigned to the 20-car train, but it was ACL practice to put at least two units to any consist that would travel up the Ovalix, due to recovery difficulties if there were mechanical problems with one of the engines.

Uncle Henry pulled his train out of the yard and onto the mainline, heading across the Great Divide, over the bridge at Mosquito Lagoon, through Piney Woods, and around the Bedford Forrest reverse loop to the spur leading to Tahope. 

A boxcar full of furniture was picked up at Skokill's and an empty one was left in its place.  Other boxcars were switched at industries along the way and two hopper cars were spotted under the coal tipple at the roundhouse. 

Uncle Henry must have forgotten he was running diesels because he jerked a knuckle when he dropped the coal hoppers.  That meant Shortstack, the hind shack, and the conductor got to replace the knuckle, causing much consternation and delay. 

Local ordinance prohibits the sounding of whistles or horns in downtown Tahope, so the engine crew rang the engine's bell while watching the 12-mph speed restriction.  Uncle Henry noticed the bell was not ringing normally.  The clapper would get stuck every so often.

The climb up the Ovalix was without incident and the through cars were dropped at Summit Yard, awaiting transfer to Jacksonville.  It was time for lunch, but Uncle Henry ordered Shortstack to stay with the engine while the rest of the crew walked over to a beanery for eats. 

Uncle Henry thought he could repair the problem with the bell, so he decided to move the diesels to the RIP track where it was spotted over the outdoor repair pit.  He growled at Shortstack, saying "I'm going down to see if I can repair the bell.  Don't move from your seat and don't touch anything." 

Now Shortstack wanted to make a good impression on his first day of the job, but he had been working the train for several hours an, after eight cups of black coffee, the call of nature was beckoning to him. 

The Coast Line ran their Geeps short hood first, with the bell located under the short hood.  The crew's toilet was located down a couple of steps in the short hood and Shortstack decided it would be better to use the toilet instead of the great outdoors.  After all, Shortstack had his dignity.

After Shortstack was completely relieved, he pushed the flush handle, discharging the toilet's contents to the ground below.  That is when he heard Uncle Henry angrily hollering a stream of cuss words.  As Uncle Henry climbed up to the cab, Shortstack could see he was soaking wet.  I mean, how was Shortstack to know the toilet discharge pipe was located next to the bell?  Maybe that is why the sign that said "DO NOT FLUCH WHILE TRAIN IS IN STATION" was posted above the toilet. 

Shortstack made a split-second decision to dismount on the fireman's side just in time to avoid meeting up with Uncle Henry.  He ran as fast as he could to the yardmaster's office.  The yardmaster noticed Shortstack was seriously troubled and, after questioning, learned what had happened.  "Couldn't have happened to a more deserving hogger," said the yardmaster, who offered to hide Shortstack in his tool shed.

Train #444 made it back to Sanlando without Shortstack.  When he was called for another trip the next day, he was relieved (no pun intended) to learn that "Fatso" Johnson would be the engineeer. 

                                                                                (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-281219155641.jpeg)


                                                                                (http://www.modelersforum.com/gallery/684-281219155836.jpeg)
                                                                               
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on December 28, 2019, 05:00:21 PM
Another gem of a story.   ;D  I don't know how you do it.  I love following along.   ;D  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on December 28, 2019, 05:24:22 PM
"S**t happens!"


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on December 28, 2019, 06:07:32 PM
 ;D .  Another wonderful tale.


Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on December 28, 2019, 08:01:26 PM
Another awesome tale Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on December 29, 2019, 10:28:47 AM
I guess Shortstack should get points for effort, but he just might not have what is required for this type of employment..... :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jbvb on December 30, 2019, 11:33:07 AM
Many 'dry hopper' toilets I used up through the '80s were simpler - a 6" pipe through which you could see the ties passing (and feel a cold draft in season).  Lightweight passenger cars (though not the B&M's Budd RDCs) had fancier setups with a pan that actually flushed. Amtrak Heritage 10-6s were the last in service AFAIK.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on December 30, 2019, 03:21:17 PM
James - When I was just a tot (age 9) my mother and I traveled from Millen, Georgia, where her brother and sister lived, to Orlando by train.  The train was powered by one of C O G's beautiful 4700 series 4-8-2's. The C of G took us from Millen to Savannah and we rode in a 1920's ventage 14 section Pullman.  The Pullman was switched to the ACL passenger train (diesel-powered) at night and we woke up in Orlando the next morning.  It was the only time I got to sleep in a Pullman section.  I do remember the toilet flushing directly onto the roadbed and that was the way things were well into the 60's when I took the train from Chattanooga to Orlando.  I know the environmentalists must have been at work to change that sewage disposal system but for the life of me, I cannot remember anyone getting sick from licking ballast or the aquafer being polluted due to the waste.   

What happened?  Maybe I will Google it.

The Judge
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on December 31, 2019, 07:56:33 AM
Hey Judge:

The Brownsville Station looks great. Like the color changes from the ones in the kit. I also really like that tall hotel.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: vinceg on December 31, 2019, 09:59:24 AM
Hey Judge:

The Brownsville Station looks great. Like the color changes from the ones in the kit. I also really like that tall hotel.

Karl

Yes, indeed. The Brownsville station looks fantastic. Any chance we could get some close-ups?
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on December 31, 2019, 10:12:31 AM
Hey Judge:

The Brownsville Station looks great. Like the color changes from the ones in the kit. I also really like that tall hotel.

Karl

Yes, indeed. The Brownsville station looks fantastic. Any chance we could get some close-ups?


Vince,

I'll get some and post them on the regular Atlantic and Southern build thread.  Appreciate the interest. Reading Bob built this beautiful kit for me.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jbvb on January 03, 2020, 08:29:10 AM
B&M employee timetables specified that passenger train crews must lock toilet doors approaching stations and on a couple of line segments near public water supplies.  I don't know how often they actually did that, particularly in the commuter district.  And of course, that didn't affect those who could afford Pullman spaces with private toilets (drawing room, compartment, double bedroom, roomette).  I do know I sometimes encountered waste when walking the track in my hometown. There was only one round-trip a day and its final stop was about a half mile east of where I was walking.  I remember thinking those passengers must have been in a hurry, regardless of whether the train was arriving or departing.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 04, 2020, 04:32:17 PM
Saturday, January 4, 2020.   70 degrees and overcast.

The Board of Directors met this morning promptly at 0830 hours and discussed the pressing question of the day - installation of lighting in the Walthers Mainline passenger cars.  We decided to install lights in two coaches.  Your reporter was given the opportunity to have fun installing the little metal pieces that have to be threaded on the plastic tips that stick out of the forward bulkhead.  Smaller fingers would have helped but after much muttering, the deed was done.  Completed installation on each coach was disappointing.  We got to disassemble the whole thing more than once and determined it was the use of the wrong screws that caused the problem.  Switching the screws around gave us additional confidence in the process of assembly and now we have two more coaches to list on our Southern Roster.  We decided that lights in the RPO/baggage car would be counterproductive so we added it to the fleet sans illumination.

Lunch was at Smokey Bones and back to the layout.  Construction crew has been working on the south end of the A&S (see Tom's thread) and the decision was made to add trees and other scenery in that area instead of more structures, at least on the south side of the Tahope River.  Good decision.  That area is very rural and already has a furniture plant and a pest control business in place.

Happiness and Joy!  Our decoder installer has decided to come out of retirement and two Southrn E8 diesels were delivered to him this afternoon.  This takes much pressure off of the A&S President so he can continue progress on the railroad.

The idea for this week's story came from one of my favorite Mark Twain tales.  I wonder how he would go over on late-night television today.

                                                                                                               THE REA ICEMAN

You may remember Newt Fisher, Luke and Tallula's boy.  Newt lived with his parents in one of the shacks on Eaton's Curve until he moved to the Bottoms at age 32. 

Well, Newt finally managed to get a job with the Railway Express Agency (REA) as a baggage watchman.  His job involved riding in the REA baggage car and protecting the cargo entrusted to his employer.  The job was perfect for Newt because he didn't have to do anything in particular and, while the train was between stations, he could catch some shut-eye.

Some of the REA baggage cars had standard vestibules that allowed access to the rest of the passenger cars.  The car assigned to the Seaboard's Silver Meteor had such a car in January 1950, and Newt was in charge of security for its contents.

Naturally, Newt found it convenient to roam through the train between stations on the trip from Tahope to Jacksonville.

Now, there was a party of salesmen who boarded the Meteor in Tampa who were headed for Washington and they were having a good time playing poker in the club car.  Since none of them were temperance men, they decided to order a drink.  The porter apologized and said, "I'll be happy to git y'all a drink, but there ain't no ice."   

Newt happened to be observing the card game and he offered a solution.  "I've got cargo that has to be iced down and a little won't be missed if I bring it for your convenience."  So Newt disappeared for a few minutes while he retrieved a bucket of ice and the drummers all had a drink.  Newt got free drinks as compensation.
There were refills as the night went on and Newt made several trips to get more ice.

Around midnight, Newt was asked to make another ice run, but he declined.  One of the salesmen offered to pay some cash for more ice but Newt had to politely decline, saying "I sure could use some cash and I could get more ice, but I'm afraid if I take any more off of the corpse it will spoil."

It's good to have a dedicated employee like Newt.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on January 04, 2020, 05:49:46 PM
Awesome ending Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on January 04, 2020, 05:53:07 PM
Terrific story Bill.  I think I'll start drinking my Jameson neat.   :P
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 04, 2020, 05:56:07 PM
Didn't see that one coming.....great story Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 04, 2020, 09:38:54 PM
No more ice for me!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Bruce Oberleitner on January 05, 2020, 11:54:42 AM
No more ice for me!

Ditto
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 11, 2020, 04:01:28 PM
Atllatic & Sourhern Saturday Report - January 10, 2020 Temperature in Central Florida, Partly cloudy, 81 degrees

The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours and spent considerable time deciding how to "thin out" our passenger car inventory.  Sooo, if any of you are chomping at the bit for Walthers passenger cars of the Pennsy or Southern RR persuasion, we've got 'em and they are going on Ebay unless you speak up. 

Our guests today were the usual suspects , including Curt Webb, Greg DeMayo, and (late arrival) Bob Butts.  Bob was given an all 'round attaboy for his lighting efforts on Sokols Furniture Factory.  Bob, who must have infinate patience, installed forty lights inside and on the exterior of the building.  The A&S electric bill will undoubtedly go up accordingly.   Here is a pic of the finished product.  Much better photo coverage next week after detailing and landscaping has been done.

                                                                             (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-110120145752.jpeg)

Our TCS Wow Sound intaller has come out of retirement and he installed new decoders in our new Southern E8's.  We wonder why Walthers thinks LOC Sound is a good system for locomotives.  We are very disappointed in the product and both of the decoders that came with our new E8's were defective.    These units are no longer available and, while it stretched the A&S budget, we were glad to get them.  See page 28 for a photo.  Probably more pics next week. The air tanks on the roof make these models interesting. 

Regular readers of this report will recall the mild complaining about installing lights in Walthers Mainline passenger cars.  Well, we now have six cars on the track and only three to go.

We adjourned to Smokey Bones for lunch and engaged in BS, as usual.

Upon return to "The Shed" we calibrated the new E8's and ran a Southern passenger train.  The lead truck on one car had a wheel out of gage and some other gremlin, causing derailments.  The gage problem was an easy fix and turning the truck the other way around fixed the gremlin. 

This week's story involves a by-gone occupation, the RPO mail clerk. 

                                                                                                         The Origin of "Sack Time"

Almost from the beginning of railroading,until the 1960's, when the airlines stole the business, every passenger train had a Railway Post Office (RPO) car.  The last mail run was in 1977.  The U. S. Mail is the business of the Federal Post Office and the governmnet contracted with the railroads to carry mail to the cities along their ruoutes. 

The mail clerks had to pass a rigoruous examination and they were very skilled and dedicated to the joby of sorting and delivering the mail.  Sometimes the RPO cars also served as baggage cars and sometimes they doubled as crew dormitories, but there was always a crew of clerks who sorted the mail into mail sacks.  Pick-up of mail bags was accomplished by "catching on the fly" through the use of a snagging device called a trackside crane, which was attached to the door of the RPO.  Deliveries were made by simply tossing out the sack of mail from the moving train with enough force to clear the car.  This manual sorting, collecting and delivering was all very low tech, but the government claimed a 99% accuracy rate for delivery. 

THe mail clerks developed a language all their own in order to get the mail sorted, sometimes under great pressure, especially during short trips between stations.  But it was not all work and no play, particularly when the mail stops were many miles apart.

The Atlantic & Southern RR was a government-designated United States Mail Carrier and employed and furnished clerks for all of the railroads that had trackage rights over the A&S.  New employees were called apprentices and were subjected to good-natured hazing until they achieved clerk status. 

Henry Herder was an apprentice on the A&S with a run on ACL's Champion from Tahope to Jacksonville.  He recalled that during the early '50's the mail would be sorted before the train reached Palatka and the clerks could get a little "sack time" from Palatka to Jacksonville.  "Sack time" was literally that.  The RPO had hundreds of mail sacks and those not in immediate use were piled up at the end of the car.  Clerks used to stretch out on the sacks and catch a quick nap. 

Naturally, the clerks who were old-timers liked to have fun with the new apprentices.  One apprentice was told to distribute the mail "nice and evenly" among the sacks without regard to destination.  Another apprentice boasted of the fairest distribution ever made.  Following instructions, he dumped all of the mail on a big table and, when the engineer whistled for a station, he looked to see how big the town was and filled the sack for delivery proportionately before he threw the sack out the door.


                                                                          (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-110120154734.jpeg)

                                                                                               RPO Heavyweight at the turn of the Century


                                                                           (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-110120155129.jpeg)

                                                                                                            Interrior of RPO in the '20's

The videos below are instructional on how the RPO"s operated during their hay-day.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IirDQzgzlQg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnGfWw7Bgu0




 

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on January 11, 2020, 08:27:18 PM
Interesting story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 12, 2020, 08:14:01 AM
RPO workers were also Signal 0, meaning armed.  :-X

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 12, 2020, 08:56:32 AM
That must have been a fun job in its day.....neat story & videos Bill. I bet Jesse and Frank James didn't mess with those Signal 0 feds.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on January 12, 2020, 01:39:00 PM
Thanks for the video links, Judge.  The first is at the Illinois Railway Museum.  The RPO is a restored CB&Q car.  :)

Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on January 13, 2020, 08:15:50 AM
Hey judge:

Sokols came out very nicely. Great job.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 13, 2020, 05:26:38 PM
Karl - While I thank you for the compliment, I cannot take credit for Sokol's.  That was the artistic work of Reading Bob Butts.  Forty lights!  I almost can't count that high.  Wouldn't have a reason to except for my age, which is 41.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 17, 2020, 09:28:23 AM
.....Wouldn't have a reason to except for my age, which is 41.


Huh..... ??? ??? ???
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 18, 2020, 04:01:54 PM
Saturday Report January 18, 2020.  Central Florida Temperature - High 70's and clear.

This week's Saturday Report will not contain a weekly "story" because the Forum is under renovation and photographs cannot be guaranteed for posting.  Unfortunately, this week's story had several photographs.  So, this week's Report will only memorialize today's activities on the A&S Railroad.  Next week's report will be with story, hopefully, but without Report, because it is the Babe's Saturday for travel to Mount Dora to have her hair done.

The weekly meeting of the Board of Directors convened promptly at 0830 hours.  The Board was given an opportunity to view the completed Cresent Limited passenger train, composed of Walthers Mainline cars with lighting installed.  The train consists of two back-to-back Southern E8 A units decked out in green, white and gold, followed by the only brand new, freshly painted REA freight car ever seen on any railroad, a baggage/RPO car, a baggage/lounge car, four coaches, a dinner, two sleepers, and a sleeper/lounge observation car.  The train performed reasonably well on it maiden voyage, except the dinner car had a tendency to derail.  (It seems like therer is one problem car in every passenger train.)  Fortunately, the A&S car maintenance team got right on it and successfully corrected the problem with the defective truck.  All cars are lighted, but, wouldn't you know it, the dinner light doesn't work.  Due to installation difficulties with the car, it will have to be scrapped and replaced wtih one of its identical twins.  Too bad, after all that work (fun) fixing the derail problem.

The Cresent traveled around  Summit and drifted down the Ovalix to the Midlands and back with ease.  It is an impressive train.  However, all readers who are interested in purchasing these Mainline cars should beware!  The installation of the lighting system is more trouble than it is worth.  The instructions are poor and the parts do not always fit.  Besides, the kits will not work reliably unless some soldering is done to make a good electrical connection.  Our car maintenance department recommends spending the extra bucks and buying the regular Walthers cars.  Additionally, some of the cars need paint touch-up and one would expect a better product from Waltthers.

We spent much of the morning admiring the progress on the South end of the railroad.  Beehives have been delivered to the Apiary and it should be a going business soon.  The bees are expected to produce hundreds of pints of Orange Blossom Honey regularly, thereby increasing A&S revenue shipments "up Nawth" during the spring and summer.

                                                                                                         WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENT!

  Officer and Mrs. Eldridge Poovey recently announced the marriage of their daughter, Daffodil, to George (Crack-a-Diamond) Musselwhite.  Daffy is a recent graduate of Tahope County High School, where she excelled in shop and auto mechanics.  George is a fireman for the Seaboard Air Line Railroad.  The wedding took place at the City of Tahope Police Station under armed guard.  The bride wore her new Levi skirt, jacket and tennis shoes.  The groom, who was handcuffed, wore his "Sunday-go-to-meeting suit, with his fireman's hat and bandana.  The couple will honeymoon at Delwin's Fish Camp.  Their first child is expected in March of this year.   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 18, 2020, 09:20:12 PM
Glad to see the Cresent going Bill.....amazing the alarming number of this type of wedding in Tahope.

The city does not seem to be losing their population to the big cities, which is a good thing if the city fathers want to keep it a thriving town.  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 25, 2020, 05:03:02 PM
SATURDAY REPORT WILL BE DELAYED UNTIL NOON JAN. 26.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on January 26, 2020, 09:31:22 AM
Saturday Report January 26, 2020.  Weather in Tahope County - Sunny and 50 degrees.  High expected - 66 degrees.

There is no formal Saturday Report today.  However, there is a story.

                                                                                           SOKOL FURNITURE AND MATTRESS COMPANY
  The Sokol Furniture and Mattress Factory is located on the outskirts of the City of Tahope, just north of the Tahope River Bridge.  It was founded by Marty Sokol in 1887.  It survived the panic of 1893 largely because of its location next to the railroad tracks of the A&S Railroad.  Marty Sokol shipped furniture made from Florida pine and oak to Jacksonville and as far north as Savannah and Charleston.  Because his furniture was of superior quality, his products were brought to the attention of George M. Pulman, who, by that time, was one of the era's famous millionaires.  Pullman contracted with Sokol to furnish some of his private palace cars.  Pullman recommended Sokol to one of his buddies, Henry M. Flagler, who purchased furniture from Sokol to furnish many of his hotels, which were popping up all along Florida's east coast.  Sokol's reputation spread throughout the burgeoning Florida hotel industry and the company's customer base included the finest hotels in the state. 
  Marty Sokol's son, Manny, took over the business after WWI and survived the Great Depression due to the company's hotel customers. 
  By 1950, the City of Tahope was dominated by five industries, including the Atlantic & Southern Railroad, the Florida Citrus and cattle industry, the petroleum distribution center, the honey apiary, and Sokol's Furniture and Mattress Company.  Sokol's employed over 40 skilled craftsmen carpenters, finishers, weavers, and upholsterers on a year-round basis and took on some part-time help during the busy summer season.
  In January 1950, Manny Sokol was looking for a secretary/office assistant.  He advertised in the Tahope Daily Blatter and got a good response from several young women who had just graduated from Tahope High School, including a perky little former cheerleader named Peaches Weaver.  (You remember Peaches, don't you?  She celebrated her 18th birthday in the back seat of a 1950 Buick Roadmaster that belonged to her boyfriend's father.  See pp. 10-11).  Peaches had been an "A" student and could type and file so she was hired on the spot. 
  Marty decided to finance a marketing campaign to increase his market share form the sale of mattresses to the local citizens.  He hired a marketing consultant who recommended that he utilize some of the local talent to kick off the big sale.  He renovated part of the front of the factory building to include a glass window display and installed a fully furnished bedroom for observation of passing customers.  He placed an advertisement on the wall by the front entrance for a mattress tester.

                                                                                                                 WANTED!
                                                LANKY, LAZY LOUT WHO CAN SLEEP AT LEAST 12 HOURS STRAIGHT AS A MATTRESS TESTER.  SALARY, $2.00 A DAY. 
                                                                                             NO PRIOR EMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

  Days went by, which turned into weeks, and no applicants responded for the job. 
  Donnie (Shortstack) Turner had just gotten out of jail for molesting a blue crab trap when he stumbled by Sokol's on his way to nail a drag back to the Bottoms.  He happened upon the ad when he stopped at the factory for a handout.  Feeling fully qualified, he decided to put off celebrating his new found freedom and apply for the job, saying, "I cain't go home to the Bottoms, they needs me here."  Shortstack presented himself to the president's office and asked Peaches for a job application.  He told her he had just gotten out of jail and all they gave him there was "three hots and a cot" and this job would be a great improvement. 
  Well, Shortstack was given a shower and a shave and furnished with a brand new pair of pajamas.  Then he was shown to his bed and Peaches instructed him on his duties.  Shortstack, a great admirer of feminine pulchritude, asked her if she would like to help him test the mattress.  That was a mistake.  No sooner than when he got the words out of his mouth two rather large furniture movers, who worked as bouncers at Butts Bar-B-Que on Saturday nights  showed him the door.  That ended Shortstack's mattress testing career.
  But, as Shortstack said to his fellow bums when he returned to the Bottoms, "At least I got a shower, a shave, and a new pair of pajamas.  Let's hope he got a bowl of Mulligan stew and a drink of "corn squeezins' to quench his thurst.


                                                                            (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-260120091405.jpeg)

                                                                                     Skokol's has 40 lights installed in and around the building


                                                                            (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-260120091659.jpeg)
 
                                                                                          The loading dock at Sokol's is a busy place.
 
                                                                               (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-260120092136.jpeg)

                                                                  This is Peaches.  The photo appeared in the "The Swamp Cabbage," her high school yearbook.   

 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on January 26, 2020, 10:30:29 AM
Well, in Shortstacks defense ya can't blame a feller for try'in.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on January 26, 2020, 10:35:04 AM
Some fellas just can't catch a break..... or any feminine pulchritude.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on January 26, 2020, 01:23:34 PM
Looks like Peaches has a sexy attitude to go with her pulchritude!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on January 26, 2020, 02:44:00 PM
"If at first you don't succeed, try, try again".
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on January 26, 2020, 06:50:37 PM
Another great story.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 01, 2020, 04:16:04 PM
                                                                                                     
Saturday Morning Report - February 1, 2020.  Temperature in mid-60's and rainy.
    The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours and discussed the need for diesel switchers.  It was decided to keep two ALCO S-2 switchers (ACL and SAL) for use in the two yards and perhaps keep two EMD switchers as well. 
     The newly acquired Southen passenger train was moved to the Bottoms and the L&N passenger train, which is powered by two E6A units, climbed the 1 percent grade up the Ovalix to the Midlands for a run through Sanlando and Piney Woods.  Then it climbed to Summit and made a run until nearly 11:00 a.m. 
    Gregg Demayo arrived about 10:15 and he accompanied us to Smokey Bones for lunch. 
    After lunch, we changed motive power on the L&N streamliner by coupling an L&N L-1 4-8-2 onto the consist.  The steamer pulled the eight-car mixed smooth side and heavyweight cars without difficulty on level track, although we are sure that helper service will be needed ascending the Ovalix.
    A good time was had by all and the management is particularly proud of the progress made on the south end of the railroad.

   Today's story continues our survey of different railroad occupations.  The words "boomer" and "brakey" sort of go together.

                                                                                                         Vanishing Types

                                                                                                              The Boomer

    The Boomer was an itinerant railroader who traveled light, skipping at short notice from one railroad to another, sometimes just ahead of the law.  A boomer would sign on as a "brakey" on railroads like the A&S after a cursory interview, usually by the yardmaster.  Back in the link and pin days, those applicants with missing fingers were selected because they had "experience."  The new hires would be issued a "Pie Book" which contained a number of "pie cards" that were supposed to hold him over until payday for meals at Sweaty Betty's Diner.  The cost of the "Pie Book" was deducted from the boomer's first paycheck.
    The golden age of the boomers ended after WWI when hiring practices became more formal and by the mid-'20s railroaders would grouse about having to have a college education to heave coal.  Careful screening is the current hiring practice on the A&S, although being related to a current employee seems to give an advantage, much like the hiring practices in the Florida prison system.  Of course, nearly everyone in Tahope County is related in some way or other by blood, marriage, or intermarriage.  In fact, Tahope residents don't cotton to strangers and they find it is hard to fit into Tahope's "sassiety."
    Roger Russel, who was out on parole from Louisiana, wandered into Tahope from Jacksonville one day looking for work.  He tried his hand at one thing or another but he just couldn't fit in.  Finally, he walked into the A&S roundhouse and applied for a position with the A&S Railroad. 
    The Assistant Roundhouse Forman, Tater Cartwright, who had been born and raised in Tahope, hired him on as a car toad on the company RIP track.  Car toads make on the spot repairs to freight cars and perform maintenance on them. 
    Naturally, in 1950, it was customary to subject new hires to a certain amount of good-natured hazing as a form of welcome.  One of Russel's duties was to tote his boss' tool box about so Russel was ordered to bring the box to the car being repaired, only to find the box had been nailed to the wooden platform.  The boss shouted in feigned impatience, expressing his amazement at the delay.  Another incident occurred when six car toads were required to move a heavy wooded sill from one end of the RIP track platform to the other.  The men lifted the sill to their shoulders and, with Russel in the middle, the others suddenly stooped down, putting all of the weight on Russel and causing him to collapse.  Then there was the fireman who "accidentally" drenched Russel with the hose used to clean the coal dust off of the apron deck in front of the locomotive tender. 
    Russel endured the teasing with good humor.  He had learned a few things in the "joint" and he always went the extra mile to please his superiors.  He even volunteered to be a dope puller, the lowest job a car toad could be assigned.  The advantage of being a dope puller was the work was in the yard away from the RIP track platform. 
    A dope puller was assigned to inspect the hubs of freight cars awaiting transfer in the Sanlando freight yard.  It was the dope puller's job t extract "dope," (the greasy waste in the journal box of each wheel) and replace it with clean waste and grease, thus preventing "hot boxes" from friction on the revolving axel inside the journal box.  The dope puller accomplished this task by removing the dope from each journal box with a hook and placing it in a wheelbarrow.  Then he would replace the old dope with new dope.  Needless to say, the wheelbarrow was soon filled with a black greasy substance that gave new meaning to "hot and filthy."  The fact that one of Russel's co-workers gave him a friendly push backwards into the wheelbarrow filled with tar-like dope was the last straw. 
    Russel, who emerged from the wheelbarrow looking like he had been tarred without the feathers, decided to draw his road stake and strike out for the FEC.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 01, 2020, 05:08:27 PM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on February 01, 2020, 06:02:09 PM
Bill


Another fine report and story.  Thank you, again, for sharing this with us.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 01, 2020, 06:16:52 PM
Good one Bill..... ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 08, 2020, 05:01:53 PM
Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report - February 8, 2020.  Weather in Central Florida Sunny, not a cloud in the sky, temperature Mid-70's.

The Board of Directors met at 0830.  The only item on the agenda was the disposition of a Seaboard Air Line Baldwin V1000 switcher.  It was decided to install WOW Sound in it and add it to the roster.  The installation will be a challenge because the body shell is not roomy.  WOW Sound now has a couple of Baldwin prime mover sounds on its decoders and one is the V1000 engine.

Today's story takes us back to the Trackside Tavern.

                                                                                                 Doins at the Trackside Tavern

    The Trackside Tavern's new owner decided to expand the hours of operation and the diversions available to the beer joint's customers.  The back room was converted into a casino with tables for poker, craps, and blackjack.  The gambling was strictly illegal, but the profits were worth the risk.  And the City Council members were regularly in attendance.  The casino operation was managed by a sinister-looking gentleman of Chinese extraction named Charlie Wu.  Charlie had a 21-year-old daughter named Yum Yum Wu, and she ran the blackjack table.  The house rule was if you could beat Yum Yum at blackjack you would win $100.  No one ever beat her.  The customers dubbed the casino operation as "The House of Not-a-Chance." 
    Charlie also supervised the girls who provided entertainment in the bar.  The girls were supposed to provide the house with one-third of their tips for their employment as independent contractors.
    One evening towards closing time, the jukebox lured the crowd away from the backroom to give their attention to the evening's entertainment on stage.  The girls danced and wiggled and collected a considerable remuneration for their efforts.  The favorite dancer was, of course, Magnolia (Maggie) Hussy, who had recently been released from custofdy on matters not pertinent here.
    Charlie accused Maggie of skimming her tips and demanded to see the stash she kept in her garter.  It was obvious that Maggie was not reporting her earnings so Charlie fired her on the spot.
    Maggie decided she would take her act elsewhere and packed her things for a trip on the Champion to Jacksonville, where sinning was more profitable. 
    The next evening, A&S switchmen, Burns and Garbury, happened by the depot on their way to work the midnight shift in Sanlando Yard.  They saw Maggie sitting on a baggage cart waiting for the train.  Upon inquiry, they learned Maggie was out of work so they organized a group of regulars to go discuss the matter with the Tavern's management. 
    Charlie explained that Maggie was a thief and he couldn't abide by her dishonesty.  "Besides," said Charlie, "inexpensive women like Maggie are a dime a dozen." 
    Maggie, as you might imagine, had quite a following with the crowd that gathered to express their concern over the turn of events.  They held a conference and decided to offer a solution.  Burns and Gadbury asked Charlie if he would give Maggie her job back if she paid $50 each night upfront and kept all the rest of her earnings.  That seemed fair to Charlie and Maggie was rehired. 
    Later that night, she returned to her boxcar in The Bottoms for a little turtle soup and a glass of white corn liquor before counting out the $250 she made after paying Charlie $50. 

                                                                                                                     

                                                   (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-080220165503.jpeg)

                                                                                                       Charlie Wu

                                                   (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-080220165647.jpeg)

                                                                   Charlie's daughter, Yum Yum Wu
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 08, 2020, 05:10:14 PM
Now that's some shrewd deal the boys got for Maggie.....another good one Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 08, 2020, 06:33:45 PM
I've hauled Maggie in on three separate occasions.

Last I heard, her record has been sealed and not available to the public. This may be due in part to a "guvment" convention held in Tahope where Maggie made a few friends who want to remain in good standing with their constituents.

Like Sergeant Schultz once said, "I know nothing".
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 08, 2020, 08:06:27 PM
Great tale Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on February 08, 2020, 08:37:22 PM
...
Last I heard, her record has been sealed and not available to the public. ...

I guess that's why there was no accompanying photo of Maggie.  Too bad, but then this a G, or at least PG rated forum :-)

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 09, 2020, 06:33:13 AM
Dave - The only likeness we have been able to thus far find of Maggie Hussy is a short video taken when she was fishing in the Tahope River at age 15.  The video is on page 29 under The Rest of the Story.  Look for the link below the Pullman story. 

I am looking for more current photographs that I can publish on this G rated forum. 

The Judge
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 09, 2020, 09:15:45 AM
And you know that we all love pictures Bill..... :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 15, 2020, 03:58:39 PM
Saturday Report - 2-15-20  Temperature in the mid 70's and sunny here in Central Florida

The weekly meeting of the Board of Directors convened at 0830 hours.  The Board inspected the progress of the past week including installation of the facia on the Tahope Peninsula.  Some new palm trees were delivered for placement as the progress heads towards the Big Tahope River. 

The morning's railroading included a work-out for the ACL Alco S2 and a freight run of SAL F3's, and, with a power change, a GP7.  We are experiencing some problems with old (and I mean old) WOW Sound decoders.  The problems are with decoders that are so old they do not even have "Version 1" on them.  TCS happily replaces these old decoders with new and improved ones. 

Greg DeMayo arrived about 10:00 and participated in the fun until we went to lunch at Smokey Bones. 

After lunch we ran an 0-6-0 switcher and a 2-8-0 so we could hear the sound of steam.  An easy day on the A&S.

    The idea for today's story comes from a 1939 edition of Railroad Magazine, which in those days cost $.15. 

                                                                                                  First Day on the Job as a Fireman

    Willie Mason, a Tahope native, signed onto the Atlantic & Southern Railroad right after he came home from Europe after WWII.  He began working in the roundhouse but was soon promoted to brakeman.  He broke steam freight for three years and found himself on the extra board as a fireman.  Willie fired steam for a year and gained enough seniority to bid on a diesel-powered through freight that originated in Sanlando Yard and terminated in Jacksonville. 
    The first day on the job found Willie at the Sanlando diesel facility boarding a consist of three Seabord E7's.  The engineer that day was Michael O'Sullivan, a serious type, who was a 22-year veteran of the right-side seat.  O'Sullivan pulled the diesels out of the service facility and onto the mainline, heading for the yard lead into Sanlando Yard where the mixed freight consisting of 21 billboard reefers and a caboose had been assembled by the yard crew.  O'Sullivan coupled the E7's to the train. The brakeman connected the air hose to the engines and inspected the first few cars to make sure their brakes were operable.  After twenty minutes or so, the conductor signaled the air was good in the rear of the train and O'Sullivan eased the train out onto the mainline.  Two reefers were dropped at the Piney Woods Freight Station and O'Sullivan turned to his fireman, who was sitting in his chair with nothing to do, and said, "Willie, how would you lie to take her to Summit?"  Willie, who had never run a diesel locomotive in his life, was excited, to say the least.  He moved over to the engineer's seat and gingerly pulled the throttle a notch at a time until the engine speed indicator was at 49 mph, the maximum speed allowed between Piney Woods and the Ovalix. 
    The trip was uneventful until the train rounded a blind curve that hid a rural crossing at the Tahope Highway Intersection. To Willie's horror, there was a yellow 1947 Ford Coupe stopped on the track.  It appeared to be occupied by teenagers.  Willie pulled the knob that turned on the bell and gave repeated short blasts of the diesel's horn, to no avail.  The Ford just sat there.  Wilie panicked and put the brake into emergency, just about the time the driver of the Ford pulled off the track and waived, with his middle finger extended. 
    Unlike our familiar understanding of braking systems in automobiles - where an increase in pressure translates to an increase in braking power - air brakes on a train run in the opposite way.  By default, the air brake system is closed (the brakes are on).  When running, the air is pumped to fill brake cylinders on each car and the brakes are "opened."  When a triain engineer wants to apply brakes, he causes a reduction in the air pressure and that causes the brakes to "close," slowing the train in accordance with the amount of the reduction.  The logic of this system is if there is a pressure failure in the braking system, the brakes will automatically engage, thereby reducing the likelihood that a train would speed out of control. 
    When the emergency brake is applied there is a rapid loss of pressure, draining all of the air out of the brake cylinders, and the brakes slam shut.  As you can guess, this will cause the train to stop.  If the train is moving at speed, the stop will be violent and can result in a derailment.  Additionally, once the brakes are set for emergency, the train must come to a complete stop and the air must come back up to pressure before the train can move.
    The train passed the crossing and came to a stop about a half a mile down the track.  The conductor demanded an explanation as Willie waited for the the air to be recovered.  O'Sullivan addressed him, saying, "Well, Willie, did you learn anything today?"
    Willie, who was shaken up by the near-miss, went off on a tirade about how could those kids be so foolish and how it would have been a tragedy if their car had stalled.  O'Sullivan calmed him down and said, "That's why we never go to emergency until we see the fenders fly.  If we put the train into emergency every time one of these idiots pulls this stunt, either on purpose or through inattention, we would have the train in emergency on nearly every trip.  Eventually, our number would come up and we would have the train in a ditch, which could be devastating."
     It took over thirty minutes for the air to recover and for the dispatcher to give clearance for Willie to proceed to Summit.  On the way, he contemplated the valuable lesson he learned on his first day as a fireman on a diesel.

                                                                              (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-150220155143.jpeg)
                                                                                                         The Scene of the Emergency


                                                                                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dScQpUyTYTs

                                                                                                Crossing the Tahope Highway intersection Safely





                                                                             
   
   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 16, 2020, 10:42:53 AM
Those billboard reefers sure make a great looking train.....good tale Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on February 16, 2020, 11:07:02 AM
Great story your Honor.   :D  Also a really neat train.  Love those billboard reefers.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 16, 2020, 02:07:41 PM
Great tale Bill. Those darn teenagers.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 16, 2020, 02:37:07 PM
                                   THE REST OF THE STORY


If you think teenagers have learned anything since the 1950's, just look at this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyIW0r3-ruA
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 16, 2020, 06:10:19 PM
Hey Bill.....check out this video of choo-choo's and Spanky's first full movie.  ;D


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyhd7gSxAC0
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 22, 2020, 05:14:58 PM
Saturday Report - February 22, 2020.  Chilly 48 degrees at dawn, but sunny and mid 60's by noon.  Will warm back into the 80's tomorrow. 
   

 The A&S Board met early this morning.  The meeting started at 8:15 a.m.  There was a tour of the progress on the Tahope Pennensula and a discussion bout how the scenery will progress in that area. 
     The CEO was given a round of applause for his determination to begin painting and installing sound in brass engines, hopefully in the Spring.  Delivery was made of a coal hopper lettered for the NC&StL RR.  Those of you who follow this report will remember that the Pennsy provides the motive power for the once a month coal train into  Tahope in exchange for the Pennsy president's free pass over the road.  The coal train is powered by Baldwin Sharks.  The attached video gives testimony to the quality of the sound made by Baldwin diesels.  They are going to outclass EMD you know.  And Baldwin would never consider merging with Lima Locomotive Works.  But these diesels are just a passing fad.  Steam will triumph as soon as the efficiency improves and the cost of maintenance drops. 
    The coal train was the subject of most of the morning running.  The train originated in The Bottoms and negotiated the constant 1% grade of the Ovalix without breaking a sweat.  The train exited on the Midlands and performed a photo run-by before delivering a hopper or two to the Tahope Roundhouse Yard.  The train retuned to The Bottoms to await another delivery day.  At that point, an ACL P-3, Number 451 powered a six-car passenger train around the Midlands with stops at Sanlando and Piney Woods.

                                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojY9BlCQAQo&feature=youtu.be

                                     Here is a short video of the coal drag powered by Sharks.  Hear those Baldwin diesels rumble.

    "Reading Bob" Butts arrived around 10:30 a.m. and the crew departed for lunch at Smashburger's for lunch.  No Smokey Bones today.  We thought we would have a little variety.  Burgers were good.  We are likely to return.

    This week's story is taken from the October 1939 edition of Trains Magazine.  I often wondered where the cap railroaders wore during the steam era came from.  Now I know.  The true story originates with a fireman named George Kromer, whose friends called him "Stormy."  Stormy fired on the Chicago and Northwestern and one windy day the brakeman's cap blew off his head and it was lost.  The rest of the story happened sort of the way it is told below.



                                                                                                           The Railroader's Cap

    Sometimes it gets windy in February in Central Florida.  On one of those windy days, Diamond George Musselwhite, fresh off of his honeymoon with his new bride, Daffy, reported for work as the fireman on the Florida Special.  The Special was powered by one of the dozen R-1 4-8-4's, which were the pride of the ACL steam passenger fleet.  Diamond George climbed into the cab of the big R-1, ready to man the stoker.  The signal switched to a clear board and the Florida Special was on its way to Jacksonville. 
    As the train passed over the Great Divide, the wind blew through the cab with a mighty gust, blowing George's cap off of his head and into the chasm below.  Well, George was fit to be tied and had to fend off sparks and cinders for the rest of the trip. 
    When George returned to the roundhouse that evening, he set himself down at the crew table and said, "Boys, I gotta swell idea." 
    That evening he spoke with Daffy, saying, "I figure that by shaping some cloth and putting a sunshade on it, you could make a good strong cap that's not likely to blow off in the wind." 
    "Waal, maybe I could," said Daffy, who excelled at shop and auto mechanics in high school.  She found some heavy material that looked like mattress tacking and made a floppy cap with a bill and a springy sweatband that would not blow off in the wind.  The cap was big enough to where it could be pulled down over the ears in cold weather.  Diamond George proudly wore it to work the next day.
    The crew at the roundhouse admired the cap.  "Fatso" Johnson, the A&S engineer, said, "Now that is my idea of a cap.  I wunder if you could git your Missus to make me one?"  "Me too," said 'Tater" Cartwright.
    "Well, I'll see if she'll oblige," said George.
    The next day the crew all marveled at the caps Daffy made and all of them wanted one.  "If anybody but Diamond George had that cap, he'd make a million dollars," said the Maintenance Foreman, Will Fixer. 
    George was convinced he had an item that would be in demand, so he went to a garment factory in Orlando that manufactured uniforms for the state prison and asked if they would make the caps.  The owner said, "I don't see how you can sell more than a few dozen, but I'll make as many as you want to pay for at 25 cents each." "Fine," said George, "make a hundred dozen and I'll be back to pick them up next week." 
    George started selling the caps by wearing his in places like Sweaty Betty's Diner and eateries up and down the line from Tampa to Jacksonville.  In no time he had sold the entire order and needed more.  As time went by, the manufacturing site had to be moved to Nooo Yawk and orders of thousands of dozens of caps were manufactured and sold. Sure enough, George made his million dollars and those caps are still selling like hotcakes.
    And Daffy bought a brand new 1949 pick-up truck, complete with a "coon tail" on the aerial. 


 
                                                                                 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeO67oX0auU

                                                                                                        The Florida Special

                                                                (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-220220171011.jpeg)

                                                                                                  George "Stormy" Kromer

                                                                    (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-220220171306.jpeg)

                                                                                                       Stormy's Railroader's Cap
                                                                                     
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on February 22, 2020, 09:06:00 PM
I had forgotten to read last week's report during my siege at work.  Both wonderful stories, Bill.  And the videos are great, too.

Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 23, 2020, 09:27:16 AM
Amazing creation.....and she did it without duct tape & bailing wire.  ;D  Great story Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 23, 2020, 11:19:33 AM
These here stories just get better and better.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on February 23, 2020, 12:14:07 PM
Hats off to another great story Bill!   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 24, 2020, 07:24:57 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 29, 2020, 09:18:40 AM
Saturday Report - February 29, 2020.  Clear, sunny day in Central Florida.  High's in the 70's.

    This is the Saturday that The Babe goes to Mt. Dora for beauty treatment so there will be no formal Saturday Report.
    HOWEVER!  Please let this reporter congratulate Tom on his decision to start working on brass locomotives, even if it is part-time.  No one does it better and no one has more patience to do that tedious bit of true art work. 
    Additionally, this reporter would like to compliment those forum members who have been posting progress on their layouts and builds.  Outsiders do not realize the artistic talent it takes to be, as my Jaw-Ja cousins used to say, "at the top of the heap," in our hobby. 
   
    This week's story comes from the monthly Railroad Magazine, August, 1940 ($.15).  Imagine a railroad magazine without a single picture of a diesel locomotive, not even an advertisement.  Each month there is a section called "True Tales of the Rails," which are short stories that, with further compression, can be adapted to tales about the Atlantic & Southern Railroad.  This week's story is about a close call or two and is a reminder that railroading is a dangerous occupation. 

                                                                                                      BRUSHING THE PEARLY GATES

    it was cold and rainy that February morning back in the '30's when Charlie Miner climbed up into the cab of ACL 835 (a freight hog).  He was a new fireman, just in from a stint down south in Tampa, where he worked as a brakeman.  The engine was running light, backing from the roundhouse onto the mainline, awaiting the yard goat to couple the morning freight to the tender.
    The coal space in the tender of 835 needed about 8 tons from the coal tower in order to make the run to Jacksonville so Bobby Baker, the engineer, backed to the coal tower and gave 8 short blasts on the whistle to signal Ben, the coal tower tender, for 8 tons.  Bobby spotted 835's tender under the coal chute and Ben pulled the chain to release the coal. 
    At the same time, Charlie slipped on the tank's slick deck and fell head over heels into the coal space.  He did a 180 flip and landed on his feet about the time the coal was released.  He tried to pull himself free, but the coal was up to his knees before he knew it and he was held fast.  He hollered at Ben to close the coal chute and by the time Ben responded, he was up to his neck in coal.  The air was mostly coal dust and Charlie could barely breathe, much less move to free himself.
    Ben called to Bobby and said, "Hey! The Fireman's buried nigh up to his neck in the tank and we better dig him out before he smothers!"  Bobby and Ben commenced to digging to free Charlie when they heard a whistle in the distance.  The morning Florida Special was crossing the Grreat Divide and was heading for the rear of 835's tender. 
    "Damn," said Bobby, "I completely forgot about Number 4!" 
    The brakeman grabbed a red flag and hi-tailed it to the rear in an effort to warn the engineer of the oncoming varnish.  "You flag 'em and I'll beat it back to the shops in Tahope, said Bobby.  "You better twist her tail," hollered the brakeman, " or we're goin' to have one hell of a wreck!"
    In two leaps, Bobby made it back to the right-hand seat.  With the quick and sure touch of a born hogger, his hands released the brakes, slammed back the Johnson bar, opened the sanders, and yanked the throttle.  835's Stack and cylinder cocks hissed protest as she leaped forward into motion, but she didn't slip, and within five engine lengths was responding to the wide-open throttle.  She was making nearly 40-miles per by the time she reached the Ovalix and crossed into the Tahope Yard Lead.  Close behind, the Special missed 835's tender by only a few car lengths.
    Ben continued to dig Charlie out of the pile of coal and, by the time 835 regained track speed past the Big Tahope River Bridge, he was almost dug out.  The roundhouse crew carried Charlie into the roundhouse lounge to assess the damage.  Aside from numerous bruises, scratches, sore muscles and a thick coat of grime and coal dust, he was in pretty good shape.  After an examination by the railroad's physician, Dr. Staysic, he took a much-needed shower and spent the evening recounting his adventures with his buddies.
    Charlie continued as a fireman for some ten years and was promoted to the right side, but by then there was no more coal and Charlie came to work wearing a jacket and a white collared shirt to run his F3's.  But he never tired of telling about the day he nearly brushed the Pearly Gates - twice! 

                                                                     (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-290220092214.jpeg)

                                                                                            By the time Ben responded, he was up to his neck in coal!



                                                                         (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-290220094453.jpeg)

                                                                                                        The Sanlando Yard Water Tank
   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on February 29, 2020, 10:09:49 AM
Great story Bill!   :D  It also takes some artistic talent to weave terrific tales like this that really help bring a layout alive.   ;) 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on February 29, 2020, 10:28:36 AM
Enjoyed it Bill..... :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jimmillho on February 29, 2020, 10:45:29 AM
Outstanding story Bill.

Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on February 29, 2020, 03:41:34 PM
Love your stories Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on February 29, 2020, 05:29:38 PM
Bill,

Thanks for the vote of confidence. By the way, how many brass loco are up for painting?

Oh, great story also.

Tom  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on February 29, 2020, 06:40:26 PM
Bet old 835 would have accelerated in a more timely manner with Greg Speed at the throttle.  :D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on February 29, 2020, 09:54:42 PM
835 is in fact "old."  She has lasted many years longer than her 1"1 sister, a Light USRA MIke.  We don't allow Greg to run antiques like 835.  We're too afraid she would throw a main rod or jerk a lung.  And she's a hand bomber so speed is hard to attain.  But she can pull anything out of the goat can put together. 

Thank you for the comment.  I appreciate comments because they let me know people think I'm doing with these stories and the goings-on at the Atlantic & Southern.

Bill
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 01, 2020, 10:20:11 AM
Not to worry Bill.....a little TLC and a gentle touch will get ole' 835 to run like a 2 year old thoroughbred.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on March 01, 2020, 11:02:09 AM
Hey Bill:

As all have said above. Great story.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 07, 2020, 04:15:06 PM
Saturday Report -March 7, 2020 - Weather was 59 degrees earlier.  Now (3:00 p.m.) it's nearly 70 degrees and not a cloud in the sky.  A little breeze makes it goof for sailing or kites.

The Board of Directors met at 0830, as usual.  The recently leased Pennsy E units were sent to the shops at Ucita Yard for upgrades from whatever they have now to WOW sound.  Hopefully, they will have the conversion completed before next Saturday.

The POL train (petroleum, oil, and lubricants) that was spotted at the Midlands was returned to the Bottoms.  The ACL Champion, powered by three E7's (A-B-A) was backed out of the yard at the Bottoms for service on its regular schedule.  Unfortunately, backing full-length Walthers passenger cars, even on a 36" radius curve is less than satisfactory due to the physics of the forces involved and derails occur.  This movement was tried because the Champ was spotted behind another train on the storage tracks at the Bottoms.  We decided to try this movement because we thought it would be easier than moving the blocking train.  We will not make that choice again.  The plan for the Jacksonville Union Station at Summit provides for backing into the station, but the curve there is 54" and we have tried it several times with passenger equipment, always with success.

We ran the Camp all the way to Summit before lunch.  There was some minor troubleshooting along the way but the trip was generally a success.  Greg DeMayo arrived about 10:30 and we adjourned for lunch at a new (for us) Italian restaurant located in the same shopping center as Smokey Bones.  The Babe joined us and the food was excellent.  We will probably make this place a regular haunt.  We have eaten at Smokey Bones nearly every Saturday for over 10 years and it is time to branch out and spread the money over a wider variety of cuisine.

Thie week's story begins, I hope, several tales about passenger service in Florida and the Southeast during the 40's and 50's.  Since it has already been mentioned, we will begin with the ACL's Champion.  Things operated differently in the 40's and 50's and this description states it the way it was. 

                                                                                                                                 The CHAMPION

    The Atlantic Coast Line and the Florida East Coast purchased three complete sets of passenger equipment for a new streamlined passenger train in 1939.  The new trains were in response to the dieselized passenger service offered by the Seaboard Air Line's highly successful Silver Meteor that went into service from Florida to New York in 1938.  The ACL owned two of the sets and the FEC owned the other one. 
     The train's name came from names submitted by the public in a naming contest.  (It is claimed the fact that ACL's president at the time was named Champion McDowell Davis had nothing to do with the name's selection.)
    The 1939 version of the Champ was an all coach train with seven streamlined cars, manufactured by Budd, and composed of a baggage/dormitory/coach, a dinner, four coaches, and a tavern/observation car.  The train originated in two sections in Miami and St. Petersburg.  The FEC provided power from Miami to Jacksonville and the ACL provided power from St. Pete all the way to Richmond.  The train was powered from Florida to Richmond with a single ACL E3A unit.  The RF&P took over at Richmond and the Pennsy piloted the train from Washington, DC, to New York. The three sets of equipment allowed daily service.
    During the days of racial segregation, the baggage/dormitory/coach (22 revenue seats) were "reserved exclusively for colored passengers."  The two tables located close to the kitchen in the dining car were also reserved for colored passengers, separated from the rest of the diner by a curtain.  Colored passengers were not allowed in the observation/lounge car.  Segregation in train travel continued well into the 6o's, if not by law, by custom.  The "good old days" weren't so good for everyone. 
    Three of the coaches were designed to seat 60 passengers and the other coach sat 52 passengers and contained a room for the stewardess.  The tavern/observation car had no revenue seats. 
    The dining car was nationally known for it excellent cuisine and service.  The ACL's official cookbook had 144 different main dishes listed, not all of which were offered on all trains at all times.  Some of the dishes reflected the food available along the route.  Some favorite breakfast selections included poached eggs on corn beef hash with grits and homemade biscuits and omelet with creamed mushrooms and asparagus.  Both of these breakfasts, including coffee or tea, were $1.35 in 1950.  Orange juice was an extra $.15.
    One reason the Champ was an all-coach train was because Pullman refused to provide porters for sleepers not manufactured in the Pullman shops.  Later, after anti-trust litigation, the Pullman Company was broken up into a manufacturing company and an operating company.  By 1948, Budfd delivered sleepers for use on the champion, with Pullman porters, along with blunt-end tavern/observation cars that could operate in mid-train.  At that time the E3's were traded for E6A-B-A units and the train stretched from 7 to 18 and sometimes 21 cars.  The Pennsy and the RF&P chipped in for the purchase of the new equipment.
    Most railroads selected distinctive color schemes for their new diesels, and the Coast Line's president, Champ Davis, selected royal purple and silver for the ACL diesels.  These locomotives were perhaps the most recognized locomotives on the East Coast.  The basic scheme was copied in different colors by the RF&P and the NC&St.L. 
    The Coast Line's Champion had a long and successful career.  Its last run was when AMTRAK took over passenger "service."  Nowadays, there are no diners, no food service to speak of, and precious little of the old courtesy that was the trade-mark of passenger service in the 40's and 50's.   

                                                                                     
                                                                                   (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-070320162848.jpeg)

                                                                                                     The original E3A used to power the Champion


                                                                                       (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-070320163243.jpeg)

                                                                                         E6 504 A-B-A- Lash-up awaiting Champion Service in Richmond


                                                                                          (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-070320163537.jpeg)

                                                                                                     The Champion Departing Winter Park with two E7's.

                                                                                             (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-070320163954.jpeg)

                                                                                                 ACL 504 E6A at the Atlantic & Southern's Sanlando Station




Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on March 07, 2020, 05:29:28 PM
Bill,

Great history of the line. I think we should name one of the A&S RR trains, "The Tom"!

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on March 07, 2020, 05:35:23 PM
Another fine report and interesting story Judge. I enjoy getting caught up each week.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on March 07, 2020, 06:44:11 PM
Bill,
Another wonderful story and history lesson for the ACL and the A&S.
Thanks again for your continued efforts in providing this excellent series of short stories to bring Tom and your efforts on the A&S to life.
Much appreciated,
--Paul
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on March 07, 2020, 07:10:26 PM
"The Tom".  I like it.   ;)  Another great story to help bring the layout to life. 

Really sorry I missed the festivities today but the HOA wanted the driveway and sidewalks pressure washed.  Maybe (hopefully) next Saturday.  Now that the pressure washing is behind me I can treat myself to a good long workbench session tomorrow without feeling guilty about not doing anything around the house.   :D  The workbench is currently occupied by a background structure (Bar Mills Seckler's Cold Storage) destined for the Summit on the A&S so it does relate to this thread.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 08, 2020, 10:12:31 AM
That story brought back great memories Bill. I was on that train almost every summer, and a few Xmas holidays, from the early 50's till the mid 60's.

The food was terrific, especially breakfast, and I spent most of my time in between cars with the top half of the dutch door open and my head hanging out in the wind.

One of the reasons for my love of "Greg Speed" came from when the PRR GG-1's that were attached to the cars outside D.C.. When we were flying down a long straight section in MD or NJ, I was between cars and the conductor came by. I asked him how fast we were going and he said that the engines were limited, by the PRR rules, to 100 mph, but were capable of a good bit more. I said it looked to me that we were doing well over 110 mph and he just smiled and said "we may be a wee bit behind schedule".

Amazing that trains were going well over 100 mph over 60 years ago and today they are building a line from Miami to Orlando that they claim will be "high speed" as it will be doing 120 mph.....not much progress in all those years.....go figure. ???
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on March 08, 2020, 10:47:37 AM
Nice history lesson, Bill.  Interesting how the number boards changed from the E3 small nearly unreadable loco number to the large painted one on the E6, finally the large lighted ones on the E7.


Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 08, 2020, 11:50:39 AM
Jeff - The early FT's and the E3's and E6's had small number boards.  They painted the numbers on the nose of these engines so the numbers could be seen.  Another interesting bit of trivia is that the E6's did not have dynamic brakes because the height of the engine prohibited the installation of the equipment.  All of the E units had boilers for passenger operation.  That was not true with all of the F units, except, of course, with the FP7's.

Speaking of boilers, the NC&StL basically ran from Atlanta to Nashville.  The route was over the Tennessee Cumberland mountains.  As a result, the NC&StL bought no E units and relied upon F3's geared for freight duty to power passenger trains.  The F3A's did not have boilers, so there had to be a B unit in the consist to provide steam for heat and airconditioning.

And here is an interesting pic of a diesel boneyard.  Reminds me of the pics of steam locos awaiting scrap.  Whatever happened to the bells and whistles?

                                                                             (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-080320114831.jpeg)

                                                              What is this?  Well over 100 locomotives in a bone yard?  I wonder how much fuel is left in those tanks?
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 14, 2020, 05:24:21 PM
The Saturday Report - March 14, 2020 - Clear day, high in the high 80's.

The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours. 
The stockholders awarded the CEO and the Ticket Agent railroader's caps for service above and beyond the call for keeping the A&S solvent for another year.  (Photo below).

                                                                    (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-150320091045.jpeg)



The scratch building project of the South Tahope junkyard was inspected.  It is coming along nicely.  The newly repowered E7 A-B-A Pennsy diesels were tested and calibrated as per WOW Sound standards.  These units made a caboose hop from Summit to the Midlands where they picked up a mixed freight and were put through their paces.  Meanwhile, the Champion was returned to the Bottoms and the City of Miami (the subject of this week's story) was brought up to the Midlands for trial run.
Curt Webb and Greg DeMayo arrived and the crew adjourned for lunch.

After lunch, the City of Miami made a video run-by over the Suwanee River Bridge, but just as it came into sight a Florida thunderstorm passed through. 

This week's story is a description of the Illinois Central's City of Mimi passenger train.

                                                                                                             THE City OF MIAMI

The post-war demand for luxury passenger service from the mid-west (Chicago) to Florida (Miami) resulted in three streamlined passenger trains:  The City of Miami (), the Southwind, and the Dixie Flagler.  The latter two trains ran copies of the Budd equipment found on the ACL's Champion, while the equipment on the "City" was all Pullman Standard.  All three triains were originally all coach.  Only the "City" was dieselized all the way from Chicago to Miami.  The "City" was an Illinois Central train, but it had passenger cars pooled from the ACL and the FEC, all painted in the IC"s famous color scheme.


 (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-140320172810.jpeg) 
                                                                                                             (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-150320091854.jpeg)

The "City" began service in 1940 after being christened with water from Biscayne Bay and was a seven-car streamliner powered by a singel E6A.  An FEC engine powered the train from Miami to Jacksonville adn the IC took over from there to Chicago.  The consist included a baggage/dormitory car (Bougainvillea), four coaches (camellia, Jamponica, Hibiscus, and Poinsetta), a diner (Palm Garden) and a taver/observation lounge (Bamboo Grove).  Sleepers were added in 1949 as was an additional diner, an additional lounge car, and additional E units for motive power.

The original train could seat 254 passengers and operated a 30-hour schedule from Chacago to Champaign,IL, to Birmingham, AL, to Albany, GA, to Jacksonville.  A section was taken by the Coast Line from Jacksonville down through Gainesville to Orlando, Tampa, and St.Petersburg.  The train maintained an average speed of 50 MPH. 

The original "City" had one of the most flamboyant color schemes of any streamlined train.  The locomotive featured a large green wave with yellow pinstripes, separated from the orange-yellow body by a red pinstripe. The observation car, Bamboo Grove, had a large green stripe curving over the tail.  Each of the cars had a different color scheme of blue, coral, green, tan, copper, and yellow.  They were decorated with native wood.


                                                                        (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-140320163750.jpeg)


By 1950, the IC had gone through at least two more color schemes involving the familiar chocolate, orange and yellow colors.  The final scheme lasted until the train was discontinued by AMTRAK in 1971.  Today, there are no through passenger trains from Chicago to Florida.

                                                                    (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-140320173530.jpeg)

The Atlantic & Southern maintains a version of the City of Miami since it had a section that followed ACL tracks from Jacksonville through Orlando to St. Petersburg.  The two latest paint schemes are represented on the "City" as it passes through Tahope County.



                                                                                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja_N019jMGo 
                                                           The shows the "City" coming through Piney Woods in the next to last paint scheme                                               

                                                                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtEJ_EcqteQ&feature=youtu.be
                                                 This shows the "City" crossing the Suwanee River in a thunderstorm wearing the most familiar paint scheme.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: madharry on March 15, 2020, 05:30:54 AM
I love the videos and especially the thunder and lightning. The lighted cars are brill as well. Well done!
Mike
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 15, 2020, 10:39:16 AM
Great story about a great train Bill. I used to take the City of Miami from Ft. Lauderdale to St. Louis at the beginning and end of the school year at Mizzou.....what fun. All the coeds going and coming from school made for quite an interesting trip.  ::)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on March 16, 2020, 09:37:24 AM
Another epic Saturday with some of the SBG. We all had a wonderful time with the video.

Great friends, great food, great fun and lots more BSing.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 16, 2020, 10:47:38 AM
Another epic Saturday with some of the SBG. We all had a wonderful time with the video.

Great friends, great food, great fun and lots more BSing.

Tom  ;D


You betcha.....and the food was first rate....still wondering about the guys running around in funny hats. ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on March 16, 2020, 10:48:53 AM
Dang.  I missed it.

Another fine story Bill!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on March 16, 2020, 10:01:29 PM
Love the story and the video's - fine work my friends.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: sdrees on March 16, 2020, 10:33:40 PM
YOu are quite the videotographer Tom.  Always love your videos
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 21, 2020, 05:27:09 PM
Saturday Report - March 20, 2020 - Temperature in Central Florida - high 80's.  Not a cloud in the sky.

The Board of Directors declined to cancel the Saturday meeting due to the "the virus."   The meeting started on time and much time was taken up locating the passenger cars that the Pennsy K4s (which is in the shop for major overhaul) will eventually use for a train.  The mission was to prepare the cars for passengers and lighting.  Once the cars were located, the process of removing interior walls so the Walthers light bar will fit began and it took until after 10:00 to complete.  However, we now have six fine passenger cars and a reefer ready for service.  Yes, the Atlantic & Southern has Pennsy equipment.  It is a long story but the down and dirty version is the A&S leased a bunch of Pennsy equipment and locomotives to augment A&S power and we are going to run it occasionally to show it off.

We adjourned for a trip to the hobby shop and had lunch at our new hang out, which is a small Italian joint whose owner has decided to stay open in spite of the Governor's orders for all restaurants to close.  The crowd was scant and take-out is booming.  We decided to have our pic-nic inside instead of out in the heat.

                                                                                                          THIS WEEK'S STORY- RAILSPEAK
    Railroaders, like members of other trades and professions, have their own distinct terminology.  An article entitled "Lingo of the Rails" was published in the April, 1940, Railroad Magazine.  The article included a list of over 100 words and phrases in use during the steam era, along with a few examples of how the terms were used.  Some of the terms are familiar to model railroaders, others are not.  But since the readers of these stories are steam fans, or want to be, a few of the terms are listed for reader information and edification.
    There are entirely too many terms listed in the article to include here so the list has been "selectively compressed" to fit the reader's attention span.  All of the terms listed here are in common use by the employees of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad, although a few of them are usually preceded by descriptive adjectives not included.
    Before we embark on the journey through definitions, an example of railroad lingo was used in the 1940's comes to us by way of transcript of a jury trial that took place in the Tahope County Courthourse before Judge Elwin Thomas.  The event that gave rise to the litigation was a crossing accident on Eaton's Curve that involved car vs. train.  The issue was whether the engineer gave proper warning signal at the crossing.
    When asked to relate what happened, the brakeman testified as follows:
    "We wuz ordered for a train of diamonds, mostly high tents Summit to Sanlando.  The hog came through the hole ten minutes late, and the car knocker tied him on.  He tied him in the rubber, and then we tried the wind.  We got a high sign from the tent to get out of town, with the advice to whale them down the hill.  When we got down the hill we only hit the high spots until we got to the Piney Woods Station, where we sawed her off and gave her a drink. 
    Then we went down on sort time and the whistle pig sounded two longs, a short, and a long before we humped a man at Eaton's Curve."
    "Whoa," said the Judge.  "Just what language are you speaking?"  "Railroad," said the brakeman, "Everybody in Tahope speaks it."  "Well, get somebody to translate," said the Judge. 
    Sweaty Betty, the owner of the diner located south of the A&S steam service facility, offered to explain.  "The brakeman said, 'We were ordered to take a train of coal, mostly in big steel gondola cars from Summit to Sanlando.  The engine came through the passing track late and the car inspector coupled the engine to the cars and we tried the air brakes.  We got the go-ahead signal from the caboose and proceeded as rapidly as we could down the Ovalix to the Midlands.  When we got to Piney Woods, We uncoupled the locomotive and filled the tank with water. 
    'Then we made good time and the engineer sounded the crossing signal just before we hit the car on Eaton's Curve.'

    Here are a few of the words and phrases listed in the Lingo of the Rails article:
Ballast Scorcher - Speedy engineer
Bedbug - Pullman Porter
Bee Hive - Yard office
Big hole - emergency position of air brake
Bird cage - brakeman's lantern
Caboose - crummy, brain box, van, wagon, cage, buggy, chariot, crib, hack, hearse, palace parlor car, way car
Car catcher - rear brakeman (hind shack)
Conductor - Captain, skipper, brains, brainless wonder, swellhead
Dinky - Switch engine
Drag - Heavy freight train
Engineer - Big O, Big Ox, eagle eye , whistle pig, throttle jerker
Fireman - Ashcat, bakehead, tallow pot, bell-ringer, blackie, stoker, coal heaver, dust raiser, fireboy
Gate - Switch
Grease the pig - Oil around the engine
Hand bomber - Steam engine without a stoker
Jay rod - clinker hook
Jerk-by - a flying switch
Lightning slinger - telegraph operator
Lizzard scorcher - dinning car chef
Pull the pin - Uncouple a car or leave a job
Scrap pile - An old, worn out locomotive
Seashore - Sand used in the sand dome
Shack - Brakeman
Short time - Crew on overtime but not in violation of the limit of the hour law.
Spot - To place an engine or car in a particular place - a railroader would never uset the word "park" to describe the same thing
Skin your eye - Engineer's warning to the fireman on left side of the engine when approaching a curve.
Tie on - to couple to a car
Tin Lizzard - streamlined train
Whale, whale belly - a steel car
White ribbons - Extra train
Whiskers - A railroader with seniority
Widen her up - increase speed (also, pour on the coal).
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on March 22, 2020, 03:53:09 AM
Hey Judge:

WOW what a beautiful RR room. Layout looks just beautidful.

 Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 22, 2020, 04:15:16 PM
Another great one Bill.....so let's widen her up and wander into ballast scorcher territory.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: MAP on March 23, 2020, 06:09:51 AM
Great story Bill.  Always enjoy reading them!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 23, 2020, 06:34:14 AM
Karl, Greg, Mark - Thank you for your interest and your comments.  I appreciate knowing how my readers react to my stories.  Stay safe.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Oldguy on March 23, 2020, 08:46:51 AM
Another good one.  Kinda like the Saturday movie matinee serials as a kid.  They always left you with wanting to know what is next.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jrmueller on March 23, 2020, 10:20:47 AM
Bill - I too always look forward to your Saturday stories. Stay safe. Jim
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 28, 2020, 10:16:30 AM
Saturday, March 28, 2020.  Sunny day, the temperature will go up to 90 today.

There is no formal Saturday Report today.  The Coronavirus has kept the A&S directors hunkered down in their respective homes until further notice.

However, that does not mean the Atlantic & Southern Railroad has not been active.  If you have been following Tom's thread on the reconditioning and repainting of our Pennsy K4s you will see he is busy.  Meanwhile, your reporter is installing passengers in the Pennsy heavyweights the K4s will eventually pull over A&S trackage. 

There is a story this week.  it has to do with skullduggery on the railroad by a would-be professional thief of 1950 vintage.  I got the idea from a story in the February, 1941 Railroad Magazine.

                                                                                                      THE CASE OF THE LITTLE BLACK BAG

    One spring day in 1950, Officer Poovey of the City of Tahope Police Department received a complaint from a passenger, whose name was Joe Thompson, concerning theft of property.  It seems that while riding in a coach on the Champion, a gentleman had struck up a conversation with Mr. Thompson and had offered him a drink from an unopened bottle of whiskey.  The two men spoke about the events of the day and, suddenly, Mr. Thompson became quite drowsy.  He drifted off to sleep as the train pulled out of Union Station in Jacksonville and did not awaken until the conductor tapped him on the shoulder at the station in Sanlando.
    Officer Poovey immediately notified ACL's railroad detective, Sam Diamond, who, upon further investigation, found this kind of incident was happening all over the ACL system.  The M.O. was always the same.  A well-dressed gentleman wearing a homburg hat would embark on the train and find a seat in a coach.  HE would place his hat on the rack above the seat and place his little black bag beside him.
    About an hour before the train would arrive at a station in a major city, he would retrieve a cloth cap from his little black bag and move about the train wearing it.  He would look for a mark who appeared to be well dressed and sit next to him.  The two would strike up a conversation and soon the thief would remove a bottle of whiskey from his little black bag.  He would also produce an empty cup, into which he would pour a couple of fo fingers of whiskey.  he would then offer the cup to the unsuspecting passenger, claiming he preferred to drink out of the bottle.
    The unsuspecting passenger would drink the whiskey and become drowsy in short order.  While the passenger was napping, the thief would pick his coat pocket and return to his original seat.  When the train stopped at the next station, he would put on his bowler hat and disembark.  Thus disguised, he would make his getaway.
    Detectives Diamond enlisted the aid of Detective Smith and they concocted a stake-out plan.  They boarded the train in Richmond and kept their eyes peeled for the mysterious passenger with the bowler hat.  Sure enough, a man fitting the description boarded at Jacksonville and, after placing his bowler hat on the rack above, took a seat with his little black bag beside him.
    The two detectives watched his every move and waited patiently for the action to occur. 
    Soon, the thief retrieved a cloth hat from his little black bag and walked to the next car, looking for a mark.  The detectives followed at a safe distance and conversed in low whispers.  Diamond asked Smith, "How do you think he gets the mark to go to sleep?"  "Must be a Mickey Finn in the cup," said Smith. 
    The thief, true to form, opened his little black bag and pulled out a bottle of whiskey.  He poured a couple of fingers into his cup and offered it to the mark.  Smith was in favor of making their presence known at that time, but Diamond wanted to wait until the theft was completed. 
    The unfortunate passenger drifted off to slumberland about the time the train crossed the Tahope County line and the mysterious passenger got up and returned to his seat.
    At that point, the detectives put the cuffs on the thief and turned him over to Officer Poovey at the Sanlando Station. 
    A few days later, the thief was hauled before Judge Elvin Thomas.  He stated, "They got me cold, Judge.  I guess I'll plead guilty."  The prosecutor said, "Judge, this varmint done stole over $1000 from Mr. Thompson here and he needs to make res-ti-too-shun."  Scowling at the defendant, Judge Thomas said, "You got the money to make res-ti-too-shun?"  "Ain't got a cent, your honor." "Well," said the judge, " the first rule of how to be a successful thief is not to steal more than you can pay back.  Thirty months in prison." 
    And the case of the little black bag caper was solved.
                                                                   (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-280320104439.jpeg)
                                                                         
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on March 28, 2020, 10:49:40 AM
Great story Bill. Stay healthy butty.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on March 28, 2020, 11:01:32 AM
Thank you, Curt.  WOW! You read today's story before I got finished writing it.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on March 28, 2020, 11:03:28 AM
Wonderful story Bill!  Keep 'em coming and stay healthy!

The A&S has some activity going on up in Lake Mary as well.  My workbench is currently home to a structure that's destined for the Summit level of the A&S someday.  ;)

(http://modelersforum.com/gallery/56-280320105622-4366577.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on March 28, 2020, 11:03:43 AM
Thanks judge for keeping us smiling through all of this and what you personally must be going through now.
Your ever grateful fans.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 28, 2020, 11:22:56 AM
Loved this weeks story Bill..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 28, 2020, 11:23:54 AM
The storage building is looking good Bob..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on March 28, 2020, 12:25:16 PM
Another winner by His Honor. It reminds me of the ice caper when the porter was taking ice from the cadaver casket.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: bparrish on March 28, 2020, 01:09:28 PM
A question for you southeastern boys.

I grew up in Chicago and my dad worked the tariff offices for the Q from 35 to 81. In the early fifties, 53-55-57, we would take the train to Atlanta to visit my mom's older brother and my cousins.  Usually in the summer at the early end of July.

We took a coach out of Chicago and connected up to something going south at Cincinnati.  My recollection was that it was called the Royal Palm.  Who ran that train? Southern or ACL?

We always took coach as my dad didn't have a Pullman pass until he made management in the early 60's. 


Thanx
Bob
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on March 28, 2020, 02:34:47 PM
Bob,


This is the info  found:

From Cincinnati to Chattanooga - Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Pacific Railway

From Chattanooga to Atlanta - Southern's former East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia

From Atlanta to Jacksonville - Georgia Southern & Florida
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on March 28, 2020, 02:41:47 PM
A question for you southeastern boys.

I grew up in Chicago and my dad worked the tariff offices for the Q from 35 to 81. In the early fifties, 53-55-57, we would take the train to Atlanta to visit my mom's older brother and my cousins.  Usually in the summer at the early end of July.

We took a coach out of Chicago and connected up to something going south at Cincinnati.  My recollection was that it was called the Royal Palm.  Who ran that train? Southern or ACL?

We always took coach as my dad didn't have a Pullman pass until he made management in the early 60's. 


Thanx
Bob

Bob, 

In more modern times the Southern ran the Royal Palm from Cincinnati to Jacksonville with one of the stops in Atlanta. From Jax. south, the FEC ran it to Miami.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 04, 2020, 04:53:23 PM
Saturday Report - April 4, 2020

The fires are out and the roundhouse is dark today.  While the A&S is not running, the CEO is busy bossing the maintenance department in the matter of refurbishing steam engines.

    Your reporter had a weak story to tell today and, being a perfectionist, decided to take a chance and find a better topic. 

    He reached out and found the March 1940 edition of Railroad Magazine and, lo and behold, the story of the ACL Champion's first-run popped out from the middle of the issue.  The author was a writer for the magazine and managed to ride in the cab of the diesel from Washington, D.C. to some point south of Alexandria, Va.  A first-hand account of the whole trip is too long for this report, but the highlights can be "selectively compressed." 

                                                                                         The Champion's First Run - New York to Miami - 1939

                                                                                   (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-040420154948.jpeg)

   The Edward G. Budd Manufacturing Company built four practically identical sets of seven-passenger cars, two of which went to the Atlantic Coast Line for use on the Champion, and two of which went to the FEC.  One of the FEC sets was assigned to the Miami to Jacksonville Henry M. Flagler.  The other set, including motive power, went to pool service on the Champion.
    The original train's consist included a combination car, a dinner, four full-size coaches, and a tavarn-observation car.  The latter car was described as "possessing one of the most striking, and at the same time, tastefully arranged interiors as yeat achieved by any coach designer.  Since the entire rear end of the car is devoted to unrestricted lounging space, it is definitely a goodwill proposition as far as seat revenue is concerned." 

                                                              (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-040420164304.jpeg)

                                                                                     This must have been a publicity photograph. 
 
    The author described the motive power as a single diesel unit manufactured by GM's Electro-Motive Corporation.  "They are standard 2000 horsepower machines, similar to previous GM engines, but featuring the new Mars headlight.  As is more or less generally known, this device supplements the regular headlight, tracing a repetitious figure eight in advance of the locomotive as an arrestive warning to motorists adn pedestrians.  It may also be controlled by hand, and directed, for instance, to the inside of a curve, where normal headlight visibility is inadequate."  The ACL and the FEC pooled motive power and one of the FEC's red and yellow E-units provided power for the first trip from Washington to Miami. 
    The Champion's name was selected after a nation-wide contest won by Miss Bettsy Creighton, a Pittsburgh secretary.  Miss Creighton received a prize of $300.00 and two tickets on the Champion's first run to Miami. She also christened the train at Washington Union Station.  (This must have been sort of the 1939 version of "five minutes of fame.") 
    The Champ's December 1 "memorable first run" began at New York's Penn Station, pulling away from "a synthetic, but attractive setting of potted palms and drooping Spanish moss."  Passenger managers from the various railroads over which the Champion would travel attended the first-run ceremony, along with Edward G. Budd, himself, who beamed with pride at his company's latest masterpiece.  The departure was somewhat anti-climatical in that a Pennsylvania GG1 Electric hauled the train to Washington, where, for its formal dedication, the "FEC power coupled on for publicity photos."
    The ceremonies at Washington delayed the Champ's departure by six minutes, but ACL's Road Foreman of Engines, John Lewis, accompanied by N. J. Wash, the oldest in-service engineer on the RF&P eased her out of Union Station.  Wash had 48 years of service behind him and he bid on this run to make his first inspection run in a diesel cab. 
    The trip to Florida was somewhat eventful in that south of Alexandria, one of the two diesel prime movers "cut out for a matter of some moments while a slight operating adjustment was made.  (This was not unusual.  There were mechanical problems with the engines until the bugs were worked out.  A retired ACL engineer from Sanford told your reporter years ago that they used to couple up three E-units together, hoping at least two of them would remain operational.)   
    Miss Creighton was called upon to perform another christening on the Champ's first-run out of Miami.  The FEC handled the train on that trip too, but an ACL herald was pasted over the FEC herald on the red and yellow E-3 for the publicity photos.  (See photograph.)  ACL's purple and silver E unit took over at Jacksonville.

                                                                          (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-040420164118.jpeg)
                                                             Here is Betty Creighton christening the Champ in Miami.  Notice the FEC striping and the ACL herald.


    As time went by, the Champion added Pullman Standard sleepers and the train was divided at Jacksonville into the East Coast and West Coast sections.   Eventually, the FEC got out of the passenger business and the ACL brought the train from Jacksonville to south of Orlando, where it split into East and West sections at Auburndale.  Your reporter remembers the Champ, powered by three E-6's and 18 to 21 cars, coming through Orlando in the 1950s as numbers 91 and 92.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on April 04, 2020, 06:00:00 PM
Our first 7 months of marriage in 1972 were spent in an apartment in Springfield. VA backing onto the Southern Railroad's mainline. Southern didn't joint Amtrak, so each evening we'd get to see the Southern Crescent heading south and shortly before breakfast, the northbound train would pass. You could set timepieces on these schedules. I know this isn't ACL/FEC, but the memories of those trains is still great.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 04, 2020, 07:02:23 PM
Great history story Bill. Stay safe butty.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 05, 2020, 10:55:20 AM
Great history Bill.....I used to take the Champ from Ft. Lauderdale to New Jersey every summer and a few Christmases in the 50's and 60's.....great fun.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 11, 2020, 09:06:02 AM
Saturday, April 10, 2020

The Board of Directors of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad did not meet today due to the pestilence among us. Besides, after being confined to my residence for two weeks like a criminal on community control, I need a break from storytelling. 

I see from today's missive by Mad Harry that Pussy Galore has passed away at age 94.  She was the gorgeous blond adversary to Sean Connery's James Bond in the 1960's movie Goldfinger.  We should all mourn her passing.  I wonder if she ever got over that name?

Some of my followers (not from this forum) continue to send me humorous cartoons and videos, many of which I dare not share on this platform.  HOWEVER, humor can be found in even the direst adversity and I hope you will enjoy these examples in lieu of a story this week.

Stay safe - And stay home! 


                                                           (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-110420084754.jpeg) Bribe?


                                                            (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-110420083937.jpeg) 4 hoursemen


                                                                    (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-110420084407.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 11, 2020, 09:31:28 AM
Stay safe Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 11, 2020, 02:09:48 PM
Great humor Bill.....wonder if Tom was ever tempted to give a miscreant a pass for some TP?  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on April 12, 2020, 11:20:04 AM
Thanks for the laugh Bill!  Eileen and I both enjoyed them.  Our favorite was the four horsemen.   ;D  ;D  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on April 12, 2020, 11:43:01 AM
Reruns of Goldfinger have been on for the past week.

Honor Blackman was a beauty to the end.

(http://modelersforum.com/gallery/24-120420114241.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on April 12, 2020, 02:12:41 PM
We saw her on a British mystery TV show (Midsomer Murders?), very striking.  I don't remember if she was the bad guy.  :-)


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 18, 2020, 10:43:26 AM
Saturday, April 18, 2020.

There is no Saturday Report today due to the persistence of the pestilence.  That has not stopped progress on the Atlantic & Southern Railroad as can be seen by the photographs posted showing major maintenance on brass steam locomotives by President Langford.  If art is to be judged by both talent and experience, Tom ranks at the top when it comes to our hobby.

There is a story this week.  I have recently received a Kendle addition of a book written by a retired engineer who served 45 years on the SP.  The book has a wealth of tales about that railroad, many of which are not useful due to the lack of mountains, avalanches, and snow sheds on the A&S.  However, a few of the stories in the book gave me ideas to adapt to this platform.  Here is one of them.

                                                                                                               COLD STORAGE

    The City of Tahope has a two-man police department and a city jail composed of three cells, with an office for the jailer on the ground floor, and a residence on the second floor for the use of the jailer and his wife, who also doubles as the cook for the few prisoners who are ever guests of the management.
    The locks on the cell doors in the city jail are not functional and, like many small southern towns where everybody knows everybody, prisoners are on their honor to remain confined.  The prisoners are usually quite satisfied with this arrangement because they get "three hots and a cot," and the food is better than the Mulligan Stew served in The Bottoms.
    Newt Fisher (Luke and Tullula's boy)and his cousin Shortstack, were arrested for pilfering the A&S supply room of material they wanted to use to improve their lean-to located next to the Tahope River.  They found themselves spending the weekend in the city jail. 
    Newt had recently become unemployed after being fired from the job of baggage car watchman with the REA due to the unfortunate decomposition of a corpse after the ice was removed from the casket (Page 33- REA Iceman).  Shortstack, who is a "shiftless skonk,"was relieved from his duties as a brakeman after a "toilet situation" caused engineer "Uncle Henry" O'Leary to demand his termination from employment (Page 32 - First Day on the Job.)
    These two characters decided that another appearance before Judge Elvin Thomas would not be beneficial, so they planned their escape.  Both of these hardened misdemeanants had basic knowledge of railroad operations, so they decided to return to The Bottoms to collect their bindles and "nail a drag" to Jacksonville. 
    Long about dusk, they heard the sounds of a steam engine and, sure enough, a train of empty reefers crept towards the yard throat.  The train stopped so the brakeman could throw the king switch and our heroes took the opportunity to climb atop one of the reefers.
    In 1950, there were still a lot of reefers in service that did not have mechanical refrigeration.  These reefers had ice compartments located at each end of the car.  The ice kept the interior of the car cold so perishable freight, such as vegetables and citrus, could be shipped to points "up Nawth."  The doors on thee cars were always locked, but the ice hatches on the roof were propped open when the cars were empty to allow air circulation. 
    Newt and Shortstack crawled into the open hatches on their selected reefer and prepared for a ride to Jacksonville.  They stuck their heads out of the hatch openings and enjoyed the spring air while the train climbed the Ovalix to the yard at Summit.  Once in the yard, they ducked down to avoid detection. 
    The train stopped in the yard and our two vagabonds heard disturbing noises and accompanying activity.  The train had stopped next to the icing platform and workers began to shove 50 lb. blocks of ice into the reefer hatches.
    Luke and Shortstack made a quick exit from their hiding place right into the arms of the A&S Police, who escorted them back to the city jail. 
    The next day, Judge Thomas took the bench and bit off a chaw of terbacky before addressing the two defendants.  "Waal," said the judge, "boys, my patience with you two is a-growin' mighty short.  You best not come back to my court again.  Sixty days."
    Luke said, "Thank you, your honor. we'uns won't be back, ah kin guarantee."
    Shortstack, who didn't know any better, said, "Hey, Judge, how about a suspended sentence?"
    The judge, who could make a spittoon ring almost 100% of the time, told the bailiff, "Take these two to the Pokey before I change my mind."

                                                                                   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLk50mPWfbU&feature=youtu.be
               
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on April 18, 2020, 11:59:45 AM
Great to hear from you your Honor!  Great story too.  ;) 

Stay safe while we wait out this pestilence.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on April 18, 2020, 12:44:42 PM
Great story Judge!  I could use a good book to read - can you pass along the title and author of the book you referred too?
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 18, 2020, 07:03:56 PM
Great story.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: madharry on April 19, 2020, 04:44:47 AM
I agree great story Judge.

We saw her on a British mystery TV show (Midsomer Murders?), very striking.  I don't remember if she was the bad guy.  :-)


dave
Dave she was the villian. Heads up. It is always the biggest star who is the bad guy in Midsomer Murders............
Mike
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 19, 2020, 06:25:54 AM
John et al.  The book I referred to in this week's story is entitled 45 Years of True Railroad Stories by John Cockrell.  I bought it on Amazon as a Kindle edition.  Good stories by a guy who started with steam and worked up to second-generation diesels.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 19, 2020, 09:21:21 AM
Another good one Bill..... :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 25, 2020, 04:31:19 PM
Saturday Report - April 25, 2020

The Board of Directors of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad decided that the Governor of the State of Jaw-Ja and certain evangelical preachers are right and everyone else is wrong, so the Board met this morning at 8:30 a.m., always exercising social distancing and bathing our hands in (but not drinking) hand sanitizer. 

The morning was exciting.  The repainted and reworked Pennsylvania K4s and the B&O E-23 2-8-0 were debuted and they are beautiful things to watch.  Naturally, good things don't always act like they are "ready-to-run" so a couple of glitches prevent the showing of the planned videos.  Maybe next week. 

We ran the E-23 around the track at Summit and then sent it down the Ovalix to the Midlands.  The engine performs well and runs with no glitches in its get-along.  There may be a problem with the "Keep-Alive" capacitor and that will be investigated this week.  The K4s may have a defective decoder.  That issue will also be investigated this week.  In this day of computer technology, nothing runs right out of the box.

We had a pic-nick lunch in the roundhouse and then tested the recently acquired Pennsy Brunswick Green E7's on a heavy freight train.  Man, those babies do growl!

This week's story was derived from a tale told in a book named With the Slack, That will Do, and Other Railroad Stories.  The book is writtent by a former railroader on the Grand Trunk and Western who saw service on a number of roads due to mergers and transfers.

                                                                                                           Sanlando Oil Disaster

    It was a typical early predawn summer day in Central Florida, not a cloud in the skies, and by 6:00 a.m. the temperature was already approaching 80 degrees.  Ethan Douglas, an engineer recently hired on by the A&S from the B&O, fireman Wayne Shoemaker, Conductor Melvin Hatter, and head shack Bud Millstone, were called  for 5:59 a.m. to take the switcher assignment in Sanlando Yard.  This assignment usually meant making up the local freight train and servicing the Pure Oil facility and nearby industries.  It was an easy way to make a full day because there was a tree-hour interval between the morning activities and the arrival of the afternoon freights from Tampa and Jacksonville.
    The Pure Oil facility had two full tank cars spotted next to the fuel rack that needed to be moved and replaced with two empties.  Engineer Douglas eased switcher 1150 into the two full tankers and Millstone climbed down to connect the air hoses. 
    None of the crew noticed a fuel truck, driven by Lou Paul "Wormy" Thrasher, parked next to the first loaded tank car.  Wormy, who had just gotten the job as a driver for Tahope Oil and Gas Company, had been told by his boss to park his truck next to the fuel rack and fill up his truck with fuel oil.  Wormy's boss assumed he had the good sense to wait until the tank cars were moved before attempting to transfer the fuel.  Wormy, who has a few cubes short of a full tray, ran the hose from the fuel spigot under the lead tank car instead of from the fuel rack and began filling the tank on his truck.
    About that time, Engineer Douglas backed 1150 up to clear that spur for empty tank cars.  As the tank cars moved back, the force pulled Wormy's hose from the intake valve on his truck and flammable fuel spewed out all over Wormy and Millstone.  Conductor Hatter saw the emergency and skedaddled to the yard office to call for medical assistance. 
    An ambulance arrived on the scene within minutes and loaded the oil-soaked men onto gurneys for transport to the hospital.  On the way, Wormy said to Hatter, "Do yuh think we's gonna die?"  "I dun think so, but we might," said Millstone.  "Waal," said Wormy, why don't we get the driver to stop by the Trackside Tavern so we can have a last cool one and watch Maggie Hussy wiggle and jiggle?  Then we can die happy."  "Maybe after we've been cleaned up," said Millstone. 
  Our heroes arrived and the hospital without further incident, and underwent a thorough cleaning, followed by an examination by Dr. Minnie Staysic, who pronounced them fit for duty. 
    MIllstone retuned to Sanlando Yard to finish his daily assignment.  Wormy returned to the Tahope Oil and Gas Company and was asked for an explanation of the morning events.  The boss decided the problem should be chalked up to inexperience and let Wormy off with a strong warning.  Wormy, who was still shook up over the whole thing, took the rest of the day off and, before returning to The Bottoms, stopped by the Trackside Tavern for a cool one.

                                                                         
                                                                           (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-260420093204.jpeg)


                                                                            (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-250420162446.jpeg)



                                                                           
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on April 25, 2020, 05:14:58 PM
Great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 25, 2020, 07:02:01 PM
Those Bottom's boys strike again.....fun story Bill.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 26, 2020, 09:13:04 AM
Curt and Greg - Thank you for your kind comments.  My fan club consists of less than ten patient souls who follow my missives enough to comment.  We could all meet and have dinner without violating the virus guideline.  Of course, we could always travel to Jaw-ja and exercise our right to get infected. . . . .

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 26, 2020, 09:30:41 AM
Hey Bill.....how about Savannah? Pegi and I really like the town.....great restaurants, fun nightlife and Gulfstream Aerospace....what's not to like.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 26, 2020, 09:55:05 AM
Mike (Mad Harry):  Being British and all, you might not get the irony of having an industry known as "Valley Supply" located next to Sanlando Yard. (See photograph above.) The industry is named after Florida's famous St. Johns River Valley, which is located in Central Florida at the point where Seminole, Volusia, and Brevard Counties connect.  Of course, being Florida, the St. Johns River flows north and the sides of the St Johns River Valley are at sea level.  Some people from outside the state, mostly Yankees, mistake the valley for a swamp.

Just thought you'd like to know.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on April 26, 2020, 11:03:04 AM
Another great story Bill!  Keep 'em coming.  Glad to see that the A&S is pushing through this pestilence and the Bored of Directors haven't lost their sense of humor.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on April 26, 2020, 01:25:50 PM
Great story but then I had a little preview knowledge of w\hat was coming.

The issue with the PRR K4s was the fact the WOW decoder has a intermittent sound. It may be one that got past quality control.  I'll call TCS Monday and talk to Dan about it. I'm hoping they will answer.

Tom   ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on April 26, 2020, 02:48:12 PM
Hey Judge:

Looks just great.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 26, 2020, 02:57:28 PM
Thank you, Karl. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on April 26, 2020, 03:15:15 PM
Bob - Thank you for noticing we haven't lost our sense of "humor."  I have always tried to keep it light.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on April 26, 2020, 03:57:20 PM
Atta Boy Bill..... :) :) :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 02, 2020, 03:48:08 PM
Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report May 2, 2020.

The Board of Directors, every one of them fearless and unafraid of the pestilence in Tahope County, met promptly at 0830 hours.  Your reporter took note of the progress of the out shopping of the new 2-6-6-2 and both directors discussed the aches and pains of climbing over the 70-year mark.  Your reporter will turn 77 this week and the CEO (Tom) is much younger. 

Speaking of the C&O H-5, we had to do a little searching for decals for the engine.  Microscale has C&O decals so buying a set from them was an option.  However, it turns out that Tom had a set hidden away in one of his drawers and, although they appear to be more than 30 years old, they seem to be in good shape. 

We decided to give the K4s another run to see if we could adjust our way out of what we thought was a faulty decoder.  To our amazement, the Pennsy pacific improved over time and, once the chuff rate was adjusted, it performed fairly well.   The TCS capacitor that is called "keep-Alive" may be faulty.  Tom is going to replace it this week if he has a chance to get to it and we will retest the K4s next Saturday. 

Meanwhile, the K4s was coupled onto a reefer, a baggage/RPO, and four coaches for a test run.  It climbed up the constant one-degree grade of the Ovalix from the Midlands to Summit without difficulty.  Beautiful train.  We need to figure out a name for it. The train is scheduled to make a daily run from St. Petersburg to Jacksonville and back - sort of a daylight express.  The entire train was leased from the Pennsy due to increased traffic on the A&S.  As regular readers know, the A&S has a "special relationship" with the Pennsy and that road has leased or made gratuitous transfers of several still serviceable steam locomotives and a number of E and F units.  The A&S has granted trackage rights for a winter section of the Broadway Limited and that train makes regular trips down South to Central Florida.  All readers are invited to submit a suggested name of names for the train.  First prize will be a complimentary ticket to ride on the inaugural run, which is set for a week from today.

Lunch was take-out from our new Italian restaurant.  Pizza for your reporter and salad for Tom. 

Afer lunch, we reset the CV's on all four of the recently acquired Pennsy E-7 diesels and lashed them up with a fifteen-car freight.  That may have been a little overkill since all four units are powered, but they sounded great and looked even better.  There will be photos of all this next week unless the Tahope River rises.  And that is unlikely this time of year.  It doesn't start raining every afternoon here until late May, in time for the tourists to visit "Diddy Wurld." (Or not, this year.)

This week's story has military implications.  Ever wonder what happened to army supply sergeants when they retired?

                                                                                                     Property Management on the A&S

Billy O'Donnell was an army supply sergeant during the war and knew a thing or two about keeping track of equipment.  He is the A&S property manager.  He has a large wooden storage shack full of property located near the water tower at Sanlando Yard, and he carefully guards the contents.  Each section foreman is supposed to have two acetylene torches.  O'Donnell had an inventory of three. 

Benny O'Toole is the section foreman for the Sanlando Division and he was short a torch.  So, he asked O'Donnell for one of his.  O'Donnell said, "Billy, me darlin', it's a torch ya need?  Do ya only need th' one?"  "Yes, Benny me boy, the one is all I needs."  O'Donnell replied, "Ya can't have one."  "Why not, said O'Toole, yu've got three."  "Because then I'd only have two."  "But ya don need three," said O'Toole.  "And what if one of them wore out or got stole," said O'Donnell, " then I'd only have two and I'm not about to be taking that kind of a chance with railroad equipment." 

Only retired army supply sergeants (and it doesn't matter which army) could appreciate that logic.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on May 02, 2020, 05:18:13 PM
Sounds like military supply to me.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: cuse on May 02, 2020, 05:22:37 PM
Nice one Judge. Sgt. O'Donnell sounds a bit like my father's WWII experience. He came home as a Master Sgt. but spent a good part of his time running the show as a Supply Boss. Now that I think about it, they probably had to promote him out of there to restore equilibrium...I have no doubts his inventories were suspect and the back door was probably open to his buddies. Entrepreneurial.  ;)


I'll get down there one of these days when they blow the all clear...the real one!


John
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on May 02, 2020, 05:38:00 PM
Only I would notice this (at 78, I can legally be a DOM), but about those C&O decals? I hope they weren't really stored for all this time in Tom's drawers. That could have been awkward in a lot of situations.  ::)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 03, 2020, 09:03:09 AM
Sounds like a good time was had by all.....good tale Bill.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 03, 2020, 11:21:26 AM
The story about the supply sergeant has been told in a number of books and other media.  I first heard it on a segment of MASH when a quartermaster major refused to give Hawkeye an incubator because then he would only have two.  This guy was sending home an army jeep a piece at a time. 

I spent a miserable six weeks at ROTC summer camp at Ft. Bragg, NC in 1964 and I remember the inspection of the company areas.  The supply sergeants were transferring food trays and other items from one company storeroom to another, just ahead of the inspectors. 

Just my luck, my first duty station was back at Ft. Bragg.  I was assigned to be officer of the day one weekend for the Eighteenth Airborne Corps and Fr. Bragg.  Elements of the 82nd Airborne Division made a jump that morning and went to downtown Fayetteville that evening to let off steam.  They invaded a bar, tore up all of the tables and chairs, and set the place on fire.  I made the report, the army paid for all of the damage, and no disciplinary action was taken.  Boys will be boys.
 
While I was in Vietnam, the only beer available for several months was Carlings Black Label.  It seems that a group of sergeants had figured out how to make a bunch of money by giving Carlings a monopoly.   

 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on May 03, 2020, 11:35:12 AM
Thanks for another pleasurable read.   ;) 

Someday we'll be able to resume more normal activities on the A&S.  I'd like to try out the new Italian joint you two have found.  Meanwhile I'll have to contribute remotely.   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on May 03, 2020, 01:03:55 PM
Ah, Fayette-nam, I heard lots of stories about that place in the late '60s/early '70s.  By the time I got to ROTC Summer Camp in summer of '77 it had calmed down a bit.

I'm generally not a fan of domestic lager, but Carling has a spot in my heart.  I was on the Bicentennial reenactment of the Arnold invasion of Canada (fall of '75).  One of the sponsors was Carling/Labatte.  For a week, our routine was:  break camp, throw our stuff in the back of Maine National Guard 2 1/2 t trucks, they'd throw in a couple of cases of Carling to help us on the trip.  (You didn't want to get too close to the back of the truck, that was recycled beer that was getting dumped out the back of the truck...)  We'd arrive at the next town, set up camp, change into our colonial clothes, march and fire off some blank rounds from those of us who had muskets (mine was an 1816 Springfield).  Then it was free food at the Elks Lodge and open bar at the VFW.  When we got to Quebec City, there were double-decker busses to take people to the Labatte brewery, where this one woman would demonstrate how she poured 3 beers with one hand.  We all gave her plenty of chances to practice....

dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 03, 2020, 04:58:45 PM
Ah, the pleasures of youth! 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on May 04, 2020, 08:41:42 AM
I need to share this fact about the Judge and his story.

We have three NWSL brass USRA 0-6-0 locos. Two are sounded and painted. I suggested we sell the unpainted one.

Yepper, he said, "But then we will only have two".

True story and facts.

Tom 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 04, 2020, 08:45:27 AM
And I thought I was bad when it came to steam engines..... :o
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 09, 2020, 03:05:46 PM
Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report - May 9, 2020

The business meeting of the Board of Directors started on time at 0830 hours.  Weather - beautiful.  Too bad our visitors aren't here to enjoy it.  But the traffic is much better because of it.  Y'all come, ya heah!  We need the revenue.

The meeting started with gawking at the disassembled C&O H-5, which should be operational next Saturday.  Happy Days!  It needs to go into revenue service as soon as possible.

There were odds and ends to talk about.  The CEO has decided to refurbish our newly acquired 4-6-0 after the H-5 is finished.  That little engine will be a good match to the B&O Consolidation already in service.  Today we put the 2-8-0 through the Ovalix test and she pulled 12 cars and a caboose up the steady one percent grade with no difficulty.  At speed step 35, she takes 2 minutes and 2 seconds to make a revolution on the ovalix.  About 13 minutes from the Midlands to Summit.

A curved turn-out at the south end of the railroad near the diesel service facility is faulty.  It will be replaced within the next few weeks.  That is quite a project, but the results will be worth it.

We ran a freight behind the four Pennsay E-7's.  Those four units could probably pull well over 100 cars without difficulty.  Later we reduced the consist to an A-B-A lash-up.  Still overkill, but it looks better.

Bob Butts and Greg DeMayo showed up for fun and lunch.  Always good to see those guys.

Last week your reporter challenged all who follow this report to name the train to be powered by a Pennsy K4s with five passenger cars and an express reefer on its daily run from St.Petersburg to Jacksonville and back.  Many suggestions were expected and exactly zero were received.  i guess the virus is getting to imaginations.  We settled on calling it The Jacksonian, after President Andrew Jackson, who was, after all, the first territorial governor of Florida and the dude for whom Jacksonville is named.  Poor Andy, they are talking about taking his likeness off of the $20.00 bill.  But he will be remembered on the A&S!  Shouldn't only former presidents have their likeness on U.S. currency? 

There will be no story this week or next.  Your reporter is taking some time off.  There is a photo!  Below is the H-5 in its disassembled condition.


                                                                             i(http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-090520151042.jpeg)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on May 09, 2020, 03:56:42 PM
Wish I could of been there today. Hopefully next week.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on May 10, 2020, 03:45:48 AM
Hey Judge:

Always looking forward to your reports.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Raymo on May 10, 2020, 07:49:58 AM
Glad you boys could at least get together for a little face to face time.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 10, 2020, 08:44:24 AM
It was great fun.....greatly missed with the government mandated separation baloney.  :( :) ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on May 10, 2020, 11:00:51 AM
I was glad to have the opportunity to drop in and catch up on the progress on the A&S.  A good time was had by all I believe.   :D 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 10, 2020, 11:09:55 AM
Bob, Curt, Greg, Karl, and Raymo - Thanks for following my reports and for stopping by on this beautiful, sunny, Sunday morning.  My goal for today is to do nothing and rest afterwards.

OHE
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on May 10, 2020, 03:58:09 PM
Judge


Good report and it's good to hear you guys got together and run the railroad. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on May 10, 2020, 04:08:50 PM
We had a great time Saturday morning. We kept our distance but then again we didn't. Bob delivered Seckler's Cold Storage and it looks fantastic. Really, the picture doesn't capture the very fine details and the stucco is the best I've ever seen.

The Judge mentioned a problem area with a turnout. For several op sessions we have had issues with it. The offending turnout is a Walthers Shinohara #8 left curved turnout and is one I used on the old layout. It will be replaced and the track rerouted for smoother running.  More on this on my A&S build thread.

Tom  ;D

(http://modelersforum.com/gallery/24-100520160202.jpeg)


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: tct855 on May 10, 2020, 04:45:52 PM
What an awesome structure! Many cool angles and time additions, can't wait to see it someday in person? or in some really cool videos?  :o   Thanx Thom...
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on May 10, 2020, 08:09:45 PM
Beautiful structure. Bob really outdid himself. I hope to see it in person soon.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Bruce Oberleitner on May 10, 2020, 10:14:40 PM
Wow!  That sure looks beautiful!  I hope you have a great place on the layout to put that baby.

The Diet Pepsi Kid

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: sdrees on May 10, 2020, 10:51:13 PM
WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  Bob did a great job on this structure.  It is a very interesting building.  Tom, you are one luck man.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on May 11, 2020, 01:34:25 PM
Thank you all for the kind comments on the Seckler's build.  Much of the credit goes to the gang at Bar Mills for creating such an interesting structure.  All I did was slap a little paint on it and glue it together.   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 16, 2020, 04:59:09 PM
Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report May 16, 2020

Beautiful day in Central Florida.  Traffic has picked up now that staying in place has been somewhat relaxed.  I guess the citizens are exercising their freedom to get infected, Orange County being the most infected county in Central Florida.  To each his own.  Your reporter et ux (wife mate) are staying in place except to attend Saturday sessions of the A&S and grocery shopping. 

The Board of Directors met a little early at 0820 hours.  The agenda included the procurement of new A&S decals to replenish our fading stock.  Fortunately, a source has been found and contact will be made at the first of the week.
 
The new curve at the South End of the railroad next to the Ovalix was inspected and tested.  It is a beauty and is a needed improvement over the old track plan. 
We decided to run the Jacksonian (Powered by a Pennsy K4s with five passenger cars and two front end cars.  This engine and equipment were leased from the Pennsy in "still serviceable" condition for $1.00 a year to provide daily local service between Jacksonville and St.Petersburg and back.)  The A&S video team decided to memorialize the run and, after a glitch or two, a successful run-by was captured as the train pulled into the Tahope spur.  The video is attached to this report. 

Just prior to the video run-by, Greg and Curt stopped by and stayed for lunch.  Greg took the throttle to the ACL ten-wheeler and played catch-up to the B&O consolidation freight that was ahead of it.  This conduct has got to stop.  While it is true that a passenger ten-wheeler can outrun a consolidation, it is not true that tailgating and blowing the whistle will make the consolidation "pull over" on a one-track mainline. 

Lunch was at our new Italian venue, which is named Del-Dio's, I think. 

After lunch, a brace of E-7's pulled freight at Summit and we brought out our ACL 2-10-2 for a test run around the new curve.  No problem there.  The 2-10-2 was acquired during a stop at Howard Zane's house on our way to Scranton for a model railroad convention. several years ago.  The engine was completely refurbished in the A&S shops and repowered with WOW Sound.  The ACL only had a few of these USRA-copied beasts and these engines were the only Coast Line steamers equipped with Vanderbilt tenders.  I am told that these engines were true drag freights that seldom exceeded 35 mph.   

There will be no Saturday Report next Saturday.  The Babe is going to get a hairdo in Mount Dora.  Hopefully, a new story will accompany the Saturday Report two weeks from today. 


                                                                             https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWfk5ePkqs0&t=15s
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on May 16, 2020, 05:24:49 PM
Bill,

Very nicely reported and we did have a lot of fun this fine day.

Thank you for your efforts on the Saturday Report.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 16, 2020, 06:02:45 PM
I'll second that.....a good time was had by all.....except for the persnickety movie director.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on May 16, 2020, 06:53:25 PM
Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report May 16, 2020

Beautiful day in Central Florida.  Traffic has picked up now that staying in place has been somewhat relaxed.  I guess the citizens are exercising their freedom to get infected, Orange County being the most infected county in Central Florida.  To each his own.  Your reporter et ux (wife mate) are staying in place except to attend Saturday sessions of the A&S and grocery shopping. 

The Board of Directors met a little early at 0820 hours.  The agenda included the procurement of new A&S decals to replenish our fading stock.  Fortunately, a source has been found and contact will be made at the first of the week.
 
The new curve at the South End of the railroad next to the Ovalix was inspected and tested.  It is a beauty and is a needed improvement over the old track plan. 
We decided to run the Jacksonian (Powered by a Pennsy K4s with five passenger cars and two front end cars.  This engine and equipment were leased from the Pennsy in "still serviceable" condition for $1.00 a year to provide daily local daily service between Jacksonville and St.Petersburg and back.)  The A&S video team decided to memorialize the run and, after a glitch or two, a successful run-by was captured as the train pulled into the Tahope spur.  The video is attached to this report. 

Just prior to the video run-by, Greg and Curt stopped by and stayed for lunch.  Greg took the throttle to the ACL ten-wheeler and played catch-up to the B&O consolidation freight that was ahead of it.  This conduct has got to stop.  While it is true that a passenger ten-wheeler can outrun a consolidation, it is not true that tailgating and blowing the whistle will make the consolidation "pull over" on a one-track mainline. 

Lunch was at our new Italian venue, which is named Del-Dio's, I think. 

After lunch, a brace of E-7's pulled freight at Summit and we brought out our ACL 2-10-2 for a test run around the new curve.  No problem there.  The 2-10-2 was acquired during a stop at Howard Zane's house on our way to Scranton for a model railroad convention. several years ago.  The engine was completely refurbished in the A&S shops and repowered with WOW Sound.  The ACL only had a few of these USRA-copied beasts and these engines were the only Coast Line steamers equipped with Vanderbilt tenders.  I am told that these engines were true drag freights that seldom exceeded 35 mph.   

There will be no Saturday Report next Saturday.  The Babe is going to get a hairdo in Mount Dora.  Hopefully, a new story will accompany the Saturday Report two weeks from today. 


                                                                             https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWfk5ePkqs0&t=15s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWfk5ePkqs0&t=15s)


Say it isn't so!
And the packies in the Keystone State won't be opened within the next 2 weeks. What's a faithful reader to do after 8 weeks of quarantine?
PS: Neither the missus nor I have had our hair done in the last 8 weeks. Just sayin'.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on May 16, 2020, 06:54:17 PM
Had a great time today. I think Greg was driving that loco like a snowbird. Just saying....
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on May 17, 2020, 03:17:29 AM
Hey Tom:

WOW!!!! Bob did A beautiful job on Seckler's cold storage.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 17, 2020, 09:17:47 AM
Had a great time today. I think Greg was driving that loco like a snowbird. Just saying....


Et tu Webb..... ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 17, 2020, 09:56:59 AM
Karl - Bob Butts is not a modeler.  He is an artist!  His work is always beautiful and the A&S is fortunate to have several of his builds.

BandOGuy - My wife (Cindy) went to CVS and purchased an electric hair trimmer (like the ones barbers use that go buzzzzzz).  My hair does not need scissors and Cindy has become my barber.  Should have done that years ago.  My hairstyle reminds me of the haircut I got my first day in military school.  Everyone should join in and end the barbershop conspiracy. 



   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on May 17, 2020, 12:00:01 PM
Greg :) :) ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on May 31, 2020, 03:56:07 PM
Atlantic & Southern Railroad - Belated Saturday Report for May 30, 2020.

My apologies to all three of my readers for submitting this week's report a day late.  My wife, Cindy, bless her heart, she's as sweet as South Jaw-ja tea, had some other ideas for my Saturday afternoon.

The Board of Directors met on time at 0830 hours.  Much was discussed.  The CEO has found a source for custom decals and we decided that the logo should be a diamond shape with A&S inside it just like the AB&C diamond.  We will also need decals reading "Atlantic & Southern" for boxcars and other rolling stock.  Most railroads have slogans or company sayings on their equipment.  Your reporter was tasked with the responsibility to make recommendations.  At first, cutesy slogans having a reference to swamps were considered, including some character like Pogo, but that idea was scrapped due to the seriousness of the management and staff of the A&S.  Next, the idea of a description of Central Florida was considered.  Since we are both former Gators, a line from the University of Florida's Alma Mater invoking Palm and Pine was discussed.  Later it was decided that referring to a Florida sounding passenger train would be less subtle and The Palmland Route was put on the  agenda next week for further discussion.  Any suggestions would be duly considered.

The post-meeting session was quite exciting.  The C&O H5 2-6-6-2 was given a maiden voyage and the A&LM 4-6-0 was also tested.  The H5 "had a screw loose" on the main crank, but it was a quick fix.  It pulled a string of 28 coal hppers and a caboose without any problem on level track, but needed a helper to climb the Ovalix to Summit.   This engine is not a speedster.  It took over 15 minutes for it to make six 26' rotations up the Ovalix.

The 4-6-0, number 35, is more of a horse than expected.  The mayor of the City of Tahope, the sheriff, and Judge Thomas decided to take a day trip to Sanlando and A&S's only passenger car was coupled to number 35, along with seven freight cars and a brass caboose.  The engine handled this consist with ease and returned in time for the passengers to get a beer and shoot pool at Trackside Tavern.

One disappointment was the videos taken.  For various reasons, including equipment malfunction, the videos will be postponed until next week. 

There is no story this week.  Your reporter has been otherwise occupied and hopes to remedy that situation tomorrow.  However, pics of 1534 and number 35 are attached for your viewing pleasure.

                                                                        (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-310520155148.jpeg)
 
                                                                        (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-310520155401.jpeg)
                                   
                                                                        (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-310520154941.jpeg)







Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on May 31, 2020, 04:49:08 PM
Thanks for keeping us informed Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on May 31, 2020, 06:16:06 PM
A fun time was had by all..... ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: sdrees on May 31, 2020, 06:24:08 PM
what is the source for custom decals?
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 01, 2020, 10:38:45 AM
what is the source for custom decals?


Steve,

I'm having Jim at Highball Graphics do the Atlantic and Southern decals.

https://www.highballgraphics.com/index.php/custom-decals/custom-waterslide-decals (https://www.highballgraphics.com/index.php/custom-decals/custom-waterslide-decals)


Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: madharry on June 01, 2020, 12:42:26 PM
Thanks Judge for the update.
Mike
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on June 02, 2020, 08:11:43 AM
Judge


Thank you for the update, it sounds like all is well in the South.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on June 03, 2020, 10:58:25 AM
Hey Judge:

Sound good. Betty's is a great kit built it when it first came out.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 07, 2020, 10:44:31 AM
Saturday Report, Atlantic & Southern Railroad, "The Southern Route."  June 6, 2020

Apologies are in order for my late posting of the promised Saturday Report.  My excuse is technological in that the video attached to the report was unavailable until late Saturday evening and I was busy with other things by that time.

The Board of Directors met promptly at 8:30 a.m.  The "slogan" that will be emblazoned on S&S rolling stock at some future time was decided and decals have been ordered for both freight and passenger equipment.  The A&S will be marketed as "The Southern Route."  Suggestions such as "Empire of The Great Swamp" and "The Envy of the World" were rejected as not adequately describing the pike.   

It was a mixed day of railroading.  We started out with a run of the newly acquired H5 2-6-6-2.  The engine was located at Summit and it crawled around that level before heading down the Ovalix for the Midlands.  It takes a good 15 minutes for the trip.  The H5 is a slow hog with only 55-inch drivers so a scale 10-15 mph is about right for it. The fun is watching all those drivers and moving parts and listening to the two steam engines go in and out of sync.  A Southern RR single chime whistle was selected from the over 40 available choices.

Once 1534 managed to arrive at the Midlands level, it slowly rounded the wye at Bedford Forrest and emerged on the mainline.  The A&S official photographer, I. Ken Snappem, was there to video the arrival.  See below.

Lunch was at our Italian joint and passed without incident. 

After lunch, we ran the Pennsy K4 and the A&LM ten-wheeler.    A good time was had by everyone except the A&S Director of Maintenance, Will Fixer, who has some minor mechanical repairs to do before the next session.

This week's story is a true story of the adventures of the dedicated personnel who make the A&S the glorious pike it is.

                                                                                            ANOTHER DAY, ANOTHER DOLLAR, ON THE A&S

Every railroad has its challenges and its limits.  The Atlantic & Southern Railroad is no exception.  The A&S has the majority of its trackage located in Central Florida, where the land is flat and is no more than a few inches above sea level.  Hills, such as they are, are few and far between.  The challenge crews have negotiating the railroad is climbing (or descending") the Ovalix.  The Ovalix, which is a marvel of engineering, is composed of a total of ten revolutions to raise or lower rail traffic from one of the levels of the railroad to either of the other two.  Each revolution is 26' in length with a constant grade of 1 degree.  A one-degree grade is perfectly acceptable, and rarely obtainable, for a model railroad, but it puts limits on the length of trains pulled by steam locomotives.  That is one reason why the sides of the Ovalix have been flattened.  And that is why the structure is called an Ovalix and not a helix.  Helper service is often needed to pull long trains up the grade.

The A&S has a number of veteran engineers who have years of experience both locally and from as far away as Chicago and California. 

The number one veteran engineer of the A&S rails is Uncle Henry O'Leary, who drifted down to Florida in the '20's before the Florida Boom went bust.  Uncle Henry came from the B&O, where he signed on as a signalman and was on the fireman's extra board before he pulled the pin and headed south.  He fired many a mallet while in service with the B&O, whose practice was to load as many cars as the engine could move and then add a few more. 

Ethan Douglas came from East Texas and wound up on the Espee.  He ran freight over the mountains and high varnish down the coast of California.  The lack of seniority finally got him in the '30's and he migrated from the dust bowl to the lush forests and rivers of Central Florida.

One summer morning Uncle Henry found himself assigned to a coal drag so he caught the local peddler freight from Sanlando to The Bottoms and located his train.  The engine was a newly shopped 2-6-6-2, recently acquired by a very favorable lease from the C&O.  Uncle Henry climbed into the cab, grunted a greeting to the fireman and the head shack, and proudly gripped the throttle to get a "feel" for the engine.  Number 1534 was not as big or as powerful as the 2-8-8-2's on the B&O but she was of proven USRA design and could run a few miles per hour faster than the lower drivered Em1's. 

Uncle Henry tried the air and warned the fireman that there was hard work ahead.  The orders required 1534 to move from The Bottoms to Summit, a long, hard trip in the summer at between 5 and 10 mph.  Firing 1534 up the Ovalix was back-breaking work, even with a recently installed stoker. 

Uncle Henry pulled on the throttle and gave the engine a little steam.  The slack was taken up on the 30-odd coal hoppers coupled to the tender and 1534 started moving with sharp, barking exhaust.  By the time Uncle Henry passed the king switch at the end of the yard and pulled onto the mainline, 1534 was doing 10 mph and the earth vibrated as she passed. 

Soon the big engine came to the Ovalix and began the climb to Summit.  Only engineers with Uncle Henry's experience could handle a heavy drag like the one he was pulling without the front engine slipping. 

Summertime weather in Florida usually finds temperatures in the 90's by 10:00 a.m. and railroad crews were drenched with sweat due to the high humidity.  Smoke, coal dust, and cinders add to the miserable conditions found in the cab of a big freight hog climbing up from The Bottoms to Summit.

After nearly 3 hours of sweat and toil, 1534 finally reached the flatlands of The MIdlands, where the crew stopped for water and beans.  They climbed down from the cab and walked the short distance to Sweaty Betty's Diner for lunch.  Betty's cook, Bo, who is a tall, skinny drink of water, laid on the hamburgers and fries, along with a generous glass of cold sweet tea.  Price per meal, $1.25.  Betty's diner has a pretty extensive menu, but the only thing on it that isn't fried is the iced tea. 

After lunch, the crew mounted the cab and brought the train around Eaton's Curve and over the bridge at Mosquitto Lagoon on the way back to the Ovalix for another three hour battle up the grade to Summit. 

The big mallet arrived at the yardmaster's shack just in time for the crew to go on the law and turn over 1534 to Ethan Douglas and his crew for the trip back down the Ovalix.

Uncle Henry piled into his bed in the bunkhouse and thought to himself, "another day, another dollar, on the A&S."



                                                                                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0hjJvH4zEA&t=8s
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 07, 2020, 10:58:16 AM
Great looking steamer in the video.....another gem Bill - thanks.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Rollin on June 07, 2020, 12:09:21 PM
That steamer truly sounds excellent, but what I love is the variety in the coal loads, really looks authentic!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on June 07, 2020, 12:20:44 PM
Another wonderful report!   ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 07, 2020, 12:32:07 PM
Greg and Rollin - Thanks for the comments.  I thought I had lost my readers due to a three-week absence from the forum. 

The coal loads are just storebought plastic inserts.  Probably from a variety of manufacturers.  Many of them are between 30 and 40 years old. 

For some reason, coal loads, pulpwood loads, and other products of that sort are unavailable from sources such as Walthers.   I wonder what is causing the shortage? 

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 07, 2020, 12:34:21 PM
Thank you, Bob.  Now all three of my readers have reported.  Happy Days!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on June 07, 2020, 12:41:32 PM
Another great story and video. I forgot to post earlier.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 07, 2020, 12:41:56 PM
Hey, I read it as well.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 07, 2020, 12:44:56 PM
Gangbusters!  My readers have increased by 25%!
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on June 07, 2020, 05:04:37 PM
Great video and story, Judge.


Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 07, 2020, 10:30:52 PM
Thanks, Jeff, for taking the time to read my little stories and for your kind remarks.  OHE
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on June 08, 2020, 06:52:59 AM

Judge,


I'll echo everyone's comments.  Great story as usual and the video is the icing on the proverbial cake.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jbvb on June 08, 2020, 05:51:19 PM
C'mon, this forum software does report 'Views'.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 20, 2020, 12:53:30 PM
Saturday Report - June 20, 2020.  Beautiful weather in Central Florida this first day of summer.  The temperature is 82 degrees at 11:00 a.m. and the blue sky has a few clouds.  It may rain a little later in the afternoon. 

The Board of Directors meeting was scheduled for Friday this week.  An unusual, but necessary, move due to the scheduled memorial service for our good friend and model railroader, Jim Miller.

The Board reviewed the disappointing performance of the recently shopped Pennsy K4s.  The engine would run normally for a while and then lose sound.  Tom installed three different decoders and performance was not improved.  Either we had three defective decoders or something else was causing the problem.  We contacted the A&S Director of Maintenance, Will Fixer, and he focused our attention on the Sagami can motor.  This motor has served with distinction for over 40 years, having been installed in the 70s.  It has now passed its expiration date and may be placed on display for celebration of its longevity.  Readers should be reminded that the K4s was acquired from the collection of Richard N. DeWitt, who passed away on Christmas Eve, 2006.  Dick was the owner of DeWitt's Railroads, Orlando's premiere train hobby shop.Dick bought the K4s in the early 1970s and it ran almost continuously on the hobby shop layout for many years.  Fortunately, Northwest Short Line can provide a replacement motor.

The main activity of the day was to video a scene to go with this week's story.  The video link is provided at the end of this week's story.  In addition to the video, your reporter ran an A-B-A consist of E-7 Pennsy diesels pulling a mixed freight while the K4s decoders were being detached and attached.

The roundhouse crew is going to (hopefully) complete the shopping of the C&O K-3 this week.  This engine will be put into heavy freight service.

The idea for this week's story came from the October 1938 edition of Trains magazine.   

                                                                                                                  The Spotter

    Railroads like to keep tabs on the performance of their crews, especially on passenger trains.  Sometimes, the railroad will hire an ex-employee from another road, usually a boomer, to be a "spotter."  This individual receives a free ticket from one point on the road to another and sits and observes the quality of service and the conduct of the crew on the trip.  A report of any rule violations is later rendered to the management and action is taken where necessary to correct faulty service or the conduct of the crew during the trip. 
    The Atlantic Coast Line has a passenger train (Number 42) that makes a daily trip run from Sanlando to St. Petersburg back each weekday, with a number of local stops on the way.  The train, consisting of two ACL FP7 locomotives, four headend cars, and three coaches, is typical of local passenger service on the ACL.  The ACL had 44 of the FP7s.  They were basically F7s that had been stretched four feet to accommodate a boiler to provide steam to heat and cool the passenger cars.  Nineteen of these units had their boilers removed in later years and were used exclusively in freight servicel
    One summer afternoon, Number 42 pulled out of the St. Petersburg Station and eased out on the mainline on its way back to Sanlando.  The conductor, "Hap" Hatter and the head brakeman, Bud Millstone, who both hailed from Tahope, stood in the vestibule of the last coach, chatting.  While Hap chewed a plug and Bud had a smoke, a scruffy looking passenger came through on his way forward to the next coach. Hap remarked, "Bud, I ain't seen that passenger before on this run, and I know all the regulars.  "I ain't seed him neither," said Bud.
    The next day a report was received by the superintendent that the crew was violating the rules by using tobacco during the trip.  Both Hap and Bud were called on the carpet for it and they promised it would never happen again.
    A few days later, while the train was heading north from St. Pete, Hap and Bud saw the same scruffy passenger sitting in the last coach.  The cleaning crew had not cleaned the train after it arrived in St. Pete and there were candy wrappers, newspapers, and other trash scattered around in the cars.  Hap and Bud were too busy to police up the trash so it did not cause them concern.
    The next day another report was filed and Hap and Bud were called on the carpet once again.  This time the warning was more serious.  "If you want to keep on as the crew on Number 42, there better not be any more complaints," said the superintendent. 
    Hap and Bud put their heads together and decided there must be a spotter on the train.  That didn't sit right because the ACL never used spotters on local passenger runs.  Hap got up close to Bud's ear and whispered, "Bud, I think there is someone trying to get us bumped off this run."  "Who would do such a thing?" asked Bud.  "I suspect it may be that shiftless skonk Short Stack, who just got promoted to brakeman.  He's had his eyes on this run ever since he got promoted."  "Well," said Bud, "that stranger shore ain't Short Stack.  Must be one of his friends or maybe even one of his kin."
    Bud kept an eye on the new passenger the next time he boarded the train.  When he took off his coat and hat to put them in the luggage rack, Bud saw an ACL Rule Book sticking out of his hip pocket.  Bud reported this fact to Hap, who suggested they needed to discourage further spotter activity.  They decided not to approach the passenger directly just in case he was a real spotter and not one of Short Stack's agents. 
    When the train arrived in Orlando, Hap made a quick telephone call from the ticket agent's office and returned to the train.  "Don't worry, Bud, everything is under control," he said. 
    About that time, another stranger boarded the train.  He was a tall, muscular type with a scar on his cheek and a brakeman's club in his right hand.  He approached the unsuspecting passenger and bodily removed him from his seat.  He escorted him to the nearest vestibule where Hap and Bud were waiting and removed the rule book from his pocket.  "Where'd you git this," Hap demanded from the terrified passenger?  "Short Stack give it to me," he said, "he's my cousin."  "Whuts yore name, you slimy worm, Bud demanded?  "Newt Fisher" came the reply.  "Newt, meet Bruce Bonebreaker, a friend of mine who was just released from state prison.  He's gonna put you off in Sanlando and we better never see you on this train again."  "Don't worry none," said Newt, "just don't put me off until the train stops."
  "Waal, Bruce, its good to see you again old friend," said Hap.  "I heared you'd been released after that prison stint you got in ORange County and I'm glad I could get in touch with ya."  "My pleasure," said Bruce, "I don't reckon you'll be seein' Short Stack's cousin any more on this train.  Happy to have been of service to ya."

There is a link below to a video depicting Numer 42 on its way through the cut near Perkins Farm.  The engineer, Uncle Henry O'Leary, provides some diesel horn music for the photographer.
     

                                                                                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7rD6at8IXo
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 20, 2020, 02:35:52 PM
Judge,

Great story.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 20, 2020, 03:24:11 PM
Great story with a happy ending.....can't beat that Bill.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on June 20, 2020, 03:24:28 PM
Great RR story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on June 20, 2020, 07:31:05 PM
Judge


I enjoyed the report, the story, and the video. Very nice work. Please keep them coming.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Dennis Bourey on June 20, 2020, 07:59:08 PM
Very well done!!!!Judge....Dennis
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 21, 2020, 10:42:02 AM
Dennis, Curt, Greg and John - Thank you for the kind words.  I appreciate comments and suggestions.

                                                                                                       THE REST OF THE STORY

This week's story about the Spotter was conceived by me after I read a rather long tale in the October 1938 issue of Railroad Magazine.  Several days after I read the tale, I picked up one of the many Atlantic Coast Line books in my library and opened it up to the first page.  I looked at a photograph of an ACL local passenger train powered by a pair of FP7s trailed by several headend cars and a few heavyweight coaches.  I suddenly remembered that Tom Langford used the photo to visualize the cut passing through Perkins Farm on the mainline of the Atlantic & Southern.  That is when I thought to make the ACL part of the story about the Spotter and to ask Tom to make the video.  (Actually, we made two videos. Tom posted one on his thread and I posted the other at the end of this week's story.)

Regular readers of the Saturday Report will recognize Bruce Bonebreaker.  He appeared as the defendant in the Butts Bar-B-Q shootout (page eight) and later as the owner of the Trackside Tavern (page twenty-one).   

I have attached the photo I saw in the ACL book.  I have included it so my loyal readers can compare the photo with the video and see just how close Tom came to capturing the essence of this rural Florida scene. 


                                                                   (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-210620102752.jpeg)


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on June 21, 2020, 11:21:30 AM
Great story as well as background information as to the inspiration for the cut through Perkin's farm.  :D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on June 21, 2020, 11:44:45 AM
Excellent as always Bill.  And thanks for the back story on this weeks report and article.
Amazing work by Tom after seeing the inspiration that he worked from and how close he got to the look and feel of the picture you provided.


Great work guys on all accounts !!!   And though I don't always comment, I am always following along the exploits of the A&S, the activities of the Butty Group, and the weekly 'Saturday Evening Post' ...
Thanks Bill and Tom for allowing us along on your A&S journey !!
AND a Happy Father's Day to all,
--Paul
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 21, 2020, 03:39:13 PM
Thank you for the kind comment Paul. 

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on June 27, 2020, 04:42:26 PM
Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report, June 27, 2020  - It's summer in Florida.  The temperature is over 95 degrees and the humidity is over 85%.  You get drenched with sweat just walking from your house to your garage.  Not a good time for y'all to visit, especially with the pestilence among us. 

The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours this morning.  The C&O K-3 is nearly ready to be put into service, but the test run revealed some mechanical problems that the A&S Maintenance Director, Will Fixer, must attend to this week.  There were some other minor problems, derails due to turn-outs not being correctly thrown, etc.  Some minor adjustments also had to be made to the new ACL ten-wheeler.  That engine also had a close call, which will be further explained by Tom after this report is posted.  We need to hire a bridge tender for the Great Divide.  Bridgett, who watches over the bridge that spans the Sewanee River Lagoon, can only do so much.

Greg deMayo and Curt Webb arrived after 10:00 a.m.  Greg's recently acquited 2-8-0 is out of the paint shop and needs a coal load before being placed in service.  Curt brought some recently acquired Athearn Genisis Pennsy F-3's to test run.   His models have high fans on the roof.  I thought F-2's were the diesels with the high fans.  But then, I can't tell the difference between a GP-7 and a GP-9 and wouldn't know a Uboat if it slipped up on me.  Any engine manufactured much after 1950 can't hold my attention.

We adjourned for lunch at 11:00 and journeyed to Del-Dio's Italian Restaurant.  There were only two customers there beside us so we waived masks and chowed down on salad, pizza, and other goodies.

After lunch we ran the Pennsy F-3's leased by the A&S and gave the ten-wheeler another run - more about that later.

The meeting broke up about 1:30 and will reconvene next weekend. 

This week's story has its origins from the August 1938 Railroad Magazine.  The facts have been changed and the names are different, but so is the story so enjoy it.

                                                                                       BRAKING AT THE ROUNDHOUSE COALING TOWER

    The steam locomotive service facility at Tahope has a coaling tower.  The tower has a loading track that passes under the tower and has a pit below where coal hoppers are emptied.  The coal is lifted from the pit by the coaling tower elevator.  The empties are switched onto an adjacent track for later pick-up. 
    Ralph Clark had been braking for the A&S for over a year since he graduated from Tahope County High School and he had gotten really good at his job, which was to brake cars in and around the steam service facility. 
    Ralph had an admirer, a sweet young thing named Lily Packer, (most of the "wimmins" raised in Tahope are named after flowers or plants) who was a senior at Tahope High that year and whose father owned the grocery store in Tahope.  Lily liked to watch switching operations when Ralph was braking and admire his "skills." 
    There were daily deliveries of coal to the coaling tower.  Shifter Number 71 would back up two or three hoppers down the loading track and release them on the fly.  Ralph would position himself on the lead hopper and ride it to a stop over the coal pit.
    Now, it takes teamwork to successfully accomplish spotting the hoppers over the pit.  The speed of the loco must be just right.  If the hopper is uncoupled from the loco too early, it will stop before making the spot.  If the loco is going too fast when the hopper is uncoupled, it will pass the spot and run into the wheel stops at the end of the loading track.  Engineer Ethan Douglas had made this move numerous times and Ralph would ride atop of the hopper to the spot without having to manually work the hand brake.
    One afternoon, Lily came to watch the action (and to watch Ralph) as the hoppers were being shoved into position under the coaling tower.  Ethan Douglas called in sick that day and was replaced by Steve Carpenter, who had never worked the coaling tower tracks.  Ralph positioned himself on the coal pile of the lead hopper.  Steve backed into the loading track and kicked three hoppers at over 20 mph.  Ralph was relaxing and watching Lily Parker when he realized the cut of hoppers was moving too fast to stop before running into the wheel stops.
    At first, Lily cheered Ralph on as he sat nonchalantly atop the hopper's coal pile, but the cheer turned into a squeal when she realized the hopper was not stopping.  Just as the hopper passed under the coaling tower, Ralph jumped for his life while the hoppers continued on their way and ran into the wheel stops with a loud crash.
    Seeing Ralph was uninjured, Lily ran to his side, grabbed him by the ears, and planted a big, wet kiss on him. 
    Later, in the roundhouse, Steve apologized for misjudging the speed of the cut of hoppers.  Ralph, who was still recovering from Lily's enthusiastic shower of affection, said, "Steve, do you think you could bid for that roundhouse switching job?"

                           (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-270620163633.jpeg)
                             No. 71, Steve Carpenter, Engineer                         
                                                       
                           (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-270620163419.jpeg)
                                                         Backing up to the pit               


                             (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-270620163846.jpeg)
                                                     Ralph on his perch on the lead hopper




Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on June 27, 2020, 06:34:19 PM
Judge,


FWIW, early production F3's were almost identical carbodies to the F2's including the chicken wire side panels and high fans.  Late F3's had the stainless side grills and low fans, and looked like F7's.


I think the moral of your story is sometimes it is better to be lucky than good.  Or, maybe unintended consequences that put a smile on your face can pop up where least expected. ;D 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 27, 2020, 06:45:40 PM
Fun story Bill.....and a good time was had by all.  :)

Great paint job on the St.L&D 2-8-0 Tom.....thanks for all the time and effort you put in on this little gem.  8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on June 27, 2020, 06:48:07 PM
There are three bridges on the Atlantic and Southern RR. This is the Paul Harvey version of today's story.

It's the A&S policy to loudly announce "The bridge is OUT, or the bridge is IN." when trains are running. This means all trains must STOP! During this time, the Babe came into the train shed and was talking to Greg and Curt. I previously announced, "The bridge is OUT" and then joined in on the conversation.

The Engineer didn't hear "The bridge is out" and continued his run across the Suwannee River Lagoon. He made the normal Toot Toot, to Bridgett on the way to the Great Divide. We all heard a thump and turned to look. The Midlands bridge over the Great Divide was OUT and this is what we all saw.

I really can't tell ya'll what can happen to a brass loco that falls from the track some 38.5 inches to the bottom of the Great Divide.

Tom  :-X

(http://modelersforum.com/gallery/24-270620145651.jpeg)

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on June 27, 2020, 07:16:31 PM
Tom,


I'm thinking you need a microswitch that cuts power to the last three feet or so of track when the bridge is out.  I'm not a DCC guy but it seems to me like that wouldn't be particularly difficult to install.  I'm just guessing that any engine that takes a dive would be more than a little worse for wear.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Zephyrus52246 on June 27, 2020, 07:17:33 PM
Great story, Judge.  Lucky save on the loco.  :o   Looks like you need to install a track deadening switch when it's open.  Tougher to do with the "Keep Alives". 


Jeff
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on June 27, 2020, 09:33:57 PM
Great story Bill. It was a lucky save with the steamer.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on June 28, 2020, 08:36:06 AM
Lesson learned?.....A hung up loco fends off a geezer stroke-out.  ::)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jbvb on June 28, 2020, 10:20:35 AM
I'll add to Jerry's note about F-3s, there was also a Phase II or 'chicken wire' version.

Regarding the bridge, stopping sections are OK until an engineer is looking the wrong way when operating a new, fancy DCC loco with keep-alive tech.  Then you need a mechanical positive stop.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on June 28, 2020, 11:06:53 AM
Sounds like everyone had a good time yesterday in spite of the close call.  Another great story Bill!  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 01, 2020, 05:56:28 AM
Bob, Curt, Greg, James, Jeff, and Jerry -  Thank y'all for taking the time to comment on this week's Saturday Report.  The A&S management uses the Report in lieu of corporate minutes, so we try to make them accurate.  You never know when the ICC or the State Railroad Commission might poke around.

 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: S&S RR on July 01, 2020, 07:41:54 AM
Bill


I'm late to the party this week but great report and that was way to close with that locomotive. I have a couple locomotives in boxes,  "labeled to be fixed",  that didn't get stopped in time during testing runs on my layout.  :-[ 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 03, 2020, 11:27:26 AM
John - We have dumped several locomotives into the Great Divide.  Fortunately, they were diesels (who cares about them?) and no permanent damage was suffered.   I think the idea of installing some sort of fail-safe device is a good idea.  I will take it up with the board tomorrow.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on July 03, 2020, 11:49:50 AM
I remember seeing some clever engineering using cams.  When the bridge was installed, the cams pushed down "normally in place" pins at the end of the track.  When the bridge was up, those pins would pop up at the end of the track to block the train from taking the deep dive down.


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 04, 2020, 03:31:52 PM
Thank everyone for commenting on this thread.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 04, 2020, 04:18:50 PM
Saturday Report - Independence Day, 2020.  Hot and humid today with temperature in the 90's and thundershowers in the afternoon.

The Board of Directors of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad met promptly at 8:30 a.m.  The motive power department was given a cheer for repairing the Pennsy K4s and the C&O K3 Mikado.  Both engines had to have the "chuff" adjusted so there would be four beats to the revolution of the drivers.  This takes some doing.  It is not hard to time the "chuffs" but patience is needed.  Locomotives have different size drivers and sometimes it takes a few minutes to get it right. 

Speaking of drivers, the roundhouse crew replaced the drivers on the K4s with brand new ones.  (The "new" drivers are actually about 40 years old, but they have never touched a railhead.)  This engine was the property of Richard (Dick) DeWitt, who owned the hobby shop in Orlando.  When he passed, the A&S inherited several Pennsy locomotives, including some spare drivers.  Who would have known?  Anyway, this particular engine must have run several thousand actual miles on Dick's store layout and it was time to switch out drivers as long as the boiler was lifted off the frame for installation of a new motor.  The motor that was mounted in the engine was the original motor and it was shot, to say the least.

We ran the K4s and the K-3 to test them and made a video that is posted on Tom's K-3 thread.  Next week we will produce at least two more videos of Pennsy passenger trains on the A&S.  It is hard to believe the Pennsy would meander south to a Central Florida Swamp, but the blame goes to Dick DeWitt, who was an avid Pennsy fan.  Anyway, its our railroad.  Your reporter has explained the unusual relationship the A&S has with the Pennsy in prior reports and, for those interested, they are still part of this thread.

Lunch was at Smokey Bones because Del Dio's was closed for the 4th.  We were the only customers in the place - a Covid moment.

After lunch we made two more videos (see below) and called it a day.

The idea for this week's story comes from one of the 1938 Railroad Magazines.  Coal is something Floridians have forgotten about since he passing of steam engines.  Few, if any, Floridians used coal for heat in the "winter."  So, your reporter was facinated twith the problems that come with lignite.


                                                                                  THE LIGNITE EXPERIMENT - INDEPENDENCE DAY 1950.

In Central Florida each summer, between late June and early October, it rains nearly every afternoon.  Many of these cloudbursts are accompanied with thunder and lightning.  Orlando has been designated as the country's lightning capital.

The City of Jacksonville is famous for its fireworks displays on Independence Day every year so the president of the A&S Railroad scheduled a special train for a trip from Tahope to Jacksonville on July 4, 1050, so his family and friends could watch the show.

Ethan Douglas drew the right-side job for the trip and a new fireman named Wayne Shoemaker was assigned  to handle the firing duties.  The motive power for the trip was a ACL 1401, a mountain type of USRA design.

The Pennsy delivered daily to the A&S at the coaling tower near the Tahopy roundhouse.  The coal salesman convinced Assistant Roundhouse Forman Tater Cartwright to accept several hoppers of lignite coal, which was considerably less expensive than the regular bituminous shipment.

Twenty hoppers of lignite were delivered on the morning the president's special train was scheduled to make the trip from Tahope to Jacksonville.  A hostler moved 1401 to the coaling tower and filled the tender's coal space with lignite. 

Engineer Douglas ran 1401 light the short distance from the coaling tower to the ready track and Steve Carpenter coupled switcher Number 71 to the eight-car passenger consist and shoved it into 1401. 

The Special left Tahope on time at 1:00 p.m. and steamed towards Sanlando.  Wayne began firing the engine as they pulled out of the ready track and over the Tahope River Bridge.  He had never seen lignite before and wondered at the smallness of the coal.  He managed to keep the fire hot enough to steam fro the first few miles, but then a Florida couldburst came and the lignite in the coal bunker turned into so much mud.  The engine began to lose steam pressure and Ethan Douglas hollered for more steam as the train crossed the St. Johns River Bridge.  The pressure continued to drop as Wayne shoveled fine grain mud into the firebox. 

The engineer brought 1401 to a halt at the station in Deland.  By that time steam pressure was so low the engine could make no headway.  Douglas put his hand to the water glass and it was cold to the touch.  He shouted, "Dadgummit, what the heck happened to this fire?"  Or he said something like that.

About that time Conductor Melvin Hatter climbed into the cab and surveyed the situation.  "Better call for another engine," he said.  But all the available engines had been fueled with the recently delivered lignite.  The SAL came to the rescue and provided a GP-7 to haul the Special to Jacksonville and back.

The president returned to Tahope the next day.  He went to the roundhouse and had a set-to with Tater Cartwright.  He said, "Tater, you bonehead, don't you ever order another load of lignite for the A&S!"  And Tater became known as "Bonehead Cartwright" from that day until this.  Except his girlfriend, Peaches, still calls him "Sweetie Pie."  And nineteen hoppers of lignite were shipped back to Pennsylvania.


                                                                                         https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcAgX8DcjME

                                                                                          Independence Day Special leaves for Jacksonville


                                                                                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avjvqzEkUdk

                                                                                                Independence Day Special Returns to Tahope
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on July 04, 2020, 04:47:51 PM
Great story Bill. You know you can't trust a Yankee salesman. Great videos.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on July 04, 2020, 07:16:14 PM
Bill,


If those hoppers were caught in the same rainstorm weren't nineteen hoppers full of mud shipped back to the Pennsy? Just wondering...


Great videos, and the story sets them up perfectly. 



Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on July 04, 2020, 07:57:56 PM
Great story Bill.  Even though I'm from coal country (my grandfather and my better half's grandfather were both coal miners) I had to look up lignite coal.  We come from the anthracite regions of PA.  Bituminous coal comes from Slim's neck of the woods.  Speaking of which, it looks to me like the tenders on the A&S are loaded with anthracite coal.  You better get Will E. Fixer to swap them out with bituminous coal loads if that's what the A&S burns.   ;) 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 05, 2020, 09:13:09 AM
Great story Bill.....I can understand Tater trying to save a buck, but penny pinching can sometimes bite ya in the butt.  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 05, 2020, 09:42:39 AM
Jerry -The nineteen other hopper loads were indeed reduced to mud.  I understand there is some sort of use for that stuff.  Can they make coke out of it? 

Bob - I have always assumed the A&S used bituminous coal because that is what all good Southern Railroads used.  But I could be wrong.  All I know is the pop valves on the engines running on the A&S pop regularly. 

Greg & Curt - Thanks for reading and responding. 

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Blazeman on July 05, 2020, 10:45:36 AM
Your Honor:  Lignite does not come from PA.  A lot from Texas and the Dakotas-Montana.

Larry from PA.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: BandOGuy on July 05, 2020, 01:45:07 PM
It's also easy to determine the type of coal being used in Pennsylvania as the anthracite burners had wider fireboxes (check Reading, CNJ and Jersey Central loco photos for examples). And that is not a mis-type. There was a Central Railroad of New Jersey and a Jersey Central Railroad. Even in those days, the government of New Jersey overtaxed its citizens and corporations. CNJ tried to escape this by shifting assets to Pennsylvania, but the dodge failed.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 09, 2020, 05:08:49 PM
Larry - Thank you for pointing out that lignite does not come from Pennsylvania.  The A&S gets its coal exclusively from the Keystone State and we are appreciative of it. We order bituminous coal and that is what is in our coal hoppers, no matter what Butts says.

 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: tom.boyd.125 on July 09, 2020, 06:34:01 PM
Tom,
 After reviewing the latest... Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report...did not see any mention of these new checks...
Tommy
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on July 09, 2020, 09:06:14 PM
Larry - Thank you for pointing out that lignite does not come from Pennsylvania.  The A&S gets its coal exclusively from the Keystone State and we are appreciative of it. We order bituminous coal and that is what is in our coal hoppers, no matter what Butts says.


Objection, lack of foundation.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 11, 2020, 03:19:26 PM
Larry - Where do you get those checks?  I'll change banks if necessary to get them. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 11, 2020, 04:31:34 PM
Saturday Report - July 11, 2020.

The Board of Directors of the Atlantic and Southern Railroad met promptly at 8:30 a.m.  The main item on the agenda were decals.  Our decal source sent us samples and we are very pleased.  We will soon have decals for steam engines, freight cars, and passenger cars.  The A&S logo will be in a diamond shape like the AB&C's logo (The AB&C was a railroad that ran up into Alabama from Florida - the ACL acquired it in the early 1900's.)

The Southern MS4 Mikado is ready for the final touches.  Hopefully, it will be ready for its trial run next week. 

We ran the Pennsy K4s in the morning session.  We decided to make a video of the Jacksonian after lunch.  The Jacksonian is a complete train leased from the Pennsy.  Originally, it was to run from St. Petersburg to Jacksonville and back daily.  However, the schedule is a little too tight for that and the train will run from Tahope's Sanlando Depot to Jacksonville with stops in Sanford, Deland, and Palatka before arriving in Jacksonville.  Unfortunately, the video of the K4s did not turn out to our satisfaction.  Why is it that model trains that have never given any trouble, stall on a turnout, derail, and lose sound as soon as a video camera is turned on?  Better luck next week, as they say.

Since we were running Pennsy trains, we brought the Broadway Limited up from the Bottoms and gave it a spin.  Readers might remember the A&S has a historic connection to the Pennsy and, since it is our railroad, we envision the Broadway Limited to make infrequent turns southward in order to take up the slack of the thousands and thousands of orange juice drinking tourists that invade Florida in the summer.  We made a video after lunch.  It is pretty good.  it shows the Broadway making a whistle-stop at Sanlando.  Only one passenger got off.

This week's story has its origins in the October 1938 Trains Magazine.  There used to be a section each month called "True Tales of the Rails."  I don't know how true these tales are, but this edition had some stories about dangerous situations.  The story I have adopted could be a movie if John Wayne were still available to star in it.  Oh, It forgot.  It's 1938 in the story so he would be available.

                                                                                                    WHEN LUCK FOLLOWS THE TRAIN
The Jacksonian is an A&S daily passenger train that was leased from the Pennsy, including the only K4s to have ever graced the A&S rails.  The train runs from Tahope's Sanlando Depot to Jacksonville, with stops in Sanford, Deland, and Palatka.  It returns to Tahope in the afternoon of the same day. 

The regular conductor on the Jacksonian is Ralph Tinker and the head shack is Bud Millstone.  Both of these seasoned employees are prone to a little practical joking at each other's expense every now and then. 

One summer day in 1938, the Jacksonian pulled out of the Sanlando Depot on time and headed for the trip up the Ovalix to Summit and the Jacksonville Union Station.   

The Jacksonian rates a helper up the constant 1% grade on the Ovalix, so ACL's P-3 Pacific, Number 451 coupled onto the observation car at the end of the train.  As the train climbs slowly towards Summit, Tinker and Millstone perched themselves on the observation car platform and enjoyed the ride. 

As the train neared Summit and was making about 10mph, MIllstone grabbed Tinker's hat and waved it over the tracks as if he were going to toss it onto the roadbed.  Tinker reached over the guard rail to recover his hat about the same time Number 451 cut off for the return to the Midlands.  When 451 cut off, the train jerked forward with increased speed.  This caught Tinker off balance and he fell from the platform onto the roadbed below.  Although 451 had cut off from the observation car, it did not lose its forward momentum.  The twenty-foot distance between Tinker and the cowcatcher of 451 began to rapidly close. 

Tinker rolled onto his back and grabbed the front of the cowcatcher as 451 passed over him and the train dragged him along the roadbed for quite some distance until 451 came to a stop.  Fortunately, the engineer on 451, "Fatso Johnson," saw Tinker fall and he set the brakes and opened the sander.  When the engine stopped, "Fatso" and his fireman dropped to the ground to tend to Tinker, whose shirt and pants were pretty much shredded and his backside was skinned up. 

Tinker, happy to have avoided further injury, asked "Fatso" if he would give him a lift to Summit Yard so he could catch up with his train.  "Fatso" was happy to oblige.

The conversation between Tinker and Milstone that occurred when Tinker caught up with his train is not reported.  However, those who knew them say very little practical joking took place thereafter.  Tinker did not bother to report the incident since it caused no delay and the Jacksonian backed into the Union Station on time.

                                                                                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vD0uwakaHo

                                                             This here video is of the Broadway Limited as it eased through Sanlando and let off one passenger. 

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on July 11, 2020, 05:46:48 PM
We had fun today. I'll show the new A&S logos tomorrow on the Atlantic and Southern thread.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: jerryrbeach on July 11, 2020, 08:32:00 PM
Bill,


Seriously?  You end the story by writing that the train "backed" into Union station.  Seems like there are a lot of rear end jokes in this one.  ;D


Seriously? 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on July 11, 2020, 08:55:37 PM
Another great tall tale Bill. Of course I loved the Broadway Limited video.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 12, 2020, 07:43:16 AM
Enjoyed the yarn today Bill..... :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on July 12, 2020, 08:05:16 AM
Another wonderful tale this week Bill, adding even more color to a wonderful layout !!
Be well,
--Paul
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 12, 2020, 09:30:20 AM
Jerry - The arrival at Union Station in Jacksonville back in the days before AMTRAK was an experience in itself.  The trains backed into the station, but the lead track was several miles long.  it seemed like it took forever to get the train spotted for demarcation.   The ACL, Seaboard, and Southern all had trains coming and going. 

The reference to "back ends" was inadvertent.  I passed your comments on to Maggie Hussy and she remarked that she always gets compliments about hers. 

Thank all of you who commented on this week's story.

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on July 12, 2020, 09:53:27 AM
Another fun story Bill.  Keep 'em coming.  ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on July 12, 2020, 09:55:15 AM
Jerry - The arrival at Union Station in Jacksonville back in the days before AMTRAK was an experience in itself.  The trains backed into the station, but the lead track was several miles long.  it seemed like it took forever to get the train spotted for demarcation.   The ACL, Seaboard, and Southern all had trains coming and going. 

The reference to "back ends" was inadvertent.  I passed your comments on to Maggie Hussy and she remarked that she always gets compliments about hers. 

Thank all of you who commented on this week's story.


Florida East Coast also used Jax Union.

Jacksonville Union Terminal looking south.

(http://modelersforum.com/gallery/24-120720100018.jpeg)

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Blazeman on July 12, 2020, 11:20:29 AM



Florida East Coast also used Jax Union.

Jacksonville Union Terminal looking south.

(http://modelersforum.com/gallery/24-120720100018.jpeg)

Tom  ;D

Looking at the photo, could that be the Broadway Limited cars on the left heading south through Sanlando?
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on July 12, 2020, 02:26:12 PM
Larry,

Exactly. Good eye.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 18, 2020, 01:41:42 PM
Saturday Report - July 18, 2020

The Board of Directors met promptly at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, July 17, 2020, instead of July 18, 2020, because the Babe had her monthly hair appointment in Mount Dora on the 18th.  The discussion centered around the decals being finalized and mailed to the A&S Maintenance Department.  Arrival is expected in a matter of days.  Soon the famous name will be emblazoned on boxcars, steam locomotives, and streamlined passenger cars.

The newly shopped and painted Southern Ms4 2-8-2 looks great!  The mechanism is perfect.  Unfortunately, there is some sort of glitch that causes it to stall frequently.  The A&S maintenance department will look into the problem this week and make adjustments.  Seems like brass engines all have a down-side glitch when they just come out of the shop. 

We are growing more and more concerned about the effectiveness of the "Keep-Alive" feature on WOW Sound decoders.  Your reporter has suggested a call into TCS for an explanation of why some of our locomotives tend to stall on turnouts. 

When the Director's meeting was over, we calibrated and made adjustments on five engines that had new decoders recently installed.  Old 1516, an ACL P-5a Pacific, is back in service.  Two SAL E Units were tested and two ACL FP7's were put through their paces.

Curt Webb arrived in time for an informal bull session and lunch.  We had lunch at the local Red Lobster.  That was the first real restaurant your reporter has entered since March.  Your reporter's apprehensions about social distancing were satisfied when it became apparent that there were only four other people in the joint.

After lunch, we returned to the shed for a short run of the Pennsy K-4s and a ride on the Jacksonian before we called it a day.

This week's story is a little different.  The idea about surplus airplanes came from my childhood when these aircraft were actually being sold.  The rest of the story is a combination of my own imagination and the humor of Al Capp.  Here goes. . . .

                                                                                                         TRANS TAHOPE AIRWAYS

     One day, in the summer of 1951, the feral cousins, Newt Fisher and Shortstack Turner (See Inhabitants of Eaton's Curve, Page. eight), were resting near the river in The Bottoms when Newt suddenly had an idea.  Newt, who had almost done something several times in his life but had always failed, suggested they branch out from their activities as vagabonds and start a business, or as Newt said, "Bid-ness." 
    Shortstack, who was tending the Mulligan Stew, said he read an article in the Tahope Daily Blatter announcing that the federal government was selling war surplus C-47 airplanes at Orlando Air Force Base for $2500 each.  Shortstack thought they could make some money "if'n they bought one of them-thar airplanes" and started up a cargo airline.  They became partners in the venture and decided to call the airline Trans Tahope Airways.  The venture would provide cargo service from Tahope to surrounding cities in competition with the Atlantic & Southern Railroad.
     There were two problems: (1) neither of the partners could fly and (2) they had no money to purchase an aircraft.
    Fortunately, for our would-be entrepreneurs, a recent arrival to The Bottoms was an older gent who identified himself as a WWI German Air Ace named Wilhelm Ludwig Von Outhausen.  He claimed to have been a member of the Red Baron's fighter wing, which was known as "The Flying Circus."  He convinced Newt and Shortstack that his bonafides stretched back to the court of Fredrick the Great of Prussia and assured the two would-be tycoons that he could fly any airplane anywhere and would "join up" as the airline's pilot if he could have an advance of $500. 
    Newt and Shortstack made an appointment with the president of the TAhope State Bank, J. Pierpont Forrest (Great, great grand-nephew of General Bedford Forrest) , who incidentally is the step-father of Peaches Weaver, girlfriend of "Tater" Cartwright, who is the Assistant Roundhouse Forman of the TAhope Steam Service Facility and Roundhouse.
    Mr. Forrest listened to the business plan proposed by Newt and Shortstack and said he would look into it.  He found out that the government had money available to guarantee loans made for war surplus purchases and made arrangements for the loan of $3000.  He delivered a bank check for $500 to Shortstack and said the balance of the government loan would be available as soon as the FAA licensed the enterprise.  Shortack gave Baron Von Outhausen the %500 check to retain his services and awaited approval of their application to the FAA. 
    Upon further inquiry, Mr. Forrest learned there was a catch involving the purchase of the C-47 Aircraft.  The purchase price was $2500 per aircraft, but they had to be bought in groups of ten.  The bank was unwilling to loan that much money to Newt and Shortstack, so the deal fell through.
    About that time, Officer Poovey told  Mr. Forrest that Baron Von Outhausen was a fraud who had a fugitive warrant out of "Jaw-ja." and he had vanished from The Bottoms on a drag freight with the $500.
    "Well," said Newt, "I've almost done something a whole bunch of times and this is one of them."  And Shortstack thought of an alternative plan and said, "Why don't we buy a truck?"  "Naw," said Newt, "you can't compete with the Atlantic & Southern Railroad with a truck."
   
 
 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: bparrish on July 18, 2020, 03:13:33 PM
Judge......  regarding your comment about stalling in a turnout......

Do this first (maybe you already are)  A locomotive can take a long time to fully charge the capacitor depending on how much is going on with the locomotive.  Sound is only part..... how many lights are running.....


So give the locomotive a minute or two to charge up

Then........... on an easily piece of clear track........ not a turnout.   Rock the locomotive off of one rail and hold it.

If the light goes out immediately the keep alive is not working.  If it goes off in one or two it is trying but not fully charged.  Trying to work is a warrantee issue with TCS.   I have only have steam  locos and some that stay lit for ten to twenty seconds but I don't have a lot going on with them.  Single headlight and no ditch or ground lights as Dismals have.

On the TCS T1 decoders I have with keep alive devises......... I manually solder them on to the board and can be put in backwards.  I'm not sure that this is possible with the WOW decoders.


Let me know how the test goes.

see ya
Bob



We are growing more and more concerned about the effectiveness of the "Keep-Alive" feature on WOW Sound decoders.  Your reporter has suggested a call into TCS for an explanation of why some of our locomotives tend to stall on turnouts. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on July 18, 2020, 04:54:54 PM
Interesting story Bill. Tahope almost had a airport, or at least a airstrip.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 18, 2020, 06:26:55 PM
Enjoyed the story Bill.....that would have be a cargo carrier operation to see, if they ever got it off the ground.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on July 20, 2020, 09:56:47 AM
Another fun story!  Wish I could have been there for the festivities on Friday. 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on July 20, 2020, 04:23:35 PM
Hey Bill:

Look like you are having a great time. Continue to enjoy.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Jim Donovan on July 20, 2020, 10:40:24 PM
I love the stories to go along with the fantastic modeling advice. Thanks Tom and The Judge.

PS: If you need pilots for the C-47 Greg and I are in. I see us buying the plane to expand the already mighty reach of the A&S. By offering air service we can start a freight business taking high value items brought to Florida by the A&S, then flying them to Cuba Things like the Zenith Radios and Magnavox TV's everyone is buying. Then we bring back the finest Cigars which the A&S can ship in humidity controlled cars for 10 times what we pay for them.

I know the government is a little corrupt but we can manage the business through a shell company. Greg says he has some good friends out of Chicago that have a Casino in Havana. They will make sure things go smooth, introduce us to the right people and might even help finance the start since they are practically family. For a fee but I am sure it is just a token of respect. Don't worry about so called rebels led by some idiot called Fedel or something. Greg's friends say they have everything under control and the guy won't last six months.

I need to make sure Greg is up for this, he wants to be the chief pilot but I told him he doesn't have his multi-engine rating so I need to be the Chef Pilot. Might need your help on getting this worked out.

So what do you think? Air freight could become big in the future and the A&S needs to stay on the cutting edge.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 21, 2020, 09:24:22 AM
Jim - The minutes from the A&S July 21, 1951, Board of Directors Meeting contain the following information:

The Management of the Atlantic & Southern Railroad has determined that competition by the airlines will never amount to anything to worry about.  After all, how much freight can those planes carry?  And the railroads have no worry about serious competition from the trucking industry.   Most of the highways in the United States are two-lane and the trucks have those gasoline engines that cannot compete with diesel engine efficiency.  In Jaw-ja, many of the highway bridges are wooden structures that cannot hold a vehicle with more than 14 wheels.  Citrus products from Tahope County cannot be economically transported over bridges with those weight limitations.   Besides, if the trucking industry does improve its ability to transport goods in sufficient bulk to cause competition with the railroads, Congress will tax the industry to death to pay for the highway improvements needed.  Nothing will seriously interfere with the interstate transportation of goods by railroad for at least the next fifty years.

 
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 21, 2020, 09:39:21 AM
I'm in.....but there are some conditions.

First - the radial engines on the plane have to be replaced with turbines.....150 mph is a bit too slow for running cigars back up to Tahope, more power is a must if we ever have to outrun those pesky revenuers at "Greg Speed".

Second - call  NJ and Brooklyn and get cousin Guido "Cadillac" Piscatori, uncle Tony "Four Toes" Demeo and his buddy Guiseppe "Triggerman" Bacchiocchi. They have to be on all the flights, along with their hardware....can't ever tell what those commie pinkos will do.

Third - let's not forget that great Cuban rum.....we could buy cheap down there and sell at competitive prices up here and still make greater profits by not paying the darn government taxes like our competitors. The Judge will have to get the police chief to look the other way for these runs, but I'm sure that if we ply him with a few brass steam engines, he'll be on board in a heart beat.

Fourth - you can get the chief pilots spot, but I fly left seat, PIC, till I get the multi engine ticket, then we can switch off on each run.

Sounds like a plan.....lets fly..... 8)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on July 25, 2020, 02:57:56 PM
Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report July 25, 2020.

The Board of Directors met this morning at 0830 hours.  The main topics were receipt of the new A&S decals for freight and passenger cars and locomotives and the acquisition of a new engine through a lease with the C&O.

The decals are excellent.  We have a complete passenger train composed of Walthers Bud cars lettered for Penn Central.  Don't ask me why.  We've had them so long I can't recall their origin.  I do remember they were acquired back in the day when those cars were going for $20 each.  The plan sometime in the future is to re-letter them for Atlantic & Southern.  The A&S logo will go on tenders of larger steam engines, such as Pacifics and Mikes and the words "Atlantic & Southern" will be painted on the tenders of smaller engines, such as switchers, consolidations, and ten-wheelers.

The most exciting part of the morning was taking possession of a new-in-the-box PFM C15A 0-8-0.  This baby is a beauty, although it has a face only a mother could love.  It has a single air pump located on the left side of the smokebox and the somokebox door looks something like the grill of an Edsel.  (How many remember those?  Anybody own one?)  Anyway, there were 15 of these brutes manufactured by Baldwin in 1929 (just in time for the other depression).  They were numbered 110-124.  They stuck around until they were scrapped in 1952-53.  They had 52" drivers, no stokers, 185 lbs. boiler pressure, Baker valve gear and produced 53,950 lbs. of tractive effort.  Seems like there should have been more than one air pump for such a big engine, but the pump looks larger than usual and, since the C15A's were switchers, it is unlikely the air brake hoses were connected very often on cars in tow.  The pic below was taken at the time of delivery and is the artistic creation of Tom Langford.  This model is a relatively rare find and is expected to be busy at Summit Yard after shopping and road testing.

There will be no story this week.  Weekend house guest arriving shortly.


                                                                                (http://modelersforum.com/gallery/684-250720145413.jpeg)

Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on July 25, 2020, 04:31:23 PM
As the Judge mentioned we acquired a new C&O switcher. We purchased this one from the Jim Miller estate. Below is a photo of the front of the smoke box. The loco is one of 500 released and imported by Lambert in 1977.

This will be in the A&S paint shop sometime in late September or early October.


(http://modelersforum.com/gallery/24-250720161440.jpeg)

The passenger cars are Walthers Seaboard Coast Line and the SCL will need to be removed and the new Atlantic and Southern added.

Also, today we had a bad steam loco day. An AB&C mikado developed a rear driver spring malfunction and need to be dead lined. The Southern mikado developed main driver issue and also was dead lined. On our third, we brought up a pair of Southern F7s. Yepper, the lead unit WOW decoder went bad. At this point I gave up and said a few unrepeatable lines.

Also, Curt came by and then Greg showed up just in time to go to lunch. We had a great time and of course we had some serious BSing going on.

All in all, just another normal Saturday on the Atlantic and Southern.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Jim Donovan on July 26, 2020, 08:49:16 AM
Wow what a beautiful engine, and thanks to the Judge and you providing the background. Please make sure to show pictures after you paint it. It is already a headturner, with you painting it, she can only get better.

I'm sorry about the boards reaction to expanding into air freight. A friend of mine has told me about an outfit up in New York region called Mohawk Airlines. They recently changed their name from Robinson since Mohawk provides an image of fierce warrior pride. Great name and logo. They bought a bunch of surplus DC3's. They are looking for investors so I guess I'll go that route. Doubt Greg wants to join since DC3's have been seen being outrun by trains. I myself don't trust those new fangled turbine engines, they might go fast but how reliable can an engine be that uses a fireball to produce energy?

Again, love the engine, it is a beauty.

Jim D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on July 26, 2020, 09:56:29 AM
Tom.....the new switcher is a beaut.  8)

Jim.....I.m in.....flying anything, no matter how slow.....is one heck of a lot better than not flying anything.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on July 26, 2020, 11:53:43 AM
Nice looking acquisition for the A&S.  Should look great working the yard.  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 01, 2020, 03:26:22 PM
Saturday Report - August 1, 2020

The Board of Directors met at 0830 hours as usual.  The discussion focused on the structure being finished for use by the boating public on the Tahope River.  There will be no swimming allowed in the area due to large alligators and poisonous runoff from the nearby pest control company.  Hopefully, the structure will be in place this week and the Oklawaha dam will then release enough water to flood the river bed. 

We ran mostly Southern Railroad engines in the morning session.  A brace of E7A's pulled a load of mixed freight from the Midlands up the Ovalix to Summit.  The assent was smooth as glass up the constant one-degree grade.  We fired up the Southern Ms4 2-8-2 and posed it for two glamour shot run-byes.  Then we went to lunch at Del-Dio's. 

After lunch we satisfied our curiosity and tested several WOW Sound decoders that have been on the dieplay shelf for two or three years.  They all worked pretty well.  A couple of them have minor problems like marker lights being out, but that may not be a decoder probem.  Some of our WOW Sound decoders are over six years old adn some problems are expected.

Speaking of problems, we had no serious failures today.  No wrecks.  No electrical failures.  No system failures.  Today is one for the books!.  Of course, those modelers who follow this weekly report never have problems like these and enjoy perfect performance from layouts wherever they are located.

A video of the Southern 2-8-2 passing through the outskirts of Sanlando is attached for your viewing pleasure.  A longer video is available on Tom's layout thread.

                                                                                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZINZDTRVCsg

This week's story takes place in 1950-51, but it foretells the trials and tribulations of the company employees in the Dilbert comic strip.

                                                                                               PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT EFFICIENCY

Like every large company, the Atlantic & Southern Railroad has a "Personnel Department." (Years in the future it will be called "Human Resources" and will be dreaded by all of the workers.  Besides hiring and firing, one part of the HR office will be called I.T. and another will be charged with investigating on the job conduct of employees.)  But in 1950-51 it was just called the Personnel Department and a lot of the employees assigned there had little to do on most days.

Naturally, one of the personnel Department employees decided it was her job to make work for others so she became an efficiency expert.  Stopwatches were issued to managers, who crept around the roundhouse, the supply shed, the commissary, and the main office building timing various aspects of the duties of others in order to determine what stepes could be taken to reduce the time each job required.

One day, the head of the efficiency team, Lollie Timer, looked upon the various switching goats in the roundhouse service yard and in the yards at Sanlando and Summit and decided there was considerable lost motion there.  It appeared to her that the switch engines spent a lot of time "on the spot," panting and wating for something to do. 

Now Lollie, a recent graduate of Florida State College for Women, knew little or nothing about railroading, but that did not stop her from moving foreward with her efficiency project.  She convinced the A&S Financial Officer, Bucks Denaro, to purchase some timing clocks, which she had mounted in boxes attached to the inside roof inside the cab of each switcher.  These devices were attached secretely and none of the crews knew of their existence.  The timers were designed to time the moves the swithchers made and show the amount of time in between moves.

In early August, 1950, Engineer Ralph Clark climbed into the cab of 0-8-0 #71 and prepared for his daily switch list.  His fireman, Jim, brought the pressure up to the pop-off point and took his seat on hte left-hand side.  As he worked the blower, his eyes wandered up to the roof of the cab and he spied Lollie's box containing the timer.

Jim removed the box and heard it ticking.  He shouted "BOMB!" adn thrw the box into the tender's water tank.  About that time, the conductor, Cap;n Jack P. Cook, climbed into the cab to see what was causing the commotion.  Upon learning the facts, he sent the head shack to the roundhouse to call the police.

In due time, Officer Poovey of the Tahope Police Department arrived on the scene.  Poovey fished the box out from teh tank and, since it was no longer tickng, opened it.  The innards of the box looked like a harmless clocking device so Officer Poovey, Engineer Clark and Jim walked to the roundhouse and reported the incident to Will Fixer, the Roundhouse Foreman and Director of Maintenance. 

Boy oh Boy!  If Lollie Timer had been there to hear Fixer's opinion about effeciency experts, she would have heard language never uttered in the sorority houses of FSCW and would have crawled into a hole and pulled the hole in after her.  "I'll tell you about efficiency," said Fixer.  "Any fool that has been around a railroad yard for ten minutes can tell you that switch engines have down time in between aassignements.  And nothing can be done about it.  Now we've lost over two hours of time and trians are backing up in Sanlando, all because of a clock in a box."




Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: postalkarl on August 01, 2020, 04:50:17 PM
Hey Tom;

I can see it all now. Here comes another beautiful paint job. Can't wait to see it finished.

Karl
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on August 01, 2020, 06:58:29 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on August 02, 2020, 09:26:22 AM
Sorry I missed a perfect operating session.....good story Bill.  :)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PaulS on August 02, 2020, 09:49:13 AM
As always Bill, a wonderful story that easily takes us back to a time and place in a bygone era ...   thanks again for our weekly time travel to perhaps simpler times, much appreciated!


All the best to the Saturday Buddy group with both Isaias and the pandemic.
Be well and stay safe,
--Paul
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on August 02, 2020, 10:04:35 AM
Great story Bill.  That does sound like something a self professed 'efficiency' expert would come up with.  Truly a Dilbert moment.   ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 02, 2020, 01:33:55 PM
Greg, Paul, Bob, Karl, and Curt -  Thanks for the kind comments.  The many victims of the evil geniuses in Human Resources will identify with this week's story. 

We are hunkered down for the virus and this small hurricane that is on its way up the East Coast of Florida.  I can't pronounce the name of this particular storm, but, like all the others, it too will pass. If the storm knocks out our power for any lengthy period of time, we plan on checking into one of the area hotels and eating through room service until power is restored.  Social distancing, you know. 

We have a good time making videos.  Our video cameras are just little Sonys and that limits our ability to get creative.  We plan on upgrading our video production capabilities when we get around to it.  We could start with a mini-cam that we can mount on a flatcar for track level viewing, along with a program we can use for editing.  Sometimes we have to reshoot a scene several times because a whistle didn't blow on time, an engine derailed, a train went into the wrong siding, or an engine stalled on a turnout.  This causes laughter and an occasional cuss word.  Fortunately, the expense of videoing is minimal due to digital technology eliminating the cost of film and development. 

I am searching the April, 1938 Railroad Magazine for ideas for next week's story.  Signing off for now.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: deemery on August 02, 2020, 01:53:35 PM
Here's a nicely done layout "ride along" video, and some notes on how he did it in the associated blog posts:  http://sandcrr.blogspot.com/2020/07/a-moving-picture-made-on-s.html


dave
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 04, 2020, 04:09:29 PM
Dave - Thanks for the video.  It is much better than most.  I have seen dozens of these videos and most of them are terrible.  I have come up with a few suggestions (Rules?) that will make model RR videos more fun to watch. (Lawyers always like Rules.)
 
1.  Plan ahead.  Make sure the scene (as seen through the camera) shows railroad and not layout clutter, children's toys, and exposed ceilings.
2.  No full-size people or their voices or noises allowed in the video.
3.  Add variety.  Include shots other than shots taken from the cowcatcher.  Run-byes, switching, helper service, station stops and the like add interest to what otherwise looks like a home movie.
4.  Use short sentences and phrases to explain what is being viewed - "Big River Crossing," and" the Pacific begins the grade" are examples.
5. Spend the money and get a decent camera.  Download a user friendly program to edit the video.

Attached is an example of a video taken on the A&S several years ago that should rate no more than a "D."  Admittedly, the video photographer had no chance to edit the video, but there wasn't more than a minute or two worth salvaging.  The trip through the staging area (the Bottoms) was unnecessary and way too much time was taken on the Ovalix.  Additionally, the engineer failed to advance the throttle a notch or two at appropriate times and the whole trip was in notch 1. (I think I was the engineer.) I could go on and on.
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jdPxNygosE&t=79s

On the other hand, I saw an excellent video yesterday.  It is attached also. It could be improved if the narrator had more of a Southern accent.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uwx-b-czSSo


Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ACL1504 on August 04, 2020, 04:20:12 PM
NOTE:  This was a video shot by a third party and not by the Atlantic and Southern Video Staff. Just making that clear.

Tom  ;D
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: tct855 on August 04, 2020, 07:31:13 PM
Nice video regardless who filmed it.  Great scenery is great scenery.  Very cool!  Thanx Thom...
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Judge on August 08, 2020, 05:12:28 PM
Saturday Report - August 7, 2020  (Meeting held a day early due to schedule conflict)

The Board of Directors met promptly at 0830 hours and engaged in major discussions.  We discovered the A&S has an undec A-B set of Walthers E7s.  These have been in a stack under the layout for who knows how long.   Such a discovery must be put to good use.  While the A&S has a number of locomotives lettered for the road, it has no diesels.  Since those pesky things appear to be here to stay, the A&S has decided to acquire the aforesaid E7's and paint them for the A&S.  Naturally, the question arose as to just what color(s) should be selected for the diesels.  The tentative agreement reached isfor the A&S management to forecast the future and apply a scheme that will resemble the black and yellow scheme applied to ACL diesels after the road phased out the purple and silver around 1957.  The management thought a silver body with a purple stripe about 30" wide on the lower part would remind all fans of the ACL but would foretell the future of the road.  This project is on hold for further study.

The A&S recently acquired a device called an Accutrack II Speedometer.  This device is powered by two Tripple A batteries and looks like a short tunnel.  As a locomotive passes through it, the device measures the speed and publishes the result on an led display.  This handy gadget is most useful in speed matching locomotives for a consist.  Speed matching has become of great interest to your reporter lately and it is amazing how many videos on the subject can be found on Utube.  The videos by the DCC Guy are the easiest to follow. He uses the Accutrack II to demonstrate.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nVycLtC-pM

The meeting  next week will also be a day early due to the Babe's monthly hair appointment.

There is Covid -19 all around us here in Central Florida, but none of us are infected - at least not yet.  Your reporter and his spouse are basically hunkered down except tor occasional forays out to the grocery store and your reporter's trip to the A&S property.  "If you don't like a mask, you really won't like a ventilator!"

This week's story comes from the same addition of Railroad Magazine as last week's story - April, 1938.  The caboose is possibly the most interesting of all rolling stock.  It was required on the end of freight trians for over 100 years and the definition of a train included an end car with "markers."  The number of stories about these rolling bunk houses abound and here are two of them - One from the NC&StL and the other from the Pennsy.

                                                                                                             Life in The Caboose

    Down on the NC&StL, sometime before the depression, the crews used to have an unpaid member called a "caboose helper."  He was an ambitious colored boy who attached himself to the crew.  He cleaned lamps, cleaned windows, polished the markers, and generally kept the crummy spotless.  He became a first class cook who could make a meal as good as in any restaurant in Chattanooga on top of a pot-bellied stove.  He washed dishes after each meal and polished the conductor's shoes before a drag pulled into a terminal.  Then he departed until the next morning's run.  For all of this he got his meals free when on the road and usually picked up a dollar or two from the rest of the crew for his efforts.
    Signing on as a "caboose helper" may seem like a menial job, but in those days railroads paid better wages than laborers received.  Lots of railroads in the South hired Negro brakemen, but they had to learn the job while they worked it.  Competition for brakeman's jobs was fierce and, since the "caboose helpers" were a known quantity who had experience working with the train crews, they had an advantage.  After a "caboose helper" had been on the job for five or six months, his conductor woudl give him a letter "to whom it may concern" stating the bearer was a "qualified brakeman," and you could bet all the cotton in Jaw-ja he was.  Some of these men made the railroad a career and a few were promoted to firemen. 
    On the Pennsy, there was a crew of boomers who decided to stick around long enough to get a stake before moving on.  Most of the cabooses on the Pennsy had their interiors painted a sickly cream color.  This particular crew decided to make their crummy home and mooched paint from the shop foreman.  They painted the ceiling a dark green.  Then thry sanded down the walls and applied a coat of varnish to them.  They somehow found comfortable mattress cushions for the bunks in the cabin and took up residence there to avoid paying boarding house prices for a place to stay.  Their crummy was the envy of the division.  They even got the RIP track crew to jack her up and grease the springs until the crummy rode like a Pullman.  The trainmaster heard about the accomodations and regularly rode with the crew  when his schedule required his movement along the division. 
    But it wasn't to last.  One of the boomers did a job of short flagging and an extra piled into the caboose, which went up in smoke from the fire in the stove.  The flagman was fired and his partner quit.  They ended up in North Carolina working a shay on a logging pike. 
    The caboose is gone from the rails nowadays, but old-timers remember the red car at the end of the train fondly.   
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: PRR Modeler on August 08, 2020, 06:10:31 PM
Another great story Bill.
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: GPdemayo on August 09, 2020, 09:20:12 AM
Good one Bill..... ;)
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: ReadingBob on August 10, 2020, 06:51:12 AM
Good one Bill.  I sure miss seeing a caboose at the end of a train.  A flashing rear end device doesn't hold any appeal at all.    :'(
Title: Re: The Atlantic & Southern Saturday Report
Post by: Jim Donovan on August 10, 2020, 11:22:30 AM
Loved the story, like going back in time.

Jim D